Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Contracts and Commercial Transactions

    LAWS 91553 - 01 (2 to 3) s, x
    The objective of this course is to familiarize the student with contracts as used by sophisticated parties. Accordingly, this course will explore "real-world" contracts actually entered into by "real-world" companies—the Coca-Cola's, Microsoft's, and HP's of the world. Through this course, the student will attain a certain facility with agreements, their organization and structure, their language, and their provisions (and the interaction of these provisions). In addition to looking at contracts through the eyes of parties and practitioners, the course will pay considerable attention to how courts have treated various contractual provisions, exploring areas of substantive law—including, and in addition to, contract law—to the extent relevant. Readings will include comments from leading practicing attorneys (from law firms such as Sidley, Kirkland, and Cravath, and from legal departments at companies such as Microsoft, Accenture, and JPMorgan). The student's grade will be based on in-class participation as well as a mid-term exercise and a take-home final exam. The mid-term exercise will involve substantial time spent outside of class negotiating and drafting an agreement and writing a memorandum analyzing this agreement. The take-home final exam will require the student to apply the tools and concepts developed by reviewing and working with contracts throughout this course to an agreement not presented in class or the materials. The course will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be negotiating and drafting contracts outside of class. This course is highly recommended for those students interested in taking other transactional offerings at the Law School, including (but, of course, not limited to) the Corporate Lab: Transactional Clinic. A 2-credit option is available with permission from the instructor.
    Autumn 2013
    David Zarfes
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class).Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the course for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, the Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Microsoft, Nike, and Verizon Communications. 2L students only.
    Spring 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class).Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the course for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, the Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Microsoft, Nike, and Verizon Communications.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class).Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the course for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, the Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Microsoft, Nike, and Verizon Communications.
    Autumn 2013
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Accenture, Allstate, General Mills, Honeywell, IBM, Innova, and Northern Trust. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the ABA Corporate Social Responsibility Committee in the publishing of a quarterly newsletter.
    Autumn 2013
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Accenture, Allstate, General Mills, Honeywell, IBM, Innova, and Northern Trust. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the ABA Corporate Social Responsibility Committee in the publishing of a quarterly newsletter. 2L students only.
    Spring 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: Accenture, Allstate, General Mills, Honeywell, IBM, Innova, and Northern Trust. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the ABA Corporate Social Responsibility Committee in the publishing of a quarterly newsletter.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 03 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: CDW, Integrys Energy, Italian Trade Commission, JPMorgan Chase, Lincoln Center, McDonald's, Schreiber Foods, Schneider National and Sony Electronics.
    Autumn 2013
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 03 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: CDW, Integrys Energy, Italian Trade Commission, JPMorgan Chase, Lincoln Center, McDonald's, Schreiber Foods, Schneider National and Sony Electronics. 2L students only.
    Spring 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 03 (3) +, a, s, x
    This transactional clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at multinational participant companies. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both (a) substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and (b) professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors a real world work experience: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience, and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. This offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Please note that (i) students who register are expected to remain in the clinic for three consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, and (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only. Students will also be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating companies. While certainly not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking this class. Clients in this section are expected to include some or all of the following: CDW, Integrys Energy, Italian Trade Commission, JPMorgan Chase, Lincoln Center, McDonald's, Schreiber Foods, Schneider National and Sony Electronics.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Naveen Thomas, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Autumn 2013
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The Juvenile and Criminal Justice Clinic provides legal representation to poor children and young adults accused of delinquency and crime. The Clinic is a national leader in expanding the concept of legal representation to include the social, psychological and educational needs of clients. Students will examine the juvenile and criminal justice systems’ relationships to the poor and marginalized through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public education, including the development of policies for crime and violence prevention and system reform. Student work includes legal research and drafting motions, briefs, memoranda, and pleadings in state, appellate and federal courts as required. Students will interview clients and witnesses; conduct fact investigations; and develop effective pre- and post-trial strategies, including alternatives to incarceration. Trial work may include licensed students appearing in court to argue contested motions, negotiate with opposing counsel, and generally second-chair trials. In misdemeanor cases, students may first-chair trials. Licensed students may also present oral argument before appellate and federal courts. All students will participate in community, professional and bar association activities. Students work in teams to foster collaboration and ensure continuity in representation. The Clinic social worker and social work students are involved in many of the cases and activities. All students are encouraged to work creatively, and across disciplines. Participation includes weekly case meetings and obviously court appearances. Students wishing to enroll are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Other recommended courses: Criminal Procedure, Juvenile Justice, and Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or Trial Advocacy. Students may continue in the clinic throughout their 2 and 3L years: academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Divorce Practice and Procedure

    LAWS 93202 - 01 (3) +, s, u, w, x
    This class provides an exposure to the dynamic process of representing clients in a dissolution of marriage case. The class will familiarize you with the complexities that arise when a family is divided and the parties are dissolving their marriage. Topics are covered in the sequence of an evolving case from the perspective of a practicing lawyer and include determination of jurisdiction, interstate and international parental kidnapping, domestic violence and property injunctions, temporary and permanent child custody and visitation, temporary and permanent maintenance for spouse and support for children, awards of attorneys’ fees and costs, exploration of property rights and factors for determining division of assets and liabilities, the valuation issues when dividing certain types of property, premarital agreements, common ethical issues, federal tax aspects of marital dissolution, effects of bankruptcy and civil unions/same-sex marriage. Significant reading, writing and preparation for in-class discussions is required. Forty percent of the student’s grade is based on class participation, and sixty percent on the drafting of legal memoranda. Writing for this class may be used as partial fulfillment of the JD writing requirement (WP). Completion of a basic Family Law class is recommended but not required.
    Autumn 2013
    Erika N. Chen-Walsh
  • Drafting Contracts: The Problem of Ambiguity

    LAWS 79910 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar is unique. It is a very interesting, very intellectual, and very practical learning experience. The main features are: 1. Students will learn some extremely useful tools for analyzing and drafting contracts. They will acquire them by an inductive process of reviewing many examples of ambiguity from case law, eminent legal scholars, and the lecturer’s practice. They will learn to identify and eliminate ambiguity in drafting contracts. These tools are the creation of the lecturer and will give students unique practical skills that no other American law students (except the lecturer’s prior students) have. 2. The course materials come from the in-house seminars for the firm’s China Practice lawyers that the lecturer conducted for many years as a partner at Baker & McKenzie and that established the profession’s best practices for China-related contracts. 3. The historical examples of ambiguity in the seminar are of human, as well as intellectual, interest. They show that ambiguity can lead to the hanging of an individual for piracy or treason, a damages award of more than U.S. $10 billion, and even a change in the course of World War II. 4. The seminar facilitates student learning. At the beginning of each class, an audience response system (called “clickers”) provides students immediate, comparative, and anonymous feedback on their understanding of the reading assignment. The seminar also allows each student to see what he or she has learned in the seminar by comparing his or her analysis of a specific contract for the first class and for the last class. This contract analysis, like the final exam, gives each student the experience of a practicing lawyer reviewing a contract. Grades will be based on a proctored final exam.
    Winter 2014
    Preston Torbert
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Spring 2014
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Winter 2014
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Autumn 2013
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Entrepreneurship and the Law

    LAWS 61902 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar examines how the law and legal counsel influence innovation and entrepreneurship in the US, particularly by micro-enterprises. The seminar explores the position of the entrepreneur in society, in the economy, and in our constitutional framework, in order to analyze the entrepreneur's fundamental legal needs. We then survey legal questions particular to start-ups, including strategies for structuring a business organization, financing, and protecting intellectual property. Assignments require students to research issues that apply to hypothetical start-ups and practice lawyerly skills like strategic planning, negotiation, drafting, and counseling. This seminar is required for participation in the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, unless students make other arrangements with the Clinic instructors. Students' grades will be based on active participation and several research and writing assignments.
    Autumn 2013
    Elizabeth Kregor, Erika Harford
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Autumn 2013
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens