Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2015
    John Rappaport
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2015
    John Rappaport
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2014
    Heather Whitney
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2015
    Heather Whitney
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2015
    Heather Whitney
  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation

    LAWS 44201 - 01 (3) e, x
    Much of lawyers' work today involves the close reading and interpretation of statutes or like texts. The focus of this class is the study of current interpretive theories and their application. The class also encompasses political theory and public choice approaches to the legislative process as they relate to legal interpretation. The class has the aim of bolstering students' capacity to work with statutes in law school and beyond. At the end of the class, students will have a thorough grasp of the process through which statutes are produced by the legislative branch and their interpretation by the courts. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Jennifer Nou
  • Life in the Law

    LAWS 99403 - 01 (2) m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the various definitions and valuations of life across diverse areas of the law. Readings will include seminal cases in reproductive rights, assisted suicide, right-to-die, and capital punishment. Background readings in related areas, i.e., scientific journals, papers, etc. will also be required. The seminar will discuss policy decision-making including actuarial analysis and social, medical and religious values inherent, implicit or ignored in the legal analysis. Students will be required to write three short papers, co-draft a statute in one area of law, and participate in jury deliberations. Grade will also be based on class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Herschella G. Conyers
  • Litigating Financial Disputes

    LAWS 52523 - 01 (3) m, r, s, w, x
    This seminar will explore the practice, theory, and strategy of litigating financial disputes. These disputes include bankruptcy proceedings, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud cases, white collar investigations, and suits alleging the breach of financial contracts. On the practical side, the seminar will explore the procedures for choosing and preparing financial experts to testify on valuation and other issues, interviewing and deposing executive officers and investment bankers, and common discovery issues that arise. On the theoretical side, we will explore critiques of the current systems of litigating these disputes and proposals for reform. In all areas, we will consider the strategic implications that lawyers must take into account both in litigating the disputes and in negotiating agreements in ways to avoid future disputes or reduce the risk of losing a dispute if one arises. In general, we will explore the overlap between litigation and transactional work that is at the heart of these disputes. For example, we will look at cases where litigation positions are used to facilitate leverage in transactions. The seminar materials will be a mix of court opinions, pleadings filed in actual cases, transactional documents, and academic articles. The grade is based on a series of short research papers or a final written paper.
    Spring 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) s, u, w, x
    This simulation class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2015
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Local Government Law

    LAWS 71701 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law regarding the provision of public goods and services at the state and local level. It explores the way in which local government law addresses the issues of what services a local government should provide, which residents should receive those services, who pays for the services provided, and how these decisions are reached. In the process, it explores the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular emphasis on judicial analysis of the constitutional and statutory basis of those relationships. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2015
    Julie Roin
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed fifty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mergers and Acquisitions

    LAWS 42311 - 01 (3) x
    In this course we will examine a number of the important legal and practical issues that arise in connection with mergers and acquisitions of U.S. businesses. These include: (1) the differences between mergers and tender offers, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type of transaction; (2) the duties of directors in change of control transactions; (3) special considerations applicable to transactions, such as controlling shareholder buyouts or management buyouts, in which a director, officer or shareholder has a material conflict of interest; (4) disclosure issues in public M&A transactions; (5) issues that arise in connection with hostile takeovers and takeover defenses; (6) the enforceability of deal protection provisions in public merger agreements; (7) issues that arise in connection with merger, stock purchase, and asset purchase agreements; (8) issues relating to fraud claims brought in M&A transactions; (9) problems that may arise between signing an M&A agreement and the closing or termination of the transaction; and (10) issues that arise in connection with preliminary agreements. The course materials will include relevant judicial decisions as well as examples of disclosure documents and merger, stock purchase and asset purchase agreements. Grades will depend on a final exam and class participation. Some of the topics in this course will also be covered in Buyouts, but that course is not a prerequisite for this course and students may take both courses.
    Winter 2015
    Scott Davis
  • Modern Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41018 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course will explore a variety of legal, ethical and real-world issues commonly faced by modern lawyers in their daily practices. It will address the relationship among the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, the Restatement (Third) of the Law Governing Lawyers, and various common law and statutory sources of the standards that govern the practice of law today. It will focus on several noteworthy professional liability cases involving lawyers and law firms. Course materials will include traditional texts and statutory materials, hypotheticals drawn from unreported matters, as well as the results of jury focus groups and at least one mediation. The course will meet two hours per week and will satisfy the professional liability requirement. The grade will be based on a combination of a proctored, in-class, two hour open-book examination, a short (10 to 12 pages) research paper, and class participation. Although a list of possible research topics will be provided, students will be encouraged to develop and write about their own research topics, subject to final approval by the instructor. Class attendance is required, with class discussion an integral part of the course and critical to a full understanding of the course materials. The class will be capped at 50.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark Nozette
  • Multidistrict Litigation and Complex Class Actions

    LAWS 93603 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar addresses legal and ethical requirements, as well as strategic and practical considerations, around handling multidistrict litigation, including mass tort and complex class actions. Using materials from recent and current cases, the class will discuss topics such as early case assessment, coordination of multijurisdictional litigation, use of dispositive motions, the importance of expert testimony and mechanisms for resolving scientific disputes, resolution options, media coverage of MDLs and bellwether selection methods and trial of bellwether cases. Discussions will involve the Vioxx, Baycol, diet drug, Teflon, and Firestone litigations, among others. Expectations: This class will be taught as a participatory seminar. Students will not be expected to have already taken a complex litigation course, but should be willing to seek out answers to legal questions as they arise. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation and a written paper. Students will need access to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the Manual for Complex Litigation Fourth (http://www.fjc.gov/public/home.nsf/autoframe?openform&url_l=/public/home.nsf/inavg eneral?openpage&url_r=/public/home.nsf/pages/470), the website of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (www.jpml.uscourts.gov), and reading materials that I will email to students each week. Students also will need access to Westlaw and/or Lexis.
    Winter 2015
    Adam Hoeflich
  • National Security Issues and the Development of Legal Practice Skills

    LAWS 70703 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will address current national security issues including presidential power, indefinite incarceration, assassination, electronic surveillance, and cyberwarfare. More than the typical seminar, this class will also focus on helping students develop a range of skills required for successful law practice. Students will form teams of 2-4 persons. Each team will present its analysis of a topic to the class and help facilitate class discussion of the topic. Each team will also submit a short memo on its selected topic. Constitutional Law I or the equivalent is recommended but not required (and can be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2015
    Robert A. Helman
  • Non-Profit Organizations

    LAWS 67802 - 01 (2) +, c/l, m, x
    The financial crisis and increase in political polarization that we have experienced has led to an increase in the role of non-profit organizations in our economy and democratic processes. However, few professionals understand how the rules applicable to non-profit organizations differ from comparable laws that govern the behavior of for-profit entities. This seminar attempts to fill that gap by exploring the tax and non-tax rules applicable to non-profit organizations. Such topics as fiduciary duties, commercial activities, federal and state tax exemptions, charitable deductions, and limits on lobbying and political activities are included. We dwell on the underlying question of why some activities (and not others) are carried out in the non-profit sector and the erosion of the difference between activities conducted by for-profit and non-profit entities. Think of hospitals; both for-profit and non-profit hospitals provide the same services to customers (patients). However, the tax and non-tax rules that apply to the two categories of hospitals are quite different. We examine these differences and consider whether they make sense. Prerequisite: Introductory Income Taxation (may be taken concurrently). The grade is based on a final take-home examination and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    William C. Golden
  • Oil and Gas Law

    LAWS 45301 - 01 (3)
    The basic law relating to the exploration, production, and development of oil and gas. The following principal topics are covered: ownership interests in natural resources, leasing and field development, the classification and transfer of production interests, and regulation of field operation-pooling, unitization, and environmental controls. Taxation and post-production marketing controls are not covered. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final exam.
    Autumn 2014
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Partnership Taxation

    LAWS 44301 - 01 (3) <