Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Higher Education and the Law

    LAWS 52102 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This class will look at the law and its relationships to higher education. What does society expect from higher education and how does the law reflect those expectations? Further what does higher education expect form the law? What is academic freedom and how is it viewed by the courts. To examine these questions the class will focus on a number of current issues that are central to higher education including sexual assault, hate speech, affirmative action and faculty selection and retention.
    Autumn 2015
    Arthur Sussman
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judge the semi-final arguments and select the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Autumn 2015
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Winter 2016
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Spring 2016
  • Innovative Solutions for Business, Law, and Society

    LAWS 91304 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Many business, legal, and social problems cry out for the kind of imagination typically found in the fields of art, design, and invention, yet very few of us take time to cultivate the analytic and creative skills that give rise to truly innovative solutions. In this seminar, we will apply “design thinking,” originally developed by the founders of IDEO (the design firm behind Steve Jobs and Apple), and a variety of related techniques, to important business, legal, and social problems. In business, we will look at how successful innovators obtain breakthroughs and then practice the techniques on simple challenges such as inventing a new product. We will then progress to larger, more complex challenges like designing an organization that invents streams of new products. In law, we will first examine why corporate clients hold creative lawyers in the highest regard. We will then take up a challenge faced today by many corporate legal departments – how to develop a system that ensures compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) while still permitting fast growth in the world’s riskiest emerging markets. To further explore design in the area of law, we will look at legal education and determine how design thinking could lead to more imaginative and meaningful reform. In the area of social impact, we will look at how society can enable universal access to potable water and consider new approaches to building sustainable, green cities amidst the new surge in urbanization taking place in India, China, and the developing world. Grading will be determined by class participation and by performance across three papers. The first paper will examine best practices in innovation. The second paper will focus on a specific case in business or the legal profession. The third paper will address a large-scale problem such as climate change, political polarization, North Korea, or the rejuvenation of Chicago’s South Side – and will require students to work in teams and present their work to the class at the conclusion of the seminar.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Manning
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class. The grade is based on a final written paper and will be adjusted to reflect class participation.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Friedman
  • International Business Transactions

    LAWS 44401 - 01 (3) l, m, s, w, x
    This seminar provides a detailed review and analysis of a number of business transactions in a complex international setting. The documents underlying these transactions include: (i) an acquisition agreement, (ii) a joint venture agreement, (iii) an outsourcing agreement and (iv) a license agreement. These documents will be reviewed in the context of these transactions, which involve business entities in several countries. Students will be asked to identify and address key legal issues. They will be asked to analyze, draft and revise key provisions of these agreements and determine whether the drafted provisions achieve the objectives sought. Students will be graded based upon the quality of their preparation for and participation in the seminar and their work product in connection with several drafting assignments.
    Spring 2016
    Alan D'Ambrosio
  • International Environmental Law

    LAWS 92702 - 01 (3) c/l, l, m, w, x
    This seminar examines how global resources can be protected within an international legal framework where state actors reign supreme. Sources of international environmental law and associated enforcement mechanisms will be discussed with reference to various environmental problems such as loss of biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, trans-boundary air pollution, and oil spills. The relationship between trade, development, and environmental protection will receive particular attention throughout the seminar, as will issues arising from the evolving role of non-state actors. The student's grade will be based on class participation and a major paper. Writing for this seminar may be used as partial fulfillment of the J.D. writing requirement.
    Spring 2016
    Georgie Boge Geraghty
  • International Investment Law

    LAWS 96405 - 01 (2 to 3) r, w
    Foreign investment is a central feature of the world economy, and plays an essential role in economic development. It involves a transaction in which an investor in one country (“home state”) sends capital to another (“host state”). But in many cases the transaction is subject to what is called in economics a “dynamic inconsistency problem”, in which the host state’s incentives change once the investment is sunk, and it may want to renege on its promises to the investor. Furthermore, neither side is likely to want any disputes adjudicated in the courts of the other’s country. The global investment regime has arisen to help resolve these problems. The regime includes bilateral investment treaties (known as BITs) as well as multilateral agreements that are embedded in broader treaty structures, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or the Energy Charter Treaty. This course will introduce students to the operation of the investment law regime, with an emphasis on the tensions between home and host states, the impact of the regime on development outcomes, and the relationship between law and arbitration. There are no prerequisites.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • International Tax Policy

    LAWS 44601 - 01 (3) c/l, r, w
    This class provides an introduction to the policy issues raised by the taxation of cross-border flows of investment and income. In recent years, growing international economic integration has been associated with an increased extent and scope of multinational firms’ operations, and with rapidly expanding cross-border investment flows. This class analyzes the tax policy issues raised by these and other related developments. This is not a class on international tax law. While many international tax rules will be introduced and discussed, the focus is on analyzing policy issues using economic and financial perspectives. The class does not require any background in international taxation. It should appeal not only to those with a general interest in taxation and tax policy, but also to those with a background in business law and an interest in the application of economic and financial concepts to the law.
    Winter 2016
    Dhammika Dharmapala
  • Judicial Federalism

    LAWS 59903 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    In this seminar, we will explore the various doctrines that police the line between the role of the federal court system and the often-parallel role of the state courts (or occasionally tribal courts). Those doctrines include, for example, the limits on the subject-matter jurisdiction of the federal courts found in Article III; the Rooker-Feldman doctrine; common-law limitations on federal authority such as those for domestic relations and probate cases; the various abstention doctrines (Pullman, Burford, Younger, Colorado River); the Anti-Injunction Acts; notions of lis pendens that apply in both federal and state courts; and "complete" versus defense preemption. Each meeting will involve a discussion of one or more of these doctrines. Students will write a paper (which can qualify for the substantial writing requirement) for credit in the seminar.
    Winter 2016
    Diane P. Wood
  • Judicial Opinions and Judicial Opinion Writing

    LAWS 52003 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    For many graduates of this law school, their first job is as a judicial law clerk, usually in a federal court of appeals. A few graduates will eventually become judges. More important, many, many graduates will have a litigation practice. As law clerks or judges, they must learn to write judicial opinions. As practicing lawyers, they must learn to think like judges so that they will know how to communicate with them effectively, in briefs and at oral argument: something few lawyers know how to do. The seminar aims to teach law students how to think and write like judges, and so to equip them for a future as law clerks, judges, practicing lawyers--or all three.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Robert Hochman
  • Labor History and the Law

    LAWS 92103 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the historical relationship between American workers and the law. It focuses on legal contests over workers’ rights in the courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies during the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings explore the ways in which law has shaped labor solidarity, class formation, and strategies for organization and resistance. They also consider the influence of organized labor and of labor law on mobilization for social change, including the movements for civil liberties and civil rights. The seminar concludes by exploring current trends in American labor relations, including recent efforts to curtail the collective bargaining rights of public employees.
    Spring 2016
    Laura Weinrib
  • Law and Advances in Medicine

    LAWS 93302 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will address the intersection of medicine, science, and law, focusing on issues related to human research, informed consent, genetic technologies, and other advances in biotechnology. Enrollment is limited to 10 students. Students will write a significant research paper, submitted in three stages, which can be used to satisfy the Writing Project requirement and which will count for 50 percent of the grade. A Writing Project paper can be submitted on the first day of the following quarter. The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Julie Gage Palmer
  • Law and Language

    LAWS 95905 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the ways in which contemporary research in linguistics and philosophy of language might inform debates about interpretation within legal theory. Grades will be based on a series of short reaction papers and class participation (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a 15-page research paper.
    Spring 2016
    Ryan Doerfler
  • Law and Politics: U.S. Courts as Political Institutions

    LAWS 51302 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w
    The purpose of this seminar is two-fold. First, the seminar aims to introduce students to the political science literature on courts understood as political institutions. In examining foundational parts of this literature, the seminar will focus on the relationship between the courts and other political institutions. The sorts of questions to be asked include: Are there interests that courts are particularly prone to support? What factors influence judicial decision-making? What effect does congressional or executive action have on court decisions? What impact do court decisions have? While the answers will not always be clear, students should complete the seminar with an awareness of and sensitivity to the political nature of the American legal system. Second, by critically assessing approaches to the study of the courts, the seminar seeks to highlight intelligent and sound approaches to the study of political institutions. Particular concern will focus on what assumptions students of courts have made, how evidence has been integrated into their studies, and what a good research design looks like.
    Winter 2016
    Gerald Rosenberg
  • Law and Practice of Zoning, Land Use, and Eminent Domain

    LAWS 90602 - 01 (3) +, l, m, w, x
    This seminar is a multi-disciplinary, multi-partisan discussion of the balance between private property rights and governmental regulation in land development. We primarily address (i) constitutional bases of private rights and public land use planning; (ii) eminent domain, takings and exactions (including impact fees and delays); (iii) current manifestations of local and regional planning and zoning, including City of Chicago Zoning Reform; and (iv) legal procedures and practical strategies for obtaining public financial incentives, land use approvals, and "relief" for real estate development projects, large and small. Prior course work in real property and constitutional law are encouraged. Course materials include cases, academic and trade-group commentaries, press coverage, and narrative and graphic exhibits for specific development projects. The student's grade is based on attendance, spirited class participation, and a paper.
    Autumn 2015
    Thomas Geselbracht, Theodore Novak, Paul Shadle