Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys

    LAWS 79112 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will teach the basic fundamentals of accounting to better prepare you to recognize and understand financial business issues related to the practice of law. Topics include key accounting concepts, reading financial statements and financial statement analysis. The class sessions will include guest speakers presenting on current accounting topics such as Sarbanes Oxley, working with the SEC and forensic accounting (investigating accounting frauds). The class is designed for those who have never taken an accounting class and/or have little financial background. There are no prerequisites but you should not take this class if you have taken an accounting class before or if you have experience in finance or accounting. Students may not receive credit for both LAWS 79102 (Legal Elements of Accounting) and LAWS 79112 (Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys). Grades will be based on papers and a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Philip Bach, Sean Young
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection papers. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Winter 2015
    Neha Lall
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection papers. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Spring 2015
    Neha Lall
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Autumn 2014
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • How to Avoid a Regulatory Nightmare: Compliance and Regulatory Strategies for the Post Crisis World

    LAWS 94814 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    Since the financial crisis of 2008, regulators and prosecutors around the world increasingly expect companies to have state of the art governance, risk and compliance programs as a condition for remaining in business and for avoiding liabilities for regulatory missteps. Increasingly, regulatory rules are becoming more complex and authorities are becoming more unforgiving, with stepped up efforts to secure criminal and civil penalties against companies, their executives, lawyers and auditors. For companies, such liability can at best result in plummeting share prices, and at worst the shutting down of an enterprise. For individuals, they can result in incarceration, fines, penalties and removal from the business. While many of the principles apply to all industries, the seminar will explore the regulatory and legal foundations for these programs primarily through the lens of the financial services sector, which includes banks, brokerage firms, investment companies and investment advisers. We will also explore how the design and execution of these programs can avoid or limit potential liabilities from regulatory and criminal authorities. From the perspective of a corporate executive or counsel, students will develop the ability to understand the fundamentals of regulatory regimes overseeing these businesses, as well as strategies for successfully engaging the regulators. Students will consider the steps a firm should take to mitigate regulatory and reputation risk, including the importance of an effective corporate ethics program, as well as how, in the process, a firm can enhance its brand, meet the expectations of its board of directors and create value for its shareholders. The grade is based on a final take-home exam, a short research paper and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Charles Senatore
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Autumn 2014
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Winter 2015
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Spring 2015
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Intensive Trial Practice Workshop

    LAWS 67503 - 01 (3) +, s, u
    This practicum teaches trial preparation, trial advocacy, and strategy through a variety of teaching techniques, including lectures and demonstrations, but primarily through simulated trial exercises. Topics include opening statements, witness preparation, direct and cross examination, expert witnesses, objections at trial, and closing argument. Practicing lawyers and judges are enlisted to provide students with lectures and critiques from varied perspectives. The practicum concludes with a simulated jury trial presided over by sitting state and federal court judges. Open to J.D. students only. Completion of this workshop partially satisfies one of the requirements for admission to the trial bar of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. This practicum is open only to students entering their 3L year and limited to 48 with preference given to students who have been accepted into a Litigation Clinic course. Students who have taken Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603), Poverty and Housing Law Clinic (LAWS 90512), or Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy (LAWS 91702) may not take this class. This practicum is offered for approximately six hours/day during the two weeks prior to the beginning of the Autumn quarter. The 2014 Workshop is scheduled from 9/15 through 9/26, and the final trial is scheduled for Saturday, September 27. The student's grade is based on a compilation of daily performance evaluations.
    Autumn 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Craig B. Futterman, Mark J. Heyrman, Randall D. Schmidt, Randolph N. Stone
  • International Arbitration

    LAWS 94602 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar gives students a practical foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. With the emergence of the global economy and the explosive growth of cross-border transactions and multinational joint ventures, international arbitration has become the leading mechanism for resolution of international commercial disputes. With parties increasingly unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements are now a mainstay of cross-border commercial transactions. Topics include the crafting of effective international arbitration agreements, the relative advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc UNCITRAL-style arbitration and institutional arbitration (ICC, AAA, etc.), the rules of procedure that govern international arbitration, the difficult procedural issues that commonly arise in international arbitration (such as the availability and extent of discovery, the consolidation of parties and claims, etc.), procedural and substantive issues applicable to investor-state arbitration, the effective presentation of evidence, and the enforcement of international arbitral awards. The student's grade is based upon the quality of preparation for and oral participation in the seminar, as well as the quality of a required research paper.
    Spring 2015
    Alan D'Ambrosio
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (2 to 3) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-2 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
    Autumn 2014
    Brian Citro, Caroline Bettinger-López
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-2 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
    Winter 2015
    Brian Citro, Caroline Bettinger-López
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the U.S. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Working in teams on active human rights cases and projects, students will develop and hone their international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to also enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Students are also encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break periods. Students in their first quarter of IHRC must enroll for 2-3 credits; students can enroll in the IHRC for 1-2 credits in subsequent quarters, in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses.
    Spring 2015
    Brian Citro
  • International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy

    LAWS 96205 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar considers major issues in contemporary international human rights from the perspective of the advocate. It is designed to introduce students to the range of human rights advocacy, grounded in the history of human rights movements, the development of international human rights norms, and contemporary case studies. The initial class sessions will familiarize participants with key human rights standards and their implementation and enforcement through international, regional and national institutions and by non-governmental organizations. The remainder of the seminar will evaluate human rights advocacy tools and strategies applied in current political and social contexts. Through case studies and simulated human rights research and advocacy projects, students will develop the skills to conduct international human rights work, including international field-work and fact-gathering, interviewing witnesses and victims of abuses, assessing various litigation and non-litigation strategies, conducting legal research using diverse sources, evaluating successes and challenges, and developing cross-cultural competency skills. Class discussions and readings will expose students to cutting-edge research methodologies and technologies used to monitor and promote human rights. Additionally, students will learn how to grapple with and navigate the ethical challenges of international human rights work. The grade for the class will be based on class participation, in-class simulation exercises, and short assignments that will require students to conduct research, develop strategic advocacy plans, and draft documents aimed at advancing particular human rights issues.
    Autumn 2014
    Caroline Bettinger-López
  • Judicial Opinions and Judicial Opinion Writing

    LAWS 52003 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    For many graduates of this law school, their first job is as a judicial law clerk, usually in a federal court of appeals. A few graduates will eventually become judges. More important, many, many graduates will have a litigation practice. As law clerks or judges, they must learn to write judicial opinions. As practicing lawyers, they must learn to think like judges so that they will know how to communicate with them effectively, in briefs and at oral argument: something few lawyers know how to do. The seminar aims to teach law students how to think and write like judges, and so to equip them for a future as law clerks, judges, practicing lawyers--or all three. The grade will be based on a series of short research papers.
    Winter 2015
    Richard A. Posner
  • Leadership

    LAWS 75102 - 01 (2 to 3) m, r, s, w, x
    The divide between law and business is becoming increasingly blurred as clients look to their lawyers not merely for legal advice but also for leadership and results-focused solutions to complex business problems. Increasing competition, early specialization, and client cost constraints provide junior attorneys with few opportunities to develop the skills necessary to meet these increasing expectations. Through this highly intensive seminar, students will develop the judgment and practical skills necessary to become effective leaders and problem solvers, as well as an understanding of the theoretical foundations of effective leadership. Topics will include project management, strategic vision, forms of influence, and business leadership. Materials will include cutting-edge research, case histories, videos, and literature. Class sessions occasionally will include speakers who have played important leadership roles. The student's grade will be based on active and insightful class participation, reflection papers on assigned readings, and a final paper on an instructor-approved topic of the student's choosing (examples of potential topics include leadership in alliance formation, variations in governing board structures, performance consequences of executive succession, and leadership in outsourcing relationships). The seminar will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be developing leadership presentations and completing major projects outside of class. If there is sufficient student interest, there may be a follow-on leadership seminar offered in the Spring. A 2-CREDIT OPTION IS AVAILABLE WITH PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.
    Winter 2015
    David Zarfes
  • Legal Elements of Accounting

    LAWS 79102 - 01 (1) +, s, x
    This mini-course introduces accounting from a mixed law and business perspective. It covers basic concepts and vocabulary of accounting, not so much to instill proficiency with the mechanics of debits and credits as to serve as a foundation from which to understand financial statements. The course then examines accounting from a legal perspective, including consideration of common accounting decisions with potential legal ramifications. It also analyzes throughout the reasons for and roles of financial accounting and auditing, as well as the incentives of various persons involved in producing, regulating, and consuming financial accounting information. The course will touch on some limitations of, and divergent results possible under, generally accepted accounting principles. Current cases, proposals, and controversies will be discussed. Attendance and participation will be very important. Grades will be based on a take-home final examination. Students with substantial prior exposure to accounting (such as students with an MBA, joint MBA/JD students, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors) may not take the course for credit. Students may not receive credit for both LAWS 79102 (Legal Elements of Accounting) and LAWS 79112 (Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys). Class will meet for nine sessions over the first three weeks of the quarter, as follows: Mon Jan 5 Tue Jan 6 Wed Jan 7 Mon Jan 12 Tue Jan 13 Wed Jan 14 Tue Jan 20 Wed Jan 21 Thu Jan 22
    Winter 2015
    John Sylla
  • Litigating Financial Disputes

    LAWS 52523 - 01 (3) m, r, s, w, x
    This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles. The grade is based on a series of short research papers or a final written paper.
    Spring 2015
    Anthony Casey