Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Spring 2014
    Elizabeth Kregor, Erika Harford
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class.
    Autumn 2013
    Michael Friedman
  • Intensive Trial Practice Workshop

    LAWS 67503 - 01 (3) +, s, u
    This practicum teaches trial preparation, trial advocacy, and strategy through a variety of teaching techniques, including lectures and demonstrations, but primarily through simulated trial exercises. Topics include opening statements, witness preparation, direct and cross examination, expert witnesses, objections at trial, and closing argument. Practicing lawyers and judges are enlisted to provide students with lectures and critiques from varied perspectives. The practicum concludes with a simulated jury trial presided over by sitting state and federal court judges. Open to J.D. students only. Evidence is a prerequisite. Students taking the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop may enroll in Pre-Trial Advocacy. Completion of this workshop partially satisfies one of the requirements for admission to the trial bar of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. This practicum is open only to students entering their 3L year and limited to 48 with preference given to students who have been accepted into a Litigation Clinic course. Students who have taken Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603), Poverty and Housing Law Clinic (LAWS 90512), or Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy (LAWS 91702) may not take this course. The student's grade is based on class participation. This practicum meets daily for approximately six hours, September 16-27. The simulated trial will be on September 28, time TBD.
    Autumn 2013
    Herschella G. Conyers, Erica Zunkel, Craig B. Futterman, Randolph N. Stone
  • International Arbitration

    LAWS 94602 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar gives students a practical foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. With the emergence of the global economy and the explosive growth of cross-border transactions and multinational joint ventures, international arbitration has become the leading mechanism for resolution of international commercial disputes. With parties increasingly unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements are now a mainstay of cross-border commercial transactions. Topics include the crafting of effective international arbitration agreements, the relative advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc UNCITRAL-style arbitration and institutional arbitration (ICC, AAA, etc.), the rules of procedure that govern international arbitration, the difficult procedural issues that commonly arise in international arbitration (such as the availability and extent of discovery, the consolidation of parties and claims, etc.), procedural and substantive issues applicable to investor-state arbitration, the effective presentation of evidence, and the enforcement of international arbitral awards. The student's grade is based upon the quality of preparation for and oral participation in the seminar, as well as the quality of a required research paper.
    Spring 2014
    Alan D'Ambrosio
  • International Finance

    LAWS 48901 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    Today the volume of international financial flows far exceeds the volume of international trade. This seminar addresses the international regulatory aspects of U. S. domestic banking and security markets and contrasts them with foreign markets. The focus is on U.S., European, and other regulatory systems and the role of international financial institutions. In addition to introductory material on U.S. banking and securities regulation, foreign exchange markets, and the growth of Eurocurrency markets, two particularly current topics will be addressed: (1) international regulatory aspects of the recent international financial crisis and (2) changes in U.S. law made or under consideration to respond to that crisis. Special attention will be paid to the "Euro problem" and to Chinese financial markets.
    Winter 2014
    Kenneth W. Dam
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms as well as other substantive law and strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works closely with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, drafting reports, and training manuals. Students work in teams on specific projects and will develop their international research, legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, and strategic thinking skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, as well as discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations, including those involving economic and social rights and women's rights. During the Autumn quarter students should take the International Human Rights Lawyering class where interviewing, cultural competency, strategy in the international context, and other relevant skills will be developed through simulation exercise, assignments, and discussion of case studies. In addition, students are encouraged, but not required to take a course in International Human Rights Law. Some students may have the option (but are not required) to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects during the break between Autumn and Winter Quarter or the break between Winter and Spring Quarter. Students will receive one or two credits each quarter in the International Human Rights Clinic in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Autumn 2013
    Sital Kalantry
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms as well as other substantive law and strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works closely with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals as well as non-litigation projects, such as legislative reform and report research and drafting. Students work in teams on specific projects and develop their international research, legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, and strategic thinking skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, as well as discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations, including those involving economic and social rights and women's rights. Students are encouraged, but not required to take a course in International Human Rights Law. Some students may have the option (but are not required) to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects. Students will receive one or two credits each quarter in the International Human Rights Clinic in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2014
    Sital Kalantry
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally, including in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms as well as other substantive law and strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop solutions to those problems using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works closely with non-governmental organizations to design, collaborate, and implement projects, which include litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals as well as non-litigation projects, such as legislative reform and report research and drafting. Students work in teams on specific projects and develop their international research, legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, collaboration, media advocacy, and strategic thinking skills. Additionally, students will critically examine the substance and application of human rights law, as well as discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally, and develop new techniques to address human rights violations, including those involving economic and social rights and women's rights. Students are encouraged, but not required to take a course in International Human Rights Law. Some students may have the option (but are not required) to undertake international or domestic travel in connection with their projects. Students will receive one or two credits each quarter in the International Human Rights Clinic in accordance with the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2014
    Sital Kalantry
  • International Human Rights Law

    LAWS 96101 - 01 (3) c/l, r, w
    This course is an introduction to international human rights law, covering the major instruments and institutions that operate on the international plane. It includes discussion of the conceptual underpinnings of human rights, the structure of the United Nations System, the major international treaties, regional human rights machinery, and the interplay of national and international systems in enforcing human rights. It will also provide an introduction to international relations theories: When and why do states commit to international human rights standards? And when does international human rights law actually make a difference on the ground? To illustrate these themes, the course will draw when possible on current international events covered in the media.
    Autumn 2013
    Mila Versteeg
  • International Human Rights Lawyering Skills

    LAWS 96203 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    In this seminar, students will learn the tools and develop the skills to conduct international human rights work, including international field-work and fact-gathering, interviewing witnesses and victims of abuses, assessing various litigation and non-litigation strategies, conducting legal research using diverse sources, evaluating successes and challenges, developing cross-cultural competency skills, and the ethical challenges of international work. The grade for the class will be based on class participation, in-class simulation exercises, and short assignments. This seminar is a pre-requisite or co-requisite for students who are or intend to enroll in the International Human Rights Clinic. Enrollment limited to 15 students.
    Autumn 2013
    Sital Kalantry
  • International Litigation in U.S. Courts

    LAWS 93605 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will explore international issues that arise in civil litigation in U.S. courts. We will consider the various procedural issues that arise when courts are presented with foreign parties, foreign conduct, foreign evidence, and foreign states, and the various international and domestic legal sources that govern how U.S. courts must deal with these ever-increasing complexities in civil litigation. Topics will include subject-matter and personal jurisdiction, forum and venue, choice of law, foreign judgments, and foreign states. Grading will be based on a final examination, a presentation and short paper, and class participation.
    Autumn 2013
    Zachary D. Clopton
  • Introductory Income Taxation

    LAWS 44121 - 01 (3) x
    This course provides an introduction to the essential elements of the federal income tax, with a special emphasis on the taxation of individuals. The topics covered include the nature, timing and measurement of income, the role played by "basis" in calculating gain (and loss) in transactions involving property, the boundary between personal and business expenditures, and the use of the tax system to provide behavioral incentives and disincentives. The course stresses the complex interactions between political and administrative concerns in the tax system.
    Autumn 2013
    Julie Roin
  • Introductory Income Taxation

    LAWS 44121 - 01 (3) x
    This class provides an introduction to federal income tax law. Topics covered in this course include (but are not limited to) what constitutes income; deductions; the tax treatment of gains and losses; realization and timing; tax shelters. The class uses a combination of lectures, class discussion and problems, focusing on the application of the Internal Revenue Code, Treasury Regulations, cases, and other sources of tax law. Policy issues underlying the tax law will also be analyzed. This class has no prerequisites.
    Winter 2014
    Dhammika Dharmapala
  • Islamic Law and Finance

    LAWS 80222 - 01 (3) c/l, m, w, x
    This seminar will provide students with an overview of the modern Islamic finance industry. We will review the basic sources of Islamic law and jurisprudence and consider the prohibitions on unjustified increase (riba) and excessive risk (gharar). We will explore the classical rules of Islamic contract and commercial law and their application in the modern context. The growth of the modern Islamic finance industry from the 1970’s to the present will be examined. The main Islamic financial products will be reviewed. We will consider legal questions in structuring transaction documentation. We will explore the ethical underpinnings of Islamic finance and the social justice questions highlighted by the intersection of religion and finance. Regulatory issues will be discussed. We will also consider the political environment in which Islamic finance currently operates. The seminar is intended to familiarize students with the essential legal framework of the rapidly emerging market for highly technical and sophisticated Islamic financial products.
    Autumn 2013
    Cynthia Shawamreh
  • Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication

    LAWS 47411 - 01 (3) e, x
    An examination of classic jurisprudential questions in and around the theory of adjudication: the theory of how judges actually do decide cases and how they ought to decide them. These questions include: Do legal rules really constrain judicial decision-making? What makes a rule (or norm) a rule of the legal system? Are principles of morality legally binding even when such principles have not been enacted into a law by a legislature? (Relatedly, are there objective principles of morality?) When no legal norm controls a case, how ought judges to decide that case? Can there be right answers to legal disputes, even when informed judges and lawyers disagree about the answer? Are there principles or methods of legal reasoning that constrain judicial decision-making, or is legal reasoning essentially indeterminate, such that a skillful judge can justify more than one outcome for any given dispute? Is judicial decision-making really distinct from political decision-making of the sort legislators engage in? Readings drawn exclusively from major twentieth-century schools of thought - especially American Legal Realism (e.g., Karl Llewellyn, Jerome Frank), Natural Law (e.g., Ronald Dworkin, John Finnis), and Legal Positivism (e.g., H.L.A. Hart, Joseph Raz) - supplemented by other pertinent readings (from Leslie Green, Richard Posner, and the instructor, among others). No familiarity with either jurisprudence or philosophy will be presupposed, though some readings will be philosophically demanding, and the course will sometimes venture into (and explain) cognate philosophical issues in philosophy of language and metaethics as they are relevant to the core jurisprudential questions. Attendance at the first session is mandatory for those who want to enroll. Take-home essay exam.
    Spring 2014
    Brian Leiter
  • Kapnick Initiative Leadership Effectiveness and Development Lab I: Development

    LAWS 75710 - 01 (3) +, c/l
    This is the first of a two-course series that develops the self-awareness and effectiveness of the student (facilitator) at influencing, motivating, and developing people. The series is experiential in nature. Its two distinct components are: Development (LAWS 75710, see below) and Implementation (see LAWS 75711). Facilitators spend the Spring quarter developing self-awareness and the influencing, public speaking, facilitating, coaching and mentoring skills essential to leadership and to their ability to run the LEAD component of the Kapnick Initiative effectively in the Autumn quarter. Within their designated four-person squad, facilitators select specialties in order to devise and master the source material with the depth of understanding necessary to facilitate classroom discussions on key leadership topics. The Spring quarter will culminate in a ‘preview day’ where facilitators will have the opportunity to deliver their sessions before a live audience to help calibrate for the Autumn quarter. Students do not need to bid for this course. Interested students apply during Autumn quarter of their 2L year and undergo an extensive application process from which successful applicants are invited to participate. Students are assessed on both their ability to develop the requisite knowledge and skills to run the program and their effectiveness at doing so. A substantial component of the grade comes from feedback that facilitators are expected to give to and receive from other facilitators. Class attendance in both Spring and Autumn quarters is mandatory. Cannot be taken Pass/Fail. Numerical grade issued at the end of the Spring quarter.
    Spring 2014
    Stacey Kole
  • Labor History and the Law

    LAWS 92103 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the historical relationship between American workers and the law. It focuses on legal contests over workers’ rights in the courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies during the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings explore the ways in which law has shaped labor solidarity, class formation, and strategies for organization and resistance. They also consider the influence of organized labor and of labor law on mobilization for social change, including the movements for civil liberties and civil rights. The seminar concludes by exploring current trends in American labor relations, including recent efforts to curtail the collective bargaining rights of public employees.
    Autumn 2013
    Laura Weinrib
  • Labor Law

    LAWS 43101 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the statutory, administrative, and judicial law governing collective labor relations. The principal subjects are union organizing and collective bargaining, with particular attention to the National Labor Relations Act. Students consider the strategies adopted by labor groups, employers, and legal actors in response to evolving economic and social conditions. The course draws on historical and comparative perspectives to evaluate emerging alternatives to the existing labor law regime. Grading is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Laura Weinrib
  • Land Use

    LAWS 61301 - 01 (3)
    Few areas of law have as immediate an impact on our lived environment than the law of land use. This course will provide a broad introduction to the theory, doctrine, and history of land use regulation. Topics will include zoning, homeowners’ associations, nuisance, suburban sprawl, eminent domain and regulatory takings. Throughout, we will discuss the ways land use regulation affects important human values, such as economic efficiency, distributive justice, social relations, and the environment. Readings will be drawn from the leading cases as well as commentary by scholars in the fields of law, architecture, and planning. Grades will be based on performance on an eight-hour take-home exam as well as class participation.
    Spring 2014
    Eduardo Peñalver
  • Law and Advances in Medicine

    LAWS 93302 - 01 (3) c/l, m, w, x
    This seminar will address the intersection of medicine, science, and law, focusing on issues related to human research, informed consent, the "new genetics," and other advances in biotechnology. Enrollment is limited to 10 students. Students will write a significant research paper, submitted in three stages, which can be used to satisfy the Writing Project requirement and which will count for 50 percent of the grade. Papers for non-graduating students seeking to meet the WP graduation requirement are due the first day of Autumn 2014. The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on class participation.
    Spring 2014
    Julie Gage Palmer