Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Law and the Mental Health System

    LAWS 47001 - 01 (3) r, w
    The course examines the interrelationship between legal doctrine; procedural rules; medical, cultural, and social scientific understandings of mental disability; and institutional arrangements affecting the provision of services to the mentally disabled. Consideration is given to admission to and discharge from mental health facilities, to competency to consent to or to refuse treatment, to surrogate decision-making for those found incompetent, to the rights of those confined in mental health facilities; to discrimination against the mentally disabled, and to the rights of the mentally disabled in the criminal justice system. Grades are based on a final paper or a final take-home exam, and class participation.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Leadership

    LAWS 75102 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, r, s, w
    The divide between law and business is becoming increasingly blurred as clients look to their lawyers not merely for legal advice but also for leadership and results-focused solutions to complex business problems. Increasing competition, early specialization, and client cost constraints provide junior attorneys with few opportunities to develop the skills necessary to meet these increasing expectations. Through this highly intensive seminar, students will develop the judgment and practical skills necessary to become effective leaders and problem solvers, as well as an understanding of the theoretical foundations of effective leadership. Topics will include project management, strategic vision, forms of influence, and business leadership. Materials will include cutting-edge research, case histories, videos, and literature. Class sessions occasionally will include speakers who have played important leadership roles. The student's grade will be based on active and insightful class participation, reflection papers on assigned readings, and a final paper on an instructor-approved topic of the student's choosing (examples of potential topics include leadership in alliance formation, variations in governing board structures, performance consequences of executive succession, and leadership in outsourcing relationships). The seminar will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be developing leadership presentations and completing major projects outside of class. Enrollment is very limited given the unique nature of this seminar, and instructor approval is required. If there is sufficient student interest, there may be a follow-on leadership seminar offered in the Spring. A 2-credit option is available with permission of instructor.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes
  • Marriage

    LAWS 68001 - 01 (3) +, c/l, r, w, x
    With the aim of making predictions and recommendations for the future, this course examines marriage as a state-sponsored institution, considering its history, its variants (e.g., common law marriage) and close substitutes (e.g., domestic partnership), conceptual frameworks for analyzing it (e.g., analogies between marriage and the business corporation or partnership or relational contract), past and future variants on the joining of one man and one woman (e.g., polygamy and same-sex marriage), and the use of marriage as an ordering principle in various areas of law. Constitutional Law III is a recommended prerequisite. The grade is based on a substantial paper, series of short reaction papers, or final examination, with class participation taken into account. Paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates require permission of the instructor.
    Spring 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Originalism and its Critics

    LAWS 76803 - 01 (3) +, m, r, x
    This seminar covers a prominent and controversial method of constitutional interpretation -- originalism. Students will read judicial opinions and academic scholarship on different aspects of the original meaning of the Constitution, as well as theoretical scholarship for and against originalism, and scholarship confronting challenges such as precedent and changing circumstances. A prior constitutional law course is highly recommended. Grading will be based on class participation and a research paper.
    Winter 2014
    Eric Posner, William Baude
  • Private Regulation

    LAWS 95103 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the role of private non-governmental entities in regulating standard of behavior in society. It explores prominent cases in which private entities set standards, regulate entry, monitor compliance, and impose sanctions in activities related to risk, health, safety, finances, living standards, and privacy. Private regulators can act as complements—but also as substitutes—to government regulation. For example, retailers regulate safety, environmental, and labor practices of their suppliers; hospitals regulate professional practices of physicians; insurers regulate the safety practices of their policyholders; universities regulate innovation and the development of knowledge; trade associations regulate conduct in their industries; and Google regulates a host of issues, from privacy and decency to branding and even geo-political mapping. Students will be required to write (SRP-level) papers on case studies, examining particular examples of private “outsourced” regulations and evaluating their advantages and shortcomings relative to public regulation.
    Autumn 2013
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Public International Law

    LAWS 72901 - 01 (3) c/l, r, w
    This course is an introduction to public international law, which is the body of law that nation states have jointly created for the purpose of governing their relations. The course focuses on the sources of international law, international institutions such as the United Nations, international adjudication, and various substantive fields of international law, such as the use of force, human rights, the treatment of aliens, and international environmental law. Grades will be based on class participation and an examination. A paper option is allowed for students who wish to write an SRP.
    Winter 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Public Opinion, Public Policy, and the Law

    LAWS 69002 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will explore the intersection of public opinion, public policy, and the law. To date, questions about whether and how public opinion influences public policy have been addressed primarily by political scientists. But these questions are also vital to several legal domains, in particular constitutional law and election law. In the constitutional law context, the mistranslation of public opinion into public policy may be evidence of a political malfunction that requires judicial intervention. In the election law context, one of the most important functions of elections is to align the preferences of the electorate with the policies enacted by their representatives. The seminar will tackle these complex and interesting issues through readings drawn from legal scholarship, political theory, and empirical political science. An effort will also be made to have outside speakers present papers once or twice during the quarter.
    Winter 2014
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Racism, Law, and Social Sciences

    LAWS 54303 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth study of theories and methods for analysis of racialization in past and present societies. Analyses of the social construction of racial and ethnic identities have facilitated studies of the ways in which social differences are created, maintained, and masked. Subjects to be addressed in this seminar include the interrelation of racializing ideologies with other cultural and social dimensions, such as class, ethnicity, gender, political and legal structures, and economic influences. We will also consider the related histories of biological and genetic concepts of different races within the human species as part of the context of our study of racism operating within social processes. The seminar includes a major writing project in the form of a seminar paper.
    Winter 2014
    Christopher Fennell
  • Regulation of Sexuality

    LAWS 72201 - 01 (3) +, c/l, r, w
    This course explores the many ways in which the legal system regulates sexuality, sexual identity, and gender and considers such regulation in a number of substantive areas as well as the limits on placed on such regulation by constitutional guarantees including free speech, equal protection, and due process. Readings include cases and articles from the legal literature together with work by scholars in other fields. The grade is based on a substantial paper, series of short reaction papers, or final examination, with class participation taken into account. Paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates require permission of the instructor. Constitutional Law I, III, and/or IV are recommended but not required prerequisites.
    Spring 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Regulatory Interpretation

    LAWS 51604 - 01 (3) +, m, r, w, x
    This seminar will explore whether regulatory texts warrant interpretive theories distinct from those applicable to statutes, and what those approaches should entail. Relevant topics will include the institutional differences between agencies and Congress; judicial doctrines regarding an agency’s interpretation of its own rules; and the extent to which agencies should interpret regulations differently than courts. Administrative Law or Legislation and Statutory Interpretation are recommended as background; students who have not taken either course will require instructor permission. Grades will be based on class participation, including weekly short questions or comments posted to Chalk, and a research paper.
    Spring 2014
    Jennifer Nou
  • The Federal Budget

    LAWS 52801 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    The budget sets the size and scope of government. It affects everything the federal government does. The United States is currently facing a budgetary crisis that will involve hard choices about government spending and taxation. This seminar will examine the federal budget process. It will start by examining the basic facts about the U.S. fiscal situation and budget, how the budget is calculated, and the process by which it is set. The seminar will then turn to central topics within the budget, such as taxation, health care, social security, and discretionary spending. Finally, it will consider budget reform proposals. Students will be expected to write a paper on a topic related to the federal budget.
    Autumn 2013
    Anup Malani, David A. Weisbach
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (1 to 2) a, m, r, w
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professor William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This seminar that will meet January 10-12, as follows: Friday, January 10, 2014: 9:00 a.m. noon; 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Saturday, January 11, 2014: 9:00 a.m. noon; 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 12, 2014: 9:00 a.m. noon We'll schedule two additional class sessions in the Spring quarter for paper presentations. The first one is scheduled on Friday, April 25th from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in room C. The second session has not been scheduled yet.
    Spring 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (1 to 2) m, r, w, x
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professor William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This seminar that will meet January 10-12, as follows: Friday, January 10, 2014: 9:00 a.m. - noon; 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Saturday, January 11, 2014: 9:00 a.m. - noon; 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 12, 2014: 9:00 a.m. - noon We'll schedule two additional class sessions in the Spring quarter for paper presentations. The first one is scheduled on Friday, April 25th from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in room C. The second session has not been scheduled yet.
    Winter 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2013
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2014
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2014
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2013
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Spring 2014
    Martha Nussbaum, Sarah Conly