Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s, x
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Autumn 2014
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Winter 2015
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein
  • Corporate Lab Transactional Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s
    The Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients will include some or all of the following: Amazon, Baxter Healthcare, Blue Haven Initiative (a Pritzker family NGO), Booth School of Business New Venture Challenge (Spring Quarter), GE Capital, Honeywell, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Microsoft, Motorola, Nike, Northern Trust, Schreiber Foods, and Verizon Communications. Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students entering in or after Autumn Quarter 2014 are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) LL.M. students may register by instructor permission only, and (iv) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. While not a prerequisite, “Contracts and Commercial Transactions” (offered Autumn Quarter) is strongly recommended to all students prior to, or concurrent with, taking the Corporate Lab. Student grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. For additional information, see the Corporate Lab website at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/corporatelab.
    Spring 2015
    David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Ellis A. Regenbogen, David Finkelstein
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Autumn 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Winter 2015
    Herschella G. Conyers, Laura Ferry, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Spring 2015
    Herschella G. Conyers, Laura Ferry, Randolph N. Stone
  • Cross-Border Transactions: Lending

    LAWS 71406 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    The worlds of corporate finance and secured transactions law reform interact to make cross-border lending a dynamic, cutting-edge field of law. Due to the rapid globalization of U.S. business, U.S. banks and other lenders are increasingly being asked to finance the international business activities of U.S. middle-market companies, often in countries that have laws incompatible with U.S. secured transactions law. At the same time, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), the World Bank and other international organizations are actively encouraging developing countries, where access to capital is scarce, to modernize their secured transactions laws to promote the availability of low-cost secured credit for small and medium-sized enterprises as a way of creating jobs, raising standards of living and contributing to a country's overall economic growth and political stability. This seminar explores both worlds. Students will examine the broad array of legal and practical issues encountered by U.S. lenders as they make loans to foreign companies, obtain security interests in foreign collateral and finance foreign corporate acquisitions. They will also study recent initiatives in secured transactions law reform, and consider how they are exerting a profound influence on cross-border corporate finance in developed as well as developing countries. Richard Kohn, a founder of the Chicago law firm Goldberg Kohn Ltd., specializes in representing banks in cross-border lending transactions and has been active for over a decade as a member of the Expert Group in the development of various secured transactions law reform texts, including the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Secured Transactions. Because cross-border lending touches upon many areas of law, the seminar provides a useful introduction to international commercial transactions in general. There are no prerequisites. Grades will be based on a team project involving interaction with lawyers in other countries, a number of short papers, class participation and a take-home exam.
    Winter 2015
    Richard Kohn
  • Cross-Border Transactions: Securities, M&A, and Joint Ventures

    LAWS 71408 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    In this seminar we will examine M&A, securities and financing transactions from a comparative perspective looking at how cross-border transactions vary from purely domestic transactions with a focus on negotiations. We will also look at joint ventures and related concerns for bribery and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The class will focus on recent transactions such as Instagram/Facebook (domestic); Skype/Microsoft (US/Luxembourg), the Mail.ru IPO (Russia/UK), and various other multijurisdictional transactions. The class will feature accomplished guest speakers from legal and business backgrounds. The class will also develop cultural negotiation skills through mock negotiations as well as discussing cultural faux pas and peculiarities across borders. Substantial out of classroom work, group projects, etc. Each week the students will meet in teams to markup contracts and spend a portion of the subsequent class negotiating the contracts.
    Autumn 2014
    Tarek Sultani
  • Drafting Contacts: The Problem of Ambiguity

    LAWS 79910 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar is unique. It is a very interesting, very intellectual, and very practical learning experience. The main features are: 1. Students will learn some extremely useful tools for analyzing and drafting contracts. They will acquire them by an inductive process of reviewing many examples of ambiguity from case law, eminent legal scholars, and the lecturer’s practice. They will learn to identify and eliminate ambiguity in drafting contracts. These tools are the creation of the lecturer and will give students unique practical skills that no other American law students (except the lecturer’s prior students) have. 2. The course materials come from the in-house seminars for the firm’s China Practice lawyers that the lecturer conducted for many years as a partner at Baker & McKenzie and that established the profession’s best practices for China-related contracts. 3. The historical examples of ambiguity in the seminar are of human, as well as intellectual, interest. They show that ambiguity can lead to the hanging of an individual for piracy or treason, a damages award of more than U.S. $10 billion, and even a change in the course of World War II. 4. The seminar facilitates student learning. At the beginning of each class, an audience response system (called “clickers”) provides students immediate, comparative, and anonymous feedback on their understanding of the reading assignment. The seminar also allows each student to see what he or she has learned in the class by comparing his or her analysis of a specific contract for the first class and for the last class. This contract analysis, like the final exam, gives each student the experience of a practicing lawyer reviewing a contract. Grades will be based on a proctored final exam.
    Winter 2015
    Preston Torbert
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Autumn 2014
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Winter 2015
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Spring 2015
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Entrepreneurship and the Law

    LAWS 61902 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar examines how the law and legal counsel influence innovation and entrepreneurship in the US, particularly by micro-enterprises. The seminar explores the position of the entrepreneur in society, in the economy, and in our constitutional framework, in order to analyze the entrepreneur's fundamental legal needs. We then survey legal questions particular to start-ups, including strategies for structuring a business organization, financing, and protecting intellectual property. Assignments require students to research issues that apply to hypothetical and real start-ups and practice lawyerly skills like strategic planning, negotiation, drafting, and counseling. This seminar is required for participation in the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, unless students make other arrangements with the Clinic instructors. Students' grades will be based on active participation and several research and writing assignments.
    Autumn 2014
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Autumn 2014
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Winter 2015
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Spring 2015
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Autumn 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls, who must put a minimum of 7 credits towards clinic work. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls, who will receive a total of 3 credits in 2L year and must put 6 credits towards clinic work during 3L year.
    Winter 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take the Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls, who must put a minimum of 7 credits towards clinic work. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls, who will receive a total of 3 credits in 2L year and must put 6 credits towards clinic work during 3L year.
    Spring 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Fourteenth Amendment Seminar

    LAWS 68304 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    The only reading for this seminar is some introductory material about the legislative history of the fourteenth amendment. At the beginning of the quarter, students will be assigned to "courts" and will receive three cases every two weeks to discuss and vote on. They will then produce as many majority, dissenting, and concurring opinions as appropriate. These opinions should rely solely on the fourteenth amendment, its legislative history, and the prior precedent of each "court." Thus, during the course of the semester, each "court" will develop its own, hypothetical jurisprudence. Once during the quarter, each court will be excused from writing opinions and will, instead, divide into two law firms that will brief and argue a case before another of the courts. Regular "events from the real world" will occur based on the opinions each court files. Students enrolling in this seminar should be aware of the following: 1. Part of the seminar grade will be based upon the opinions students sign whether or not they write them; 2. No feedback will be provided on the opinions during the quarter, but at the end of the seminar, students may select one or two opinions on which they will receive detailed feedback; 3. Many students find that the seminar is an intense experience, often involving many hours of intra-court discussion and negotiation over outcomes and opinions. The grade is based on a series of reactions paper and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Louis Michael Seidman