Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Anthropology and Law

    LAWS 93812 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar for law students and graduate students in the social sciences will provide an introduction to the field of legal anthropology. We will address anthropological theories of the nature of law and disputes, examine related studies of legal structures in non-Western cultures, and consider the uses of anthropology in studying facets of our own legal system. By examining individual legal institutions in the context of their particular cultural settings, we can begin to make cross-cultural comparisons and contrasts. In so doing, we confront the challenge of interpreting and understanding the legal rules and institutions of other cultures while assessing the impact of our own social norms and biases on the analysis. Thus, our analytic and interpretative approach will require us to examine the cultural assumptions that underpin various aspects of our own belief systems and the American legal system. The grade is based on a final written paper (80%) and class participation (20%).
    Winter 2015
    Christopher Fennell
  • Antitrust Law

    LAWS 42801 - 01 (3) x
    This course provides an introduction to the law of antitrust. The course focuses on the practices by which competing firms eliminate, or are alleged to eliminate, competition among themselves. The practices considered include formal cartels, price-fixing conspiracies, conscious parallelism, trade association activities, resale price maintenance, and mergers to monopoly and other types of horizontal merger. The course also looks at the practices by which firms, either singly or in combination, exclude actual or potential competitors from their markets, by means of practices such as boycotts, predatory pricing, tying arrangements, vertical integration, and price discrimination under the Robinson-Patman Act. Both price and non-price vertical restrictions are considered. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Winter 2015
    Randal C. Picker
  • Banking Law

    LAWS 80201 - 01 (3) x
    This course will consider the regulation of banks and other financial institutions in the United States. The focus will be on the current regulatory scheme, with some attention to the recent financial crisis, the history of banking regulation, and proposals for reform. The student's grade will be based on a proctored final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Eric Posner
  • Bankruptcy and Reorganization: The Federal Bankruptcy Code

    LAWS 73601 - 01 (3) x
    This course studies the Federal Bankruptcy Code and the law of corporate reorganization. Topics include the rights of creditors in bankruptcy, the relationship between bankruptcy law and state law, the treatment of executory contracts, bankruptcy planning, the restructuring of corporations in Chapter 11, and the procedure for confirming plans of reorganization. There are no prerequisites for this course. Booth students do not require instructor consent in order to submit a registration request. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Winter 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Bankruptcy and Reorganization: The Federal Bankruptcy Code

    LAWS 73601 - 01 (3) x
    This course studies the Federal Bankruptcy Code and the law of corporate reorganization. Topics include the rights of creditors in bankruptcy, the relationship between bankruptcy law and state law, the treatment of executory contracts, bankruptcy planning, the restructuring of corporations in Chapter 11, and the procedure for confirming plans of reorganization. There are no prerequisites for this course. Booth students do not require instructor consent in order to submit a registration request. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Douglas G. Baird
  • Brief-writing and Appellate Advocacy Seminar

    LAWS 79905 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar will be devoted to the art of brief-writing and appellate advocacy. Topics will include how to select the best arguments, how to choose a theme and structure the facts and the argument, and how to write the brief in a way that it is clear, concise and persuasive on the first read. Grades will be based on two papers -- an opening brief and a reply.
    Spring 2015
    Michele Odorizzi
  • Business of Law

    LAWS 61602 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will focus our students' critical reasoning skills on their own chosen profession through an in-depth and interdisciplinary examination of the business of law. We will analyze the business, how it is changing, and professional development issues that all new lawyers should expect to arise over their long and varied careers. Classes will include guests with expertise in law firm management, client relationship skills, industry trends, and lawyer career development to prompt a robust and candid dialogue from a variety of perspectives. Reading materials will include selected articles, excerpts, and David H. Maister's influential Managing the Professional Services Firm. Grades will be based on short reaction papers.
    Winter 2015
    Bruce W. Melton
  • Business Organizations

    LAWS 42301 - 01 (4) +, x
    This is an introductory course on the law of business organizations. While we will focus primarily on corporate law, we will also cover agency and partnership law and emerging legal entities such as limited liability partnerships and limited liability companies. The class is not open to students who are taking, or have taken, Business Associations I, Business Associations II, or Corporation Law. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Daniel R. Fischel
  • Business Organizations

    LAWS 42301 - 01 (3) +, x
    This is an introductory course on the law of business organizations. We will focus primarily on the law of corporations and limited liability companies. The course will cover the duties of managers and directors to the business and its stakeholders. Issues of control, litigation procedure, and mergers and acquisitions will also be covered. The class is not open to students who are taking, or have taken, Business Associations I, Business Associations II, or Corporation Law. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    George Geis
  • Business Organizations

    LAWS 42301 - 02 (3) +, x
    This is an introductory course on the law of business organizations. While we will focus primarily on corporate law, we will also cover agency and partnership law and emerging legal entities such as limited liability partnerships and limited liability companies. The class is not open to students who are taking, or have taken, Business Associations I, Business Associations II or Corporation Law. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Kelli Alces
  • Buyouts

    LAWS 42602 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    In this seminar we will examine conflicts of interest in mergers and acquisitions, and especially in going private transactions in which publicly held companies are acquired by affiliates of private equity firms with the participation of the company's management or by controlling shareholders. Both types of transactions raise conflict of interest issues because some of the company's directors or officers, who are charged with protecting the public shareholders, may be accused of having interests adverse to those of the public shareholders. We will examine the methods that Delaware law has provided for dealing with these conflicts of interest and whether those methods are likely to be effective. We will also look at a variety of other issues raised by going private transactions, including why they occur, whether they are likely to be beneficial to shareholders in spite of the existence of conflicts of interest, the consequences to society of these transactions and certain conflict and other issues that can arise in transactions even if they are neither management nor controlling shareholder buyouts. Finally, we will examine the role of the lawyers and financial advisors who are involved in these transactions. Grades will be based on a paper and class participation. Some of the topics in this seminar will also be covered in Mergers and Acquisitions, but that course is not a prerequisite for this seminar and students may take both classes.
    Spring 2015
    Scott Davis
  • Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought

    LAWS 57013 - 01 (3) +, a, m
    This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
    Autumn 2014
    Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
  • Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought

    LAWS 57013 - 01 (2) a, m, r, w
    This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
    Winter 2015
    Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
  • Canonical Ideas in Legal Thought

    LAWS 57013 - 01 (2) a, m, r, w
    This year-long research seminar is the equivalent of a research colloquium in a PhD program. During the Autumn quarter, students will read, discuss, and critique some of the most influential law review articles from the twentieth century, as well as newer papers that extend and apply those canonical ideas to modern legal problems. The readings will consist of a healthy mix of public law and private law, and various scholarly methodologies. During the Autumn quarter, students will write short reaction papers on the readings, and each student will once during the term facilitate the class discussion of an article, drawing on their outside research to do so. Students will also work with faculty to identify a topic for a substantial research paper. During the Winter quarter, the seminar will not meet in formal sessions, but each student will work on his or her research paper and will meet individually with the instructors to assess the paper’s progress. During the Spring quarter, the seminar will reconvene, and students will workshop their drafts (i.e., each student will circulate his or her draft in advance and answer questions from students and faculty). Students are expected to produce papers of publishable quality because the seminar’s ultimate goal is to prepare students for the process of entering the legal academy. Students will receive an Autumn quarter grade based on the reaction papers, discussion facilitation, and class participation. Students will receive a separate grade for the Winter and Spring quarters based on the quality of their research papers and class participation. Every student must enroll for the entire year; students may not drop the class after the Autumn quarter. Students may only enroll with the permission of the instructors. Students interested in enrolling should email Professors Abebe, Malani, and Masur a resume and a one-paragraph statement explaining why they would like to enroll in the seminar no later than August 21, 2014.
    Spring 2015
    Daniel Abebe, Anup Malani, Jonathan Masur
  • Child Exploitation and Human Trafficking

    LAWS 47103 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar provides a comprehensive, practical introduction to the history and present-day reality of child sexual exploitation, as well as to the interconnected web of domestic and transnational federal laws and law enforcement efforts launched in response to this global challenge. The seminar will use a text written by the professor and a colleague who have the distinctive perspective of two individuals who have spent their careers in the trenches investigating, prosecuting, and adjudicating these intricate and commonly emotional cases. The seminar will offer open debate about child sexual abuse by stripping it of its unhelpful, constricted definitions, and by candidly discussing the state of the law, the criminal justice process, and the treatment of offenders and victims. The seminar examines today's system of federal anti-exploitation laws; the connection between modern communications technologies, such as the Internet, and the rise in U.S. and foreign child exploitation; the unique challenges posed by transnational investigations; organized crime's increasing domination over the commercial sexual exploitation of children; the current state of the U.S. government's transnational anti-trafficking efforts; the myriad international legal instruments designed to enhance transnational enforcement efforts; how, during investigations and trials, to avoid re-injuring the child-victims; the hallmarks of an effective trial strategy; the most promising investigative and trial avenues for the defense; and, what contemporary research tells us about charging and sentencing-related issues, including victimization and recidivism rates. Taught by federal district court judge, Hon. Virginia M. Kendall. The grade is based on a final written paper.
    Winter 2015
    Virginia Kendall
  • Chinese for Lawyers

    LAWS 98003 - 01 (1)
    This class offers an introduction to the legal environment of the People’s Republic of China and basic concepts and terminology of Chinese law. Although not designed as a comprehensive survey, the class will cover a list of topics the general knowledge on which may serve as a good basis for the students’ further studies in Chinese law. Students interested in China-related law practice/working opportunities in the Greater China region may also find the class useful as it aims to improve the students’ language and communication skills in legal settings. Classroom instruction and reading material are both expected to be in Chinese. English interpretation will be provided from time to time as the instructors may determine necessary during the course of instruction. Other adjustments to course material are also possible based on the enrolled students’ general proficiency in Chinese. The instructors encourage interested students to discuss expected language proficiency in advance. The class meets once a week and the students will receive pass/fail grades. Three short papers in Chinese on assigned topics (500 characters or more) are required for receiving one credit.
    Autumn 2014
    Zhuang Liu, Xin Dai
  • Cicero on Friendship and Aging

    LAWS 52403 - 01 (3) +, c/l
    Two of Cicero’s most enduring works are De Amicitia (On Friendship) and De Senectute (On Old Age). We will read the entirety of both works in Latin and study their relationship to Cicero’s thought and life. Other readings in translation will include related works of Cicero and quite a few of his letters to Atticus and other friends. The first hour of each course meeting will be devoted to translation, the rest to discussion, in order to give opportunities for auditors who are reading in translation. The requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and a paper. Anyone from anywhere in the university may register if you meet the prerequisite. This is a Latin course that presupposes five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others interested in taking it may register for an Independent Study and have different requirements, more writing and no Latin, but they will take a final exam (different).
    Winter 2015
    Martha Nussbaum
  • Civil Procedure I

    LAWS 30211 - 01 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Autumn 2014
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Civil Procedure I

    LAWS 30211 - 02 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Autumn 2014
    Emily Buss
  • Civil Procedure II

    LAWS 30221 - 01 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter. This class will meet twice weekly during two of the three listed times.
    Spring 2015