Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Legal Elements of Accounting

    LAWS 79102 - 01 (1) s, x
    This mini-course introduces accounting from a mixed law and business perspective. It covers basic concepts and vocabulary of accounting, not so much to instill proficiency with the mechanics of debits and credits as to serve as a foundation from which to understand financial statements. The course then examines accounting from a legal perspective, including consideration of common accounting decisions with potential legal ramifications. It also analyzes throughout the reasons for and roles of financial accounting and auditing, as well as the incentives of various persons involved in producing, regulating, and consuming financial accounting information. The course will touch on some limitations of, and divergent results possible under, generally accepted accounting principles. Current cases, proposals, and controversies will be discussed. Attendance and participation will be very important. Grades will be based on a take-home final examination. Students with substantial prior exposure to accounting (such as students with an MBA, joint MBA/JD, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors) may not take the course for credit. Class will meet for nine sessions, five days during week 1 (M-F Jan 6-10, 2014) and four days during week 3 (T-F Jan 21-24, 2014), and completion earns one credit.
    Winter 2014
    John Sylla
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) s, u, w, x
    This simulation class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2014
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. Students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. The clinic also provides students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the clinic aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. Students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. The clinic also provides students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Partnership Taxation

    LAWS 44301 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    This course examines income tax aspects of partnerships. Partnerships have become a widely used business structure, particularly since the invention of limited liability companies (which are treated as partnerships for tax purposes) and the increase in the number of start-up ventures and sophisticated financial ventures such as hedge funds and private equity funds that rely upon partnership tax principles to maximize after-tax returns of investors and management. The course uses problem sets to illustrate the application of basic principles to formations, income and loss allocations, borrowings, and distributions of partnerships, with a special focus on applying the tax rules in a transactional setting. Introductory Income Tax is a prerequisite. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation. Note: The class will be taught downtown in the Blue Cross/Blue Shield building at 300 E. Randolph St. Students are to arrive a few minutes early each week to get through security.
    Spring 2014
    Richard Lipton, Todd Golub
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Spring 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Autumn 2013
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Winter 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (20%), one paper-10 pages minimum (10%), and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2014
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (20%), one paper-10 pages minimum (10%), and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2014
    Lawrence Wood
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Complex Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Employment Law Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2014
    Erin Kelly
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Coursework will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Corporations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2014
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) +, a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The goal of the clinic is to enable students to gain hands-on criminal clinical experience, as well as to familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case, including ethical and social justice issues (such as race and poverty) routinely considered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice (through participation in courtroom exercises built around actual criminal cases), and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic is responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened placement program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the Winter and Spring quarters (January through May). Field placements will be formally supervised by coordinators within each program’s office, and the faculty instructors will monitor the student’s substantive work and performance in conjunction with the field placements. Students must comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, which will be considered part of the course grade. In the clinical placements, students may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. For additional information concerning placements, please see http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/prosecutiondefense.
    Winter 2014
    Lisa Noller, Gabriel Plotkin
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) +, a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic provides students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The goal of the clinic is to enable students to gain hands-on criminal clinical experience, as well as to familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case, including ethical and social justice issues (such as race and poverty) routinely considered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic provides students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice (through participation in courtroom exercises built around actual criminal cases), and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic is responsible for securing a field placement and participating in a pre-screened placement program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office for the Winter and Spring quarters (January through May). Field placements will be formally supervised by coordinators within each program’s office, and the faculty instructors will monitor the student’s substantive work and performance in conjunction with the field placements. Students must comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, which will be considered part of the course grade. In the clinical placements, students may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. For additional information concerning placements, please see http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clinics/prosecutiondefense.
    Spring 2014
    Lisa Noller, Gabriel Plotkin
  • Secured Lender Remedies and Workout Transactions

    LAWS 71404 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    Starting first by discussing the parameters under which a borrower company must typically operate under its secured loan facility, this seminar will focus on the remedies available to secured lenders when that borrower defaults and the various workout transactions that may ensue, either before bankruptcy or as a bankruptcy alternative. Remedies will be viewed from the perspective of the secured lender's counsel, including negotiation and documentation of forbearance agreements, consensual turnovers and UCC sales of assets and equity, as well as exercise of pledged equity voting rights.
    Spring 2014
    Erin Casey
  • Strategies and Processes of Negotiations

    LAWS 46702 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This simulation class aims to make you a better negotiator by giving you the analytical frameworks as well as the hands-on experience of negotiating in various roles. In addition to discussing the theoretical “science” of negotiations, you will participate in a series of increasingly complex (and fun!) exercises where you will fine tune the “art” of negotiations. You will work your way from participating in simple two-party, single issues negotiations to multi-party, multi-issue negotiations with internal (within the organization) and external (outside the organization) parties. You will learn how to categorize the problem and prepare for the negotiation; how to create value in an ethical manner; how to ensure that you capture a fair share of the value created; how to form effective coalitions; and how to apply specific tactics to overcome common biases and mistakes made by negotiators. The class will enable you to hone your personal negotiating strengths and work on your personal weaknesses by giving constant feedback showing you how your strategies and tactics worked relative to those used by your classmates. Attendance in every class is compulsory. Grades are based on preparation, participation, reflection reports and a final project. This simulation course will meet 10/2-11/20.
    Autumn 2013
    Radhika Puri
  • Structuring Venture Capital, Private Equity, and Entrepreneurial Transactions

    LAWS 71401 - 01 (3) +, s
    This course covers tax, legal, and economic principles applicable to a series of interesting, complex, current entrepreneurial transactions, utilizing venture capital or private equity financing, including (1) new business start up, (2) growth equity investment in existing business enterprise, (3) leveraged buyout of private or public company (including going-private transaction), (4) use of flow-through tax entity such as S corporation, partnership, or LLC for variety of venture capital or private equity financed transactions, (5) devising equity-based executive compensation program, (6) private equity financed restructuring or workout (in or out of bankruptcy) for troubled over-leveraged enterprise and utilizing troubled company’s NOL after restructuring, (7) devising exit scenario for successful venture capital or private equity financed enterprise (such as IPO, SEC rule 144 sale, sale of company, or merger of company into larger enterprise), and (8) forming new venture capital, LBO, or private equity fund. Substantive subjects include federal income tax, securities regulation, corporate law, partnership law, LLC law, bankruptcy law, fraudulent conveyance law, and other legal doctrines, as well as accounting rules and practical structuring issues (including use of common and preferred stock, subordinated debt, convertible debt, convertible preferred stock, warrants, and options), all reviewed in a transactional context, and with discussion of their policy underpinnings and likely future evolution. No specific prerequisites, but introductory income tax strongly recommended, entity taxation desirable, and knowledge of corporate law, securities regulation, bankruptcy, and accounting helpful. However, the course book and the course book appendix contain adequate discussion and supplemental precedents for an understanding of the material covered by the course. The first meeting of this class will be 12:25-1:40 p.m. on Friday, April 4 in room III. All other meetings will be on Tuesdays, 2:45-6:00 p.m. The class will not meet Tuesday, April 1.
    Spring 2014
    Jack S. Levin, Donald Rocap
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) +, s, u, x
    This class will explore the trial lawyer's craft, with a focus on both the written submissions important in litigation and the courtroom skills required at various stages in the life of a case. The instruction will be by lectures, demonstrations, and participation in learning-by-doing exercises (including a mini-trial). Students will learn how to use motions, depositions, written discovery, expert witnesses, exhibits, and technology as effective litigation tools. Students who have taken LAWS 67503 Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or LAWS 91702 Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy may not take LAWS 67603 Trial Advocacy. While the instructors strongly recommend that students have a good understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence before taking the seminar, this is not an absolute prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, a fifteen-page trial brief, brief in support of a motion, or post-trial brief, and two shorter written pieces. Performance in the mock trial will count for 60% of the students' grade. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.
    Winter 2014
    Tom Dutton, Kevin Van Wart
  • Young Center Immigrant Child Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 65013 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights Clinic combines international human rights, immigration law and children's rights law. Students in the Young Center clinic serve as Child Advocate (similar to a guardian ad litem) for unaccompanied immigrant children detained in Chicago detention facilities. Unaccompanied immigrant children come to the U.S. from all corners of the world, on their own. They are apprehended—typically at the U.S./Mexico border, or through internal enforcement—then detained and placed in deportation proceedings. Direct Client Service: Pursuant to federal law, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the Young Center is appointed as Child Advocate for the most vulnerable of these children (tender age children, children with mental or physical disabilities, children who have experienced extensive trauma, etc.). Law students in the Young Center Clinic are appointed by the federal government to serve as Child Advocate for individual children, and are responsible for advocating for the best interests of the assigned child on issues relating to care, custody, release, legal relief and safe repatriation. Each student meets weekly with the child at the detention facility, and advocates on behalf of the child with federal officials, including immigration judges and asylum officers, under the supervision of Young Center attorneys. Since there currently is no substantive best interests of the child standard under the Immigration and Nationality Act, students look to state child welfare law, international human rights law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and UNHCR Guidelines, and the child protection laws of the child’s home country. Policy Advocacy: In addition to serving as Child Advocate, clinic students have the opportunity to engage in legislative and policy advocacy aimed at improving the immigration system for immigrant children in removal proceedings. This is an especially exciting time because Congress is debating Comprehensive Immigration Reform. The Young Center will travel with students to Washington D.C. to meet with legislative officials in the Senate and the House to educate them about immigrant children and advance specific policies, including the appointment of counsel for immigrant children and incorporation of a substantive best interests of the child standard in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Young Center Clinic admits both second-year and third-year law students. Language skills are not required, but students who speak Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi or Urdu are strongly encouraged to apply. Students who enroll in the clinic must: 1. Participate in a 2-day orientation during the first week of Autumn Quarter (Saturday & Sunday); 2. Participate in a 2-hour weekly seminar during the Autumn Quarter; 3. Participate in bi-weekly brown bag lunch meetings during the Winter and Spring Quarters. For more information about the Young Center, visit: www.TheYoungCenter.org or contact Maria Woltjen at mwoltjen@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0349 or Elizabeth Frankel at efrankel@law.uchicago.edu or 773-702-9587.
    Autumn 2013
    Elizabeth Frankel, Maria Woltjen, Jajah Wu