Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2015
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (30%) and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2015
    Lawrence Wood
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Complex Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2015
    Erin Kelly
  • Privacy

    LAWS 79501 - 01 (3) x
    This course surveys America’s efforts to draw boundaries between the public and private spheres. The course primarily deals with three types of law: the privacy-related torts, constitutional privacy law, and various federal statutes and regulations that govern the collection, aggregation, and dissemination of private information. Substantive topics of discussion may include Internet privacy; health care and genetic privacy; sexual privacy; the relationship between privacy and the First Amendment; the Fourth Amendment and other restrictions on governmental investigations and surveillance; and European privacy law. The student’s grade is based on an in-class final examination and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Coursework will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Business Organizations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2015
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41016 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course will focus on the rules governing the legal profession and practical applications of the rules. Course materials will include the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and a textbook; we may also read supplemental materials from time to time. Grades will be based on an in-class final exam and a class participation component. This course will fulfill the professional responsibility requirement.
    Spring 2015
    Martha Pacold
  • Professional Responsibility in the Real World

    LAWS 41013 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, addresses real world ethical issues and challenges facing attorneys in private practice and public service. The instructors, members of a major international law firm, will make the rules governing the professional responsibilities of lawyers come alive by discussing a number of examples taken from the headlines and from daily practice. Along the way, the instructors will give meaningful insight into what it's like to practice law in a broad range of practice areas, including transactions, litigation, and public service. Classes will include both a lecture portion and a discussion of practical exercises. Class attendance and participation will be an essential and worthwhile aspect of this course. The student's grade will be based on an examination, a series of short homework exercises, and class participation.
    Winter 2015
    Michael Sweeney, James E. Clark, Teresa Wilton Harmon
  • Project and Infrastructure Development and Finance

    LAWS 42512 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    This seminar is focused on the development and project financing of infrastructure facilities. These transactions feature a wide variety of commercial agreements and financial instruments, legal and financial structuring, and a significant role for lawyers. Public private partnership structures will be examined. Representative transactions, principally in the energy, transportation and public infrastructure sectors, will be selected for analysis and discussion. Infrastructure projects such as these provide a convenient vehicle for discussion of contractual provisions, structuring parameters, financial analysis, and legal practice issues common to a broad range of business and financial transactions. The classes will be discussion oriented; grades will be based on short papers, a case study and class participation. There are no pre-requisites, although basic corporation law would be helpful. The readings will be taken from textbooks, professional journals, and actual commercial and financial contracts. A speaker from the financial community with a wide range of experience is expected. Students wishing to meet the WP requirement must complete a research paper. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
    Autumn 2014
    Martin Jacobson
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter.
    Winter 2015
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination.
    Spring 2015
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on an in-class examination at the conclusion of the Spring quarter. Participation may be taken into account as indicated in the syllabus.
    Winter 2015
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student's grade is based on a single final examination. Participation may be taken into account as indicated in the syllabus.
    Spring 2015
    Lee Fennell
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) +, a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The goal of the course is to enable students to gain hands-on criminal clinical experience, as well as to familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case, including ethical and social justice issues (such as race and poverty) routinely considered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic will provide students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice (through participation in courtroom exercises built around actual criminal cases), and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic is responsible for securing a field placement prior to the beginning of the first day of class in a pre-screened placement program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office. A list of potential placements is available upon request. Field placements will run for both the Winter and Spring quarters (January through May) and will be formally supervised by coordinators within each program’s office. The faculty instructors will monitor the student’s substantive work and performance in conjunction with the field placements. Students must comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, which will be considered part of the course grade. In the clinical placements, students may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. The clinic will be held only if a minimum of nine (9) students secure internships and signup for the course.
    Winter 2015
    Lisa Noller, Gabriel Plotkin
  • Prosecution and Defense Clinic

    LAWS 67713 - 01 (3 to 4) +, a, s
    The Prosecution and Defense Clinic is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the criminal justice system through: (1) a 2-quarter seminar taught by a former Assistant United States Attorney and a former Federal Defender; and, (2) a clinical placement in either a prosecutor’s office or public defender’s office. The goal of the course is to enable students to gain hands-on criminal clinical experience, as well as to familiarize students with the legal procedures and issues which arise in a typical criminal case, including ethical and social justice issues (such as race and poverty) routinely considered by all criminal justice attorneys and courts. The clinic will provide students with a unique combination of substantive criminal law and procedure, ethics, trial practice (through participation in courtroom exercises built around actual criminal cases), and hands-on experience through a clinical placement. Each student in the clinic is responsible for securing a field placement prior to the beginning of the first day of class in a pre-screened placement program with a federal or state prosecutor or defender office. A list of potential placements is available upon request. Field placements will run for both the Winter and Spring quarters (January through May) and will be formally supervised by coordinators within each program’s office. The faculty instructors will monitor the student’s substantive work and performance in conjunction with the field placements. Students must comply with the clinical placement’s requirements regarding hours and assignments, which will be considered part of the course grade. In the clinical placements, students may be expected to research substantive criminal law issues, draft affirmative and responsive pleadings and memos, interview witnesses and clients, assist lawyers with court hearings and where permitted (and with an appropriate 711 license), appear in court under the supervision of practicing attorneys. The clinic will be held only if a minimum of nine (9) students secure internships and signup for the course.
    Spring 2015
    Lisa Noller, Gabriel Plotkin
  • Public Choice

    LAWS 69001 - 01 (3) x
    This course focuses on the relationship between modern perspectives on voting and interest groups on the one hand and legislation and judicial interventions on the other. Public choice is essentially the science of collective decision-making, and it comes with several well developed tools of analysis. With these tools, and that perspective, we revisit the interactions between legislatures and judges, democracy's attempt to solve certain problems, and the roles played by a variety of legal doctrines and constitutional institutions (from takings law to line-item vetoes and to the meaning of precedents). As the course proceeds, we explore specific topics in law, such as the possibility of judicial vote-trading, the role of referenda in some jurisdictions but not others, and the role of precedent itself. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Saul Levmore
  • Public Corruption and the Law

    LAWS 68314 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, w, x
    This seminar will focus on how governments use the law to prevent and catch public corruption, how the law is sometimes used to protect public corruption, and how one should determine the optimal response to corruption and its consequences. We will examine the substantive criminal laws and sentencing schemes used in the best public corruption prosecutions, ranging from RICO and "honest services" fraud to bribery and extortion laws. We will also examine the laws that create, authorize, or prevent the most effective investigative tools used by law enforcement against public corruption, including wiretap laws and related privacy issues. We will study several key topics within public corruption law, including patronage, its effect on democratic institutions, and its status under the First Amendment; campaign finance reform and whether money in campaigns is protected speech or a corrupting influence (or both); and the relationship between transparency, online access to information, and corruption. We will also consider an economic analysis of public corruption, including questions about whether the level of democracy, and the pervasiveness of corruption in the culture, affect the cost-benefit analysis. Constitutional Law I and II are recommended pre-requisites. Students taking the class for 3 credits write one short reaction paper (or short research paper if appropriate), and one major paper. Those taking it for 2 credits write several short reaction papers.
    Spring 2015
    David Hoffman
  • Public International Law

    LAWS 72901 - 01 (3) c/l
    This course is an introduction to public international law, the body of law that governs relations between states. It will cover the basic features of the international legal order, including: the nature and sources of international law; its principal actors, including states, international organizations, individuals and corporations; state responsibility and diplomatic protection; the relationship between international law and U.S. domestic law; and state jurisdiction and immunities. It will also provide an introduction to selected substantive areas: the law of the sea, international criminal law, and the use of force. The course will incorporate discussion of current events, and will consider the interaction of international law and politics. Grades will be based on class participation and an examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Pierre-Hugues Verdier
  • Public Opinion, Public Policy, and the Law

    LAWS 69002 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will explore the intersection of public opinion, public policy, and the law. To date, questions about whether and how public opinion influences public policy have been addressed primarily by political scientists. But these questions are also vital to several legal domains, in particular constitutional law and election law. In the constitutional law context, the mistranslation of public opinion into public policy may be evidence of a political malfunction that requires judicial intervention. In the election law context, one of the most important functions of elections is to align the preferences of the electorate with the policies enacted by their representatives. The seminar will tackle these complex and interesting issues through readings drawn from legal scholarship, political theory, and empirical political science. An effort will also be made to have outside speakers present papers once or twice during the quarter. The grade is based on a final written paper.
    Winter 2015
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Racism, Law, and Social Sciences

    LAWS 54303 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth study of theories and methods for analysis of racialization in past and present societies. Analyses of the social construction of racial and ethnic identities have facilitated studies of the ways in which social differences are created, maintained, and masked. Subjects to be addressed in this seminar include the interrelation of racializing ideologies with other cultural and social dimensions, such as class, ethnicity, gender, political and legal structures, and economic influences. We will also consider the related histories of biological and genetic concepts of different races within the human species as part of the context of our study of racism operating within social processes. The seminar includes a major writing project in the form of a seminar paper. The grade is based on a final written paper (80%) and class participation (20%).
    Winter 2015
    Christopher Fennell
  • Regulation of Sexuality

    LAWS 72201 - 01 (3) +, c/l, r
    This course explores the many ways in which the legal system regulates sexuality, sexual identity, and gender and considers such regulation in a number of substantive areas as well as the limits on placed on such regulation by constitutional guarantees including free speech, equal protection, and due process. Readings include cases and articles from the legal literature together with work by scholars in other fields. The grade is based on a substantial paper, series of short papers, or final examination, with class participation taken into account. Paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates require permission of the instructor. Constitutional Law I, III, and/or IV are recommended but not required prerequisites.
    Spring 2015
    Mary Anne Case