Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding credits and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2015
    Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Law and Race

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop; many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. The theme for 2015-16 is  Race and Law. Speakers will include: Derrick Darby (Michigan), Elizabeth Anderson (Michigan), Justin Driver (Chicago), Sally Haslanger (MIT), Charles Mills (Northwestern), Michele Moody-Adams (Columbia), Tommie Shelby (Harvard). Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Please see http://www.law.uchicago.edu/workshops/lawandphilosophy for additional information concerning each session. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The paper may satisfy the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. Students must enroll for all three quarters to receive credit. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail by September 20. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Autumn 2015
    Martha Nussbaum, Derrick Darby, Alexander Prescott-Couch
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Law and Race

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop; many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. The theme for 2015-16 is  Race and Law. Speakers will include: Derrick Darby (Michigan), Elizabeth Anderson (Michigan), Justin Driver (Chicago), Sally Haslanger (MIT), Charles Mills (Northwestern), Michele Moody-Adams (Columbia), Tommie Shelby (Harvard). Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Please see http://www.law.uchicago.edu/workshops/lawandphilosophy for additional information concerning each session. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The paper may satisfy the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. Students must enroll for all three quarters to receive credit. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail by September 20. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Winter 2016
    Martha Nussbaum, Derrick Darby, Alexander Prescott-Couch
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Law and Race

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop; many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. The theme for 2015-16 is  Race and Law. Speakers will include: Derrick Darby (Michigan), Elizabeth Anderson (Michigan), Justin Driver (Chicago), Sally Haslanger (MIT), Charles Mills (Northwestern), Michele Moody-Adams (Columbia), Tommie Shelby (Harvard). Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Please see http://www.law.uchicago.edu/workshops/lawandphilosophy for additional information concerning each session. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The paper may satisfy the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. Students must enroll for all three quarters to receive credit. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail by September 20. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Spring 2016
    Martha Nussbaum, Alexander Prescott-Couch
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year (every other week in Winter and Spring quarters) or only in the Autumn quarter. It is open to all students, including JSDs and LLMs. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The Autumn quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The AUTUMN ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full-year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP.
    Winter 2016
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (2) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year (every other week in Winter and Spring quarters) or only in the Autumn quarter. It is open to all students, including JSDs and LLMs. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The Autumn quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The AUTUMN ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full-year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP.
    Spring 2016
    Lisa Bernstein