Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Computer Crime

    LAWS 68402 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the legal issues involved in the investigation and prosecution of computer crime. We will examine how computers and network technologies are challenging settled legal understandings of the Fourth Amendment, the First Amendment, and the laws of electronic surveillance. The first part of the seminar will address the prosecution of substantive computer crime, which falls into two general categories: computer misuse offenses and traditional crimes facilitated by computers. The second part of the seminar will cover computer crime procedure. We will evaluate the statutory and constitutional regimes that govern the investigation of computer crime, including the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Wiretap Act, and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Our primary source will be a casebook: ORIN KERR, COMPUTER CRIME LAW (3r ed. 2012). In addition to the casebook, I will be providing supplemental materials as listed in the syllabus. Students are required to participate in class sessions, prepare discussion papers, and write a paper on an approved topic. Students may opt to write a major research paper for three credits.
    Winter 2014
    William Ridgway
  • Conflicts of Law

    LAWS 41501 - 01 (3)
    This course will examine the legal framework for the resolution of interstate conflicts of law within the U.S., focusing on the choice of law principles that courts apply to determine the rule of decision in cases where the relevant parties, conduct or transactions have connections to more than one state. The course will consider how conflicts of law rules implicate important separation of powers, federalism and private international law concerns. Topics include the federal constitutional limitations on choice of law, the extent to which courts must give full faith and credit to the judgments of courts in other states, and the role of international conflicts of law rules on the domestic enforcement of foreign judgments.
    Autumn 2013
    Daniel Abebe
  • Constitutional Decisionmaking

    LAWS 50202 - 01 (3) +, m, r, s, w
    Students enrolled in this seminar work as courts consisting of five Justices each. During each of the first eight weeks of the quarter, the courts are assigned several hypothetical cases raising issues under either the Equal Protection Clause or the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of speech and press. Each court must select in advance whether it will focus on equal protection or the First Amendment. All cases must be decided with opinions (concurring and dissenting opinions are, of course, permitted). The decisions may be premised on the legislative history of the amendment (materials on that history will be provided) and on any doctrines or precedents created by the Justices themselves. The Justices may not rely, however, on any actual decisions of the United States Supreme Court. The seminar is designed to give students some insight into the problems a justice confronts in collaborating with colleagues, interpreting an ambiguous constitutional provision, and then living with the doctrines and precedents he or she creates. Constitutional Law is not a prerequisite for participation in this seminar. Enrollment will be limited to three courts. Since the members of each court must work together closely under rigid time constraints, it is preferable for students to form their own complete courts. Students will complete a major research paper. First Meeting is on Thursday, March 27th from 12:30-1:30 in room C. Second Meeting is TBD.
    Spring 2014
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Constitutional Law I: Governmental Structure

    LAWS 40101 - 01 (3) x
    This course provides an introduction to federal constitutional law and constitutional theory. Topics to be covered include the function of judicial review; the role of the states and the federal government in the federal structure; and the allocation of powers among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    Autumn 2013
    Alison LaCroix
  • Constitutional Law I: Governmental Structure

    LAWS 40101 - 01 (3)
    This course analyzes the structure of American government, as defined through the text of the Constitution and its interpretation. The major subjects covered are the allocation of powers among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; the function of judicial review; and the role of the states and the federal government in the federal structure. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Aziz Huq
  • Constitutional Law II: Freedom of Speech

    LAWS 40201 - 01 (3) +, x
    A study of the doctrine and theory of the constitutional law of freedom of speech. The subjects for discussion include advocacy of unlawful conduct, defamation, invasion of privacy, commercial speech, obscenity and pornography, offensive speech, symbolic expression, protest in public places, regulation of campaign finance, and selective government subsidies of speech. Students who have completed Constitutional Law IV are ineligible to enroll in this course. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation.
    Winter 2014
    David A. Strauss
  • Constitutional Law II: Freedom of Speech

    LAWS 40201 - 01 (3) +, x
    A study of the doctrine and theory of the constitutional law of freedom of speech. The subjects for discussion include advocacy of unlawful conduct, defamation, invasion of privacy, commercial speech, obscenity and pornography, offensive speech, symbolic expression, restrictions on the speech of government employees, restrictions on speech in schools and colleges, the relevance of free speech principles to museums and libraries, protest in public places, regulation of campaign expenditures and communications, freedom of the press as a distinct principle, and regulation of the electronic media. Students who have completed Constitutional Law IV are ineligible to enroll in this course. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation.
    Autumn 2013
    Laura Weinrib
  • Constitutional Law III: Equal Protection and Substantive Due Process

    LAWS 40301 - 01 (3) x
    This course considers the history, theory, and contemporary law of the post-Civil War Amendments to the Constitution, particularly the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. The central subjects are the constitutional law governing discrimination on the basis of race, gender, and other characteristics, and the recognition of individual rights not explicitly enumerated in the Constitution. Throughout, students consider certain foundational questions, including the role of courts in a democracy and the question of how the Constitution should be interpreted.
    Autumn 2013
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Constitutional Law III: Equal Protection and Substantive Due Process

    LAWS 40301 - 01 (3)
    This course considers the history, theory, and contemporary law of the post-Civil War Amendments to the Constitution, particularly the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. The central subjects are the constitutional law governing discrimination on the basis of race, gender, and other characteristics, and the recognition of individual rights not explicitly enumerated in the Constitution. Throughout, students consider certain foundational questions, including the role of courts in a democracy and the question of how the Constitution should be interpreted. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Construction Law

    LAWS 44032 - 01 (3) +, w
    Construction contracts are among the more complex types of legal arrangements, involving multiple actors (governments/regulatory agencies, developers/owners, contractors, subcontractors, equipment suppliers, sureties, insurers and financing parties) and multiple areas of the law (contracts; procurement; torts; insurance; environmental concerns; dispute resolution). The course will provide an introduction to the legal aspects of the construction process, including the relationships between and the risk allocations among the members of the construction team, as well as the resolution of disputes which arise out of the design and construction of heavy industrial and commercial projects. The standard US and international forms of contracts (AIA, FIDIC) will be reviewed and discussed.
    Autumn 2013
    Thomas Vega-Byrnes
  • Consumer Law

    LAWS 57502 - 01 (3) +
    This course examines the legal framework for consumer protection law in the United States. It explores the federal and states' consumer protection legislation as well doctrines of common law that limit unfair and deceptive contract practices. The course will pay special attention to consumer financial and mortgage protection and consumer protection on the Internet. Contracts is a pre-requisite. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Autumn 2013
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Contract Drafting and Review

    LAWS 79912 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar will serve as an introduction to contracting drafting and how such drafting differs from other types of legal writing. We will start with the basic "anatomy of a contract," discussing the meaning, use and effect of various provisions. The seminar will address not only legal drafting issues, but also how to understand a client's practical business needs in order to effectively use the contract as a planning and problem solving tool. Students will draft and review specific contract provisions, and will learn how to read, review and analyze contracts with an eye toward both legal and business risk issues. Grades will be based upon class participation, a series of weekly drafting exercises, and a final take-home assignment.
    Autumn 2013
    Joan E. Neal
  • Contract Law for LLM Students

    LAWS 48605 - 01 (3) x
    This course in contracts is designed for LLM students in lieu of attending a regular 1L course. It will cover both common law and statutory law and focus on both case analysis and application to real world problems. In lieu of an exam students will turn in short assignments each class. The class will culminate in the negotiation and drafting of a commercial agreement. The class assumes no knowledge of contract law in the US, but that the student has taken a contracts class in another jurisdiction (a general civil law class meets this requirement). Bring your practice experience with you, we can learn from one another!
    Winter 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Contract Negotiation - Outsourcing

    LAWS 79913 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a simulated contract negotiation for the outsourcing of services. Students will be divided into "buyers" and "sellers" and then paired up to draft, review, revise, negotiate and finalize a contract with their opposing counsel partner(s) by the end of the quarter, with a focus on risk assessment and risk mitigation in the contract. Instructors will act as the clients for the two sides of the transaction, providing necessary business and legal guidance to their students/counsel over the course of the simulation. The simulation will require not only in-class participation, but also negotiation sessions to be scheduled by the teams between class meetings. The simulation may begin with a Request for Proposal ("RFP") and/or term sheet, and continue through the drafting and completion of an agreement. Grades will be based upon class participation (including the ability to work with others in a collaborative and effective manner) and the instructors' review of the final agreement(s) reached by the parties. Negotiation and drafting of final agreement to memorialize negotiations, plus preparation of a signing memorandum. Substantial group work outside of class is required.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes, Joan E. Neal
  • Contracts

    LAWS 30511 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, is an introduction to commercial and consumer law and lays the foundation for advanced study in commercial transactions, corporations, restitution, consumer credit, insurance, labor and employment law, and investment securities. Substantively, the Contracts course deals with how contracts are formed, which contracts are valid, when a contract has been breached and the various remedies for breach, including damages, specific performance, and restitution. The course is also designed to introduce the student to legal methodology and to compare the common law with the techniques of statutory interpretation, particularly in connection with the Uniform Commercial Code. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter.
    Winter 2014
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Contracts

    LAWS 30511 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, is an introduction to commercial and consumer law and lays the foundation for advanced study in commercial transactions, corporations, restitution, consumer credit, insurance, labor and employment law, and investment securities. Substantively, the Contracts course deals with how contracts are formed, which contracts are valid, when a contract has been breached and the various remedies for breach, including damages, specific performance, and restitution. The course is also designed to introduce the student to legal methodology and to compare the common law with the techniques of statutory interpretation, particularly in connection with the Uniform Commercial Code. The student's grade is based on a single final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Eric Posner
  • Contracts

    LAWS 30511 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, is an introduction to commercial and consumer law and lays the foundation for advanced study in commercial transactions, corporations, restitution, consumer credit, insurance, labor and employment law, and investment securities. Substantively, the Contracts course deals with how contracts are formed, which contracts are valid, when a contract has been breached and the various remedies for breach, including damages, specific performance, and restitution. The course is also designed to introduce the student to legal methodology and to compare the common law with the techniques of statutory interpretation, particularly in connection with the Uniform Commercial Code. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter.
    Winter 2014
    Douglas G. Baird
  • Contracts

    LAWS 30511 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, is an introduction to commercial and consumer law and lays the foundation for advanced study in commercial transactions, corporations, bankruptcy law, restitution, consumer credit, insurance, labor and employment law, and investment securities. Substantively, the Contracts course deals with how contracts are formed, which contracts are valid, when a contract has been breached and the various remedies for breach, including damages, specific performance, and restitution. The course is also designed to introduce students to legal methodology, particularly common law reasoning and incrementalism. The student's grade is based on a proctored, four-hour final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Edward Morrison
  • Contracts and Commercial Transactions

    LAWS 91553 - 01 (2 to 3) s, x
    The objective of this course is to familiarize the student with contracts as used by sophisticated parties. Accordingly, this course will explore "real-world" contracts actually entered into by "real-world" companies—the Coca-Cola's, Microsoft's, and HP's of the world. Through this course, the student will attain a certain facility with agreements, their organization and structure, their language, and their provisions (and the interaction of these provisions). In addition to looking at contracts through the eyes of parties and practitioners, the course will pay considerable attention to how courts have treated various contractual provisions, exploring areas of substantive law—including, and in addition to, contract law—to the extent relevant. Readings will include comments from leading practicing attorneys (from law firms such as Sidley, Kirkland, and Cravath, and from legal departments at companies such as Microsoft, Accenture, and JPMorgan). The student's grade will be based on in-class participation as well as a mid-term exercise and a take-home final exam. The mid-term exercise will involve substantial time spent outside of class negotiating and drafting an agreement and writing a memorandum analyzing this agreement. The take-home final exam will require the student to apply the tools and concepts developed by reviewing and working with contracts throughout this course to an agreement not presented in class or the materials. The course will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be negotiating and drafting contracts outside of class. This course is highly recommended for those students interested in taking other transactional offerings at the Law School, including (but, of course, not limited to) the Corporate Lab: Transactional Clinic. A 2-credit option is available with permission from the instructor.
    Autumn 2013