Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • The Life and Times of the Warren Court

    LAWS 50313 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar will explore the historical and constitutional dimensions of the Warren Court. It will examine the Court's decisions in such areas as racial discrimination, voting, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, criminal procedure, and privacy. The focus will be not only on the decisions, but also on the historical, political, legal, and cultural factors that shaped the Warren Court's work. We will also examine several of the Justices as individuals as well as the Warren Court's legacy. Each student will write several short papers during the course of the quarter. Upper-level History undergraduates with consent of instructors.
    Spring 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone, Jane Dailey
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professors Dennis Hutchinson and William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This is a special seminar that will meet on: Friday, April 10, 2015: 9 am-Noon; 2-4 pm Saturday, April 11, 2015: 9 am-Noon; 2-4 pm Sunday, April 12, 2015: 9 am-Noon In April or May, we will hold a session for student paper presentations
    Spring 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding credits and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The US-China Treaty Project

    LAWS 80806 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    The United States and China are engaged in the most important bilateral relationship of our era, yet the relationship remains random, fragile, and mistrustful. China’s rising influence threatens to change the global status quo, and the United States is understandably concerned. If these two giants learn how to collaborate, they could conceivably solve the world’s greatest problems. Alternatively, if they elect to contest each other at every turn, the result will be global instability and crisis. Unfortunately, the Shanghai Communiqué, which helped to open China forty years ago, is no longer sufficient as a guide; a new framework is needed. The world has grown less structured and more volatile, and the two nations are more competitive than ever. The risk of conflict is growing along with the volume of sensitive interactions. It is time for both nations to negotiate a new bargain that will guide and support the steady maturation of their high-potential, high-risk relationship. This seminar will advocate that the two nations develop a new, fifty-year treaty in the form of a strategic cooperation agreement. We will define the rationale and the case for action, draft major components of the proposed treaty, outline the pathway required for adoption, and transmit our end-product to foreign policy authorities in Washington and Beijing. Grading will be determined by class participation and by performance across three short papers. The first paper will examine best practices in bilateral treaty development; the second will focus on critical factors in the future United States – China relationship; and, the third will require drafting of key components for the proposed treaty.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Manning
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is placed on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Autumn 2014
    Saul Levmore
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus. Note: Class will not meet on Friday, January 16, 2015.
    Winter 2015
    Lee Fennell
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Autumn 2014
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Winter 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Trade Secrets

    LAWS 45902 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will examine the law that governs the protection of trade secrets and other confidential proprietary information. This body of law is typically given short shrift in intellectual property courses, notwithstanding the importance of trade secrecy protection in the information-based economy. The goal of this seminar is to provide trade secrecy with more sustained attention. Most of the reading for the seminar will consist of trade secret case law, to be supplemented by some interdisciplinary readings on trade secrecy protection. Students will be graded on the basis of short response papers due every other week (some of which will require outside research) and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 45701 - 01 (3) x
    Course covering federal and state doctrines governing trademarks, domain names, and geographical indications; state law unfair competition doctrines; trademark dilution; publicity rights; and federal registration of trademarks. The student's grade is based on a final proctored examination.
    Autumn 2014
    William M. Landes
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    This class will focus on the trial phases of civil litigation. Simulated trial problems designed to promote knowledge of the litigation process and to afford individual experience in selected phases of trial practice will be employed to familiarize students with pragmatic tactical issues and solutions. Written trial materials will be used and instruction will by lecture, demonstration, and exercise (including a mini-trial). Students who have taken the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (LAWS 67503) may not take Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603). An understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence is preferred but not a prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, and one or more written assignments. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.
    Spring 2015
    Jay Cohen
  • U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 50311 - 01 (2) l, m, s, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth look at the Supreme Court---its current docket and recent trends in its decisions, the modern debate over its proper role, and both written and oral advocacy before the Court. In addition to class participation, students are graded on a legal brief (generally 15-25 pages in length) and on their performance in a moot court.
    Autumn 2014
    Michael Scodro
  • Uncorporations

    LAWS 42305 - 01 (2) m, x
    Businesses today are more likely to be organized as limited partnerships, LLCs, trusts, or other alternatives to the standard corporation. In this seminar, we will examine these "uncorporate" entities in a range of contexts, ranging from law firms to investment funds to plain vanilla businesses. We will consider the theory of uncorporate entities, the major laws governing them, the differences between them and corporate entities, and the bubbling policy questions. Grades will be based on in-class presentations and a paper.
    Winter 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Utilitarian Ethics

    LAWS 51206 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m
    The British Utilitarians were social radicals who questioned conventional morality as a basis for both personal and public choice and proposed an alternative that they believed to be both more scientific and more morally adequate. In part because of the widespread acceptance of pieces of their views in economics and political science, the original subtlety and radical force of the views is often neglected. This seminar, focusing on John Stuart Mill and Henry Sidgwick, aims to examine sympathetically what classical Utilitarianism may still offer to philosophical ethics, and to see how the strongest criticisms of Utilitarianism measure up to the texts of its founders. Although it is hardly possible to study Utilitarianism as an ethical theory without attending to its political role, we shall focus for the most part on ethics, and on two works above all: Mill’s Utilitarianism and Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics, combining these with Mill’s The Subjection of Women, his Autobiography, and several key essays. Along the way we shall be investigating the views of Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick about animal suffering, women’s equality, and sexual orientation. Among the critics of Utilitarianism, we shall consider writings of Bernard Williams, John Rawls, Amartya Sen, Jon Elster, Elizabeth Anderson, and John Harsanyi. Admission by permission of the instructor. Permission must be sought in writing by September 15. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in philosophy or some equivalent solid philosophy preparation. This is a 500 level course. The grade is based on a final seminar paper of 20-25 pages, an oral seminar presentation, and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Martha Nussbaum
  • When is Political Power Legitimate?

    LAWS 98403 - 01 (2 to 3) c/l, l, m, w, x
    When political power is exercised, what makes it legitimate? Political theorists have long wondered how to justify political rule, which in general is any system whereby certain people get to make decisions on behalf of others and direct them to comply with the decisions, often ensuring their compliance through the threat or use of force. What justification can be provided for the normative standing of such systems of rule? The question of legitimacy is distinct from whether political rule is just or whether it is lawful (exercised according to a constitutional order), although those questions are not entirely separable. In this seminar, we will examine the possible grounds on which we might begin to establish why and how a particular political order is legitimate. We will begin with the paradigmatic case of the state, but we will also look at sub-national and international forms of political rule. We will examine and assess the prominent kinds of answers offered to this question: the common good / social welfare, individual freedom / natural rights, the social contract, and the democratic ideal of equality. Readings will include philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, as well as contemporary theorists such as Hannah Arendt, John Rawls, and Joseph Raz. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and their final option. Students have the option of taking a final exam or submitting a series of thought papers (for two credits), or submitting a set of short research papers or a major research paper (for three credits).
    Spring 2015
    Amanda Greene