Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Legal Transactions--Retail Sector

    LAWS 91592 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar addresses the principal legal issues and commercial challenges facing the retail sector. Particular attention will be paid to luxury retailer relations with vendors and other third-party business associates, customers, and investors, the effect of a troubled economy on these relations, and the challenges and opportunities brought about by technology, social media, and e-commerce. Students will develop an understanding of key licensing, IP (including counterfeit goods), antitrust, corporate governance, and professional responsibility legal issues and practice pitfalls. The instructors will emphasize the practical interplay and tension between commercial realities and legal requirements, and strive to demonstrate the increasing professional burdens and responsibilities to which “in-house” counsel are subject. At times, the instructors will use a case-study format to emphasize identification and resolution of contract, IP, antitrust, corporate governance, and other issues and risks experienced by luxury retailers. The instructors also will use actual contracts, retailer policies and practices, litigation and internal-investigation documents. Senior managers from the luxury retailing industry will join several of the class sessions. Tony Bangs, formerly, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of the Neiman Marcus Group, will teach this seminar with Professor Zarfes, whose in-house experience was gained as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Cap Gemini Ernst & Young, and Nate Lutz, Assistant General Counsel at Meijer, a major food retailer. Grades will be based upon quality of class participation, including participation in negotiation exercises (50 percent), and performance of a group project to be undertaken outside of class and presented in class during weeks seven and eight (50 percent). The instructors will emphasize quality of oral and written expression and legal analysis.
    Spring 2016
    Tony Bangs, David Zarfes, Nate Lutz
  • Litigating Financial Disputes

    LAWS 52523 - 01 (3) m, r, s, w, x
    This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar's materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles.
    Autumn 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) l, s, u, w, x
    This class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2016
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters. For additional information concerning the Autumn 2015 Combatant Clemency Project, please follow this link: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/mandel/mental.
    Autumn 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2016
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2016
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Moot Court Boot Camp

    LAWS 99912 - 01 (1) s, u, x
    Moot Court Boot Camp has two components: oral advocacy and writing. The oral argument component will cover the basics of appellate oral argument. Students will receive two different cases and prepare and submit argument outlines in advance. During the workshop, students will gain hands-on experience by conducting multiple oral arguments before a variety of alumni and other practicing attorneys, judges, and faculty. The writing component will cover the basics of appellate brief writing. Students will use tight, persuasive writing to bolster arguments. We will focus on strong issue statements, effective headings, and powerful conclusions. We'll also explore sentence structure and word choice. Students will learn to define themes in their writing and carry them into the oral argument. Focused writing, we will learn, promotes successful oral advocacy. This class, which will meet for the weekend of October 17-18, is an optional supplement to the Hinton Moot Court Competition. The Saturday oral advocacy portion will be held at the offices of Jenner & Block (353 N. Clark Street, Chicago) and the Sunday portion on written advocacy will be held at the Law School. Credit will be granted upon completion of two judged arguments as part of the Hinton Moot Court Competition. Students who register for this class and fail to participate in the Hinton Moot Court Competition will be withdrawn from this class with a grade of W. Students will prepare a short, written assignment that we will discuss and revise during class. There are no prerequisites. Students may only receive credit for this class once during their Law School career. J.D. students only. Does not count towards the yearly seminars/simulation classes limit. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Elizabeth Duquette, Amy M. Gardner
  • National Security Issues and the Development of Legal Practice Skills

    LAWS 70703 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will address current national security issues including presidential power, indefinite incarceration, assassination, electronic surveillance, and cyberwarfare. More than the typical seminar, this class will also focus on helping students develop a range of skills required for successful law practice. Students will form teams of 2-4 persons. Each team will present its analysis of a topic to the class and help facilitate class discussion of the topic. Each team will also submit a short memo on its selected topic. Constitutional Law I or the equivalent is recommended but not required (and can be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2016
    Robert A. Helman
  • Partnership Taxation

    LAWS 44301 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    A review of the principals of partnership taxation, with an emphasis on the tax consequences of the formation, operation and dissolution of partnerships. Matters discussed include the treatment of leverage, capital accounts, disguised sales, mixing bowls, anti-abuse rules and other aspects of partnership taxation. Introductory Income Tax is a prerequisite. Meetings will be held at the offices of Baker & McKenzie, 300 E. Randolph, in the Loop. Dinner is provided. The grade is based on a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2016
    Richard Lipton, Todd Golub
  • Patent Litigation

    LAWS 78004 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar is a hands-on introduction to patent litigation. Using a hypothetical case, Students will explore the practical application of key patent law and litigation concepts. Students will follow the litigation over the course of the term as counsel for plaintiff or defendant. Students will be asked to produce written work (e.g., pleadings, motion papers, deposition outlines, etc.) and to orally argue motions. Potential topics include motions to dismiss or transfer, discovery disputes, claim construction, expert discovery, summary judgment, and appeals. In addition to oral argument, class will discuss practical and legal topics pertaining to patent litigation, typically to assist in preparation of the next week's assignment. Prerequisite: Patent Law.
    Spring 2016
    Steven Cherny
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2016
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2016
    Lawrence Wood
  • Power, Status, and Negotiation

    LAWS 46703 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class introduces participants to social exchange theory and its application to negotiations. We first work to understand how structures of networks and resource dependence influence outcomes of negotiated and reciprocal exchange. To do this, we study four components of social exchange theory: resources, power, brokerage, and status. We evaluate questions like, when are actors more likely to resort to coercive power? When are they more likely to resort to reward power? Which is more effective? How does status impact power and exchange outcomes? We then study how negotiation processes may be informed by structure in influencing outcomes of exchange. Here we evaluate when and how actors influence outcomes in their negotiations using information about network structures and resource dependence models. We spend some time understanding process based research from negotiation theory, psychology, and social psychology, and work towards integrating our understanding of structure, process, and outcomes of exchange. Students participate in five negotiation exercises in and out of class, and complete written assignments based on these exercises and the reading materials.
    Winter 2016
    Zev Eigen
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, l, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Complex Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2016
    Erin Kelly
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Course work will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Corporations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2016
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The course will familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case as well as ethical and other social justice issues encountered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice, and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic will be responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened externship program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the winter and spring quarters. Examples include the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois or the Public Defender’s office in any northern Illinois county. Students will comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, and may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. Other components of each student’s grade are: seminar classroom participation; trial practice exercises; journal entries; and, a 10-page practice paper or research paper. There is no final exam (in either quarter) and students will earn up to seven credits for the course, depending on the placement. Because of the practical component, the class size will be limited to twelve 2L or 3L students, and requires at least ten students to proceed.
    Winter 2016
    Lisa Noller
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The course will familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case as well as ethical and other social justice issues encountered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice, and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic will be responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened externship program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the winter and spring quarters. Examples include the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois or the Public Defender’s office in any northern Illinois county. Students will comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, and may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. Other components of each student’s grade are: seminar classroom participation; trial practice exercises; journal entries; and, a 10-page practice paper or research paper. There is no final exam (in either quarter) and students will earn up to seven credits for the course, depending on the placement. Because of the practical component, the class size will be limited to twelve 2L or 3L students, and requires at least ten students to proceed.
    Spring 2016
    Lisa Noller
  • Strategies and Processes of Negotiation

    LAWS 46702 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    Increasingly negotiation is part of the day-to-day life of managers. The aim of this class is to make students more effective negotiators. Students should leave the class with (1) a structured approach for preparing for and thinking about negotiations; and (2) a refined set of skills for carrying out negotiations. A central part of the class is an extensive set of negotiation simulations. These simulations take students through a variety of negotiations: single and multiple issue; two-negotiator and multiple-negotiator (coalitional); and internal (within organization) and external. In addition, the class includes a number of cases. Lectures, readings, and structured analytical exercises supplement the simulations and cases.
    Winter 2016
    George Wu
  • Structuring Financial Instruments

    LAWS 71400 - 01 (2 to 3) +, l, m, s, w, x
    This seminar introduces tax, legal, accounting and economic principles relevant to the structuring of complex financial instruments—from forwards, swaps and options to convertible bonds and other securities with embedded derivatives. Throughout the seminar, different products designed to achieve similar economic goals will be examined to highlight the significance of structuring choices and the range of techniques available. For example, there are various products that can be used to approximate the economics of buying an asset, without an actual purchase of that asset. The seminar will examine how these products are treated differently for tax, securities law, commodities law, bankruptcy, accounting and other purposes, notwithstanding their economic similarity. Students will develop the ability to optimize transactions by selecting among existing financial instruments or inventing new ones. The seminar will also include discussion of policy issues. No specific prerequisites, but introductory income tax recommended, and knowledge of securities law and bankruptcy law helpful. The seminar will be assessed via a) a series of reaction papers (2 credits) or b) via a full-length research paper (3 credits). Class participation and attendance will be considered.
    Spring 2016
    Jason Sussman
  • Structuring Venture Capital, Private Equity, and Entrepreneurial Transactions

    LAWS 71401 - 01 (3) +, s
    This course covers tax, legal, and economic principles applicable to a series of interesting, complex, current entrepreneurial transactions, utilizing venture capital or private equity financing, including (1) new business start-up, (2) growth-equity investment in existing business enterprise, (3) leveraged buyout of private or public company (including going-private transaction), (4) use of flow-through tax entity such as S corporation, partnership, or LLC for variety of venture capital or private equity financed transactions, (5) devising equity-based executive compensation program, (6) private equity financed restructuring or workout (in or out of bankruptcy) for troubled over-leveraged enterprise and utilizing troubled company’s NOL after restructuring, (7) devising exit scenario for successful venture capital or private equity financed enterprise (such as IPO, SEC rule 144 sale, sale of company, or merger of company into larger enterprise), and (8) forming new venture capital, LBO, or private equity fund. Substantive subjects include federal income tax, securities regulation, corporate law, partnership law, LLC law, bankruptcy law, fraudulent conveyance law, and other legal doctrines, as well as accounting rules and practical structuring issues (including use of common and preferred stock, subordinated debt, convertible debt, convertible preferred stock, warrants, and options), all reviewed in a transactional context, and with discussion of their policy underpinnings and likely future evolution. No specific prerequisites, but introductory income tax strongly recommended, entity taxation desirable, and knowledge of corporate law, securities regulation, bankruptcy, and accounting helpful. However, the course book and the course book appendix contain adequate discussion and supplemental precedents for an understanding of the material covered by the course. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2016
    Jack S. Levin, Donald Rocap