Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Autumn 2013
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Entrepreneurship and the Law

    LAWS 61902 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar examines how the law and legal counsel influence innovation and entrepreneurship in the US, particularly by micro-enterprises. The seminar explores the position of the entrepreneur in society, in the economy, and in our constitutional framework, in order to analyze the entrepreneur's fundamental legal needs. We then survey legal questions particular to start-ups, including strategies for structuring a business organization, financing, and protecting intellectual property. Assignments require students to research issues that apply to hypothetical start-ups and practice lawyerly skills like strategic planning, negotiation, drafting, and counseling. This seminar is required for participation in the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, unless students make other arrangements with the Clinic instructors. Students' grades will be based on active participation and several research and writing assignments.
    Autumn 2013
    Elizabeth Kregor, Erika Harford
  • EU Competition Law: With Special Emphasis on the Application of Advanced Topics in Antitrust

    LAWS 75402 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    The seminar provides an introduction to interesting and cutting edge topics in antitrust economics using European competition law as the backdrop for applying and discussing this. European competition law and its application by the European Commission have evolved rapidly since around 2000. The course focuses on this modern period and the evolving use of economics in the Commission decisions and court judgments. It does not provide an introduction to black-letter EU competition law or a discussion of pre-2000 cases. Topics covered in recent years include the design of antitrust regimes, ordo-liberalism, two-sided markets, screening methods for cartels, dynamic competition, and behavioral economics. Cases covered in recent years have included the Commission’s decisions against MasterCard under Article 101 and Microsoft under Article 102. Grade will be based on a final in-class examination and an optional paper (to receive 3 credits).
    Spring 2014
    David Evans
  • Evolution of Legal Doctrines

    LAWS 65302 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Legal doctrines have life cycles. They are born and mature. Many doctrines fade and die. There is a form of natural selection among doctrines, with several candidates offering to serve the same function in different ways. This seminar looks at the maturation and replacement of doctrines, posing the question why some die and others survive. Scope is eclectic: the doctrines range from "separate but equal" under the equal protection clause to the "original package doctrine" under the commerce clause, from the appointment of counsel under the Sixth Amendment to the understanding of the Rules of Decision Act (that is, why Swift gave way to Erie). The premise of the seminar is that those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Winter 2014
    Frank H. Easterbrook
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two 2013 Supreme Court cases: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year.
    Spring 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal district court and the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and to write briefs to the United States Supreme Court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of the arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two Supreme Court cases last year: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet regularly with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year; students are limited to 3 credits during 2L year to preserve credits for 3L year.
    Autumn 2013
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two 2013 Supreme Court cases: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year.
    Winter 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Federal Sentencing: Balancing Judicial and Prosecutorial Discretion

    LAWS 47602 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The Supreme Court has dramatically changed the federal sentencing landscape in recent years, making federal sentencing the least settled and most dynamic area of federal criminal jurisprudence. This seminar examines the recent federal sentencing revolution in the context of the history of federal sentencing. We study the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and recent Supreme Court cases that try to define the Guidelines’ proper role in sentencing. A central focus of the seminar is the ongoing struggle to balance judicial discretion and prosecutorial discretion, and the fundamental tension this creates between the executive branch and the judiciary. The seminar also focuses on the debate over sentencing disparities. Reading materials are varied and include Supreme Court and lower court cases, the United States Sentencing Guidelines, law review articles, Sentencing Commission studies and reports, and Department of Justice internal directives. Various guest speakers will visit class, including a federal district court judge and an Assistant United States Attorney. Each student is expected to research and write a 20-25 page paper in response to a specific assignment. Students will be graded based on their written submissions and class participation. Second-year students interested in participating in the Federal Criminal Justice Clinic during their 3L year are encouraged to enroll in this seminar, although it is not a prerequisite or corequisite for the clinic.
    Spring 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Food and Drug Law

    LAWS 94501 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course explores legal and policy issues in the federal regulation of foods, drugs, medical devices, and other products coming within the jurisdiction of the FDA. It will examine substantive standards applicable to these products and procedural issues in the enforcement of these standards. It will also address the tension between state and federal regulation in this area, constitutional constraints on such regulation, and a variety of other issues relating to the development and marketing of regulated products. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or major paper.
    Spring 2014
    Jack Bierig
  • Health Law and Policy

    LAWS 78801 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course will explore various policies that underlie regulation of the provision of health care in the United States. We will begin with an examination of the principal government programs for financing the delivery of health care in America, Medicare and Medicaid. This first third of the course will focus on how these programs seek to resolve the tension between controlling costs, promoting quality, and assuring access. We will next address other federal legislation affecting the delivery of health care, including the Affordable Care Act. We will then move to a consideration of policy issues relating to managed care organizations, including the functioning of these organizations and the impact of ERISA on their actions. Next, we will explore issues relating to the behavior of physicians, hospitals, and nursing homes. This exploration will focus on the impact of the antitrust, labor, and tax laws on these entities. The goal of the course is to expose the student to the conflicting law and policy issues that impact on the delivery of health care in this country.
    Winter 2014
    Jack Bierig
  • Higher Education And The Law

    LAWS 52102 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The university has long maintained that its history and role as a creator of knowledge and refuge for society's critics require that the government and the courts extend a special respect to the academy's need to govern itself. This seminar discusses how the courts have dealt with this argument in areas such as academic freedom; student admissions and discipline; faculty tenure, dismissal, and unionization; and teaching and research restrictions. Discussions focus on the competing interests of society and the university and the role of the courts in balancing these interests. The student's grade is based on class participation and a major or substantial paper. This seminar may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Writing Requirement.
    Winter 2014
    Arthur Sussman
  • Historical Semantics and Legal Interpretation: Questions and Methods

    LAWS 51601 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w
    This seminar aims to combine methodologies in research on historical jurisprudence and in theoretical and computational linguistics, with a view to understanding the meanings of words and phrases in context. We will examine theories of textual meaning from legal studies and linguistics, including originalism, textualism, common law constitutionalism, and other methods that require the interpreter to have a theory of which written sources, and which words, count for purposes of determining constitutional meaning. The seminar will also introduce distinctions from formal semantics and pragmatics concerning the construction of meaning, and corpus-based modeling of lexical meaning. The seminar thus aims to acquaint students with these techniques, to apply them to several interpretive questions (e.g., those surrounding the Second Amendment), and to model how such research can be conducted for questions of the students' own interest. Third hour of course optional for Law students. 16 seats will be initially allocated to Law School students and 10 to Linguistics students. Law students wishing to enroll in the seminar should email a short statement of interest to both professors, including their background in relevant areas and the reasons for their interest in the seminar, by August 26. Linguistics students should email no later than December 17. A final paper will be required.
    Winter 2014
    Alison LaCroix
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Spring 2014
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Autumn 2013
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Winter 2014
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class.
    Autumn 2013
    Michael Friedman
  • International Arbitration

    LAWS 94602 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar gives students a practical foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. With the emergence of the global economy and the explosive growth of cross-border transactions and multinational joint ventures, international arbitration has become the leading mechanism for resolution of international commercial disputes. With parties increasingly unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements are now a mainstay of cross-border commercial transactions. Topics include the crafting of effective international arbitration agreements, the relative advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc UNCITRAL-style arbitration and institutional arbitration (ICC, AAA, etc.), the rules of procedure that govern international arbitration, the difficult procedural issues that commonly arise in international arbitration (such as the availability and extent of discovery, the consolidation of parties and claims, etc.), procedural and substantive issues applicable to investor-state arbitration, the effective presentation of evidence, and the enforcement of international arbitral awards. The student's grade is based upon the quality of preparation for and oral participation in the seminar, as well as the quality of a required research paper.
    Spring 2014
    Alan D'Ambrosio
  • International Finance

    LAWS 48901 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    Today the volume of international financial flows far exceeds the volume of international trade. This seminar addresses the international regulatory aspects of U. S. domestic banking and security markets and contrasts them with foreign markets. The focus is on U.S., European, and other regulatory systems and the role of international financial institutions. In addition to introductory material on U.S. banking and securities regulation, foreign exchange markets, and the growth of Eurocurrency markets, two particularly current topics will be addressed: (1) international regulatory aspects of the recent international financial crisis and (2) changes in U.S. law made or under consideration to respond to that crisis. Special attention will be paid to the "Euro problem" and to Chinese financial markets.
    Winter 2014
    Kenneth W. Dam
  • International Human Rights Law

    LAWS 96101 - 01 (3) c/l, r, w
    This course is an introduction to international human rights law, covering the major instruments and institutions that operate on the international plane. It includes discussion of the conceptual underpinnings of human rights, the structure of the United Nations System, the major international treaties, regional human rights machinery, and the interplay of national and international systems in enforcing human rights. It will also provide an introduction to international relations theories: When and why do states commit to international human rights standards? And when does international human rights law actually make a difference on the ground? To illustrate these themes, the course will draw when possible on current international events covered in the media.
    Autumn 2013
    Mila Versteeg
  • Islamic Law and Finance

    LAWS 80222 - 01 (3) c/l, m, w, x
    This seminar will provide students with an overview of the modern Islamic finance industry. We will review the basic sources of Islamic law and jurisprudence and consider the prohibitions on unjustified increase (riba) and excessive risk (gharar). We will explore the classical rules of Islamic contract and commercial law and their application in the modern context. The growth of the modern Islamic finance industry from the 1970’s to the present will be examined. The main Islamic financial products will be reviewed. We will consider legal questions in structuring transaction documentation. We will explore the ethical underpinnings of Islamic finance and the social justice questions highlighted by the intersection of religion and finance. Regulatory issues will be discussed. We will also consider the political environment in which Islamic finance currently operates. The seminar is intended to familiarize students with the essential legal framework of the rapidly emerging market for highly technical and sophisticated Islamic financial products.
    Autumn 2013
    Cynthia Shawamreh