Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Autumn 2013
    Martha Nussbaum, Sarah Conly
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Winter 2014
    Martha Nussbaum, Sarah Conly
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year on only in the fall quarter. It is open to all students, JSDs and LLMs are welcome. Both versions count as 1 seminar. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The fall quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The FALL ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP. May be taken concurrently with any other class or workshop. During Winter, the workshop is expected to meet the first four Weeks of the quarter; during Spring, the last four weeks of the quarter. The fall only version has short reaction papers that are not for the writing credit. The full year version is writing or revising a work to publishable form and if successfully completed fulfills the requirement. Grading is 60% written work, 40% participation.
    Winter 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (2) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year on only in the fall quarter. It is open to all students, JSDs and LLMs are welcome. Both versions count as 1 seminar. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The fall quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The FALL ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP. May be taken concurrently with any other class or workshop. During Winter, the workshop is expected to meet the first four Weeks of the quarter; during Spring, the last four weeks of the quarter. The fall only version has short reaction papers that are not for the writing credit. The full year version is writing or revising a work to publishable form and if successfully completed fulfills the requirement. Grading is 60% written work, 40% participation.
    Spring 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex, and Gender

    LAWS 63312 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w, x
    This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions, to be held irregularly throughout the Winter and Spring quarters, are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse. The grade is based on a substantial paper or series of short reaction papers, with class participation taken into account. Substantial paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of the instructor.
    Winter 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex, and Gender

    LAWS 63312 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions, to be held irregularly throughout the Winter and Spring quarters, are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse. The grade is based on a substantial paper or series of short papers, with class participation taken into account. Substantial paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of the instructor.
    Spring 2014
    Mary Anne Case