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Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan S. Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan S. Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 (1) a, x
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 (1) a, x
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 (1) a, x
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Empire in Historical Perspective

    LAWS 95902 - 04 (1) a, x
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be led by professors Alison LaCroix (law) and Jennifer Pitts (political science), will focus on recent works examining the law and politics of empire from the early modern period through the early twentieth century. Empires present particular problems of constitutional law, in particular the relationship between center and periphery. They are arenas in which conceptions of sovereignty, authority, and regulation are created and fought over. They are also sites of conflict over membership, commerce, and the rights of colonized peoples. We will read works by historians, political scientists, and legal scholars that situate these issues in the context of particular empires, in both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Three seats are reserved for non-law students. Prospective students who are not law students should send to both instructors a brief statement indicating their reasons for interest in the course. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Alison L. LaCroix, Jennifer Pitts
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Empire in Historical Perspective

    LAWS 95902 - 04 a
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be led by professors Alison LaCroix (law) and Jennifer Pitts (political science), will focus on recent works examining the law and politics of empire from the early modern period through the early twentieth century. Empires present particular problems of constitutional law, in particular the relationship between center and periphery. They are arenas in which conceptions of sovereignty, authority, and regulation are created and fought over. They are also sites of conflict over membership, commerce, and the rights of colonized peoples. We will read works by historians, political scientists, and legal scholars that situate these issues in the context of particular empires, in both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Alison L. LaCroix, Jennifer Pitts
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Empire in Historical Perspective

    LAWS 95902 - 04 a
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be led by professors Alison LaCroix (law) and Jennifer Pitts (political science), will focus on recent works examining the law and politics of empire from the early modern period through the early twentieth century. Empires present particular problems of constitutional law, in particular the relationship between center and periphery. They are arenas in which conceptions of sovereignty, authority, and regulation are created and fought over. They are also sites of conflict over membership, commerce, and the rights of colonized peoples. We will read works by historians, political scientists, and legal scholars that situate these issues in the context of particular empires, in both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Alison L. LaCroix, Jennifer Pitts
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Psychology in Popular Media

    LAWS 95902 - 13 (1) a, x
    The seminar explores legal problems that lie in the intersection of ethics and psychology. The co-instructor, Boaz Keysar, is a Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Chicago. In preparation to each meeting, students will be asked to watch a movie that raises a set of specific ethical/psychological problems . The movies include The Stanford Prison Experiment, A Few Good Men, Inside Job, and others. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar, Boaz Keysar
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Psychology in Popular Media

    LAWS 95902 - 13 a
    The seminar explores legal problems that lie in the intersection of ethics and psychology. The co-instructor, Boaz Keysar, is a Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Chicago. In preparation to each meeting, students will be asked to watch a movie that raises a set of specific ethical/psychological problems . The movies include The Stanford Prison Experiment, A Few Good Men, Inside Job, and others. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar, Boaz Keysar
  • Greenberg Seminar: Meritocracy?

    LAWS 95902 - 10 (1) a, x
    What does a meritocracy look like? Is it related to democracy – and, if so, how do Chinese or other forms of meritocracy differ from ours? By the third seminar we will move to sports (pure meritocracy, it would seem – but what about accommodating disabilities and what of artificial enhancements that are against the rules?). Does the law regarding employment tests, not to mention law school itself, fit common sense notions of meritocracy? Are markets meritocratic or is that something different? If these questions interest you, then please join us (subject to registration space), but be sure your Thursday evenings are free in the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Credit may not be allocated to Spring. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Saul Levmore, Julie A. Roin
  • Greenberg Seminar: Meritocracy?

    LAWS 95902 - 10 a
    What does a meritocracy look like? Is it related to democracy – and, if so, how do Chinese or other forms of meritocracy differ from ours? By the third seminar we will move to sports (pure meritocracy, it would seem – but what about accommodating disabilities and what of artificial enhancements that are against the rules?). Does the law regarding employment tests, not to mention law school itself, fit common sense notions of meritocracy? Are markets meritocratic or is that something different? If these questions interest you, then please join us (subject to registration space), but be sure your Thursday evenings are free in the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Credit may not be allocated to Spring. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Saul Levmore, Julie A. Roin
  • Greenberg Seminar: Plutocracy

    LAWS 95902 - 09 (1) a, x
    Plutocracy means “rule by the wealthy.” It is firmly rejected by modern democratic principles, yet over the last decade influential commentators have argued that plutocracy has reappeared around the world, including in the United States and Europe. We will discuss whether plutocracy really exists, and if it does, why, and what can be done about. Our tentative reading list includes Jeffrey Winters, Oligarchy; Scott Radnitz, Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia; Chrystia Freeland, Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else; David Rothkopf, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They Are Making; and Robert Frank, Richistan: A Journey Through the American Wealth Boom and the Lives of the New Rich. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Eric A. Posner, David A. Weisbach
  • Greenberg Seminar: Plutocracy

    LAWS 95902 - 09 a
    Plutocracy means “rule by the wealthy.” It is firmly rejected by modern democratic principles, yet over the last decade influential commentators have argued that plutocracy has reappeared around the world, including in the United States and Europe. We will discuss whether plutocracy really exists, and if it does, why, and what can be done about. Our tentative reading list includes Jeffrey Winters, Oligarchy; Scott Radnitz, Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia; Chrystia Freeland, Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else; David Rothkopf, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They Are Making; and Robert Frank, Richistan: A Journey Through the American Wealth Boom and the Lives of the New Rich. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Eric A. Posner, David A. Weisbach