Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • From Caliphate to Nation State: A Survey of Modern Muslim Constitutional Thought

    LAWS 80232 - 01 (3) l, m, x
    This seminar will review the contemporary debates around the role of Islamic Law in modern political and legal systems. The primary objective of the seminar will be to give the student a basic understanding of Islamic legal theory and the challenges modern Muslim nation states face in addressing the role of Islamic Law. The seminar will focus on the constitutional law issues regarding sources of law, religious freedom, public interest, and related issues in Muslim majority countries as well as review the debates around the application of Islamic Law in Muslim minority states. Current political debates around Shari’ah law will be assessed against Islamic legal theory and constitutional law, specifically in light of the “Arab Spring” revolutions and the phenomena of violent extremism such as ISIS. As such, in addition to a theoretical understanding of Islamic Law in the modern context, students will also develop an understanding of the practical impact of legal theory on political, social, and economic realities in the Muslim world and beyond. This is a one-quarter seminar for 2L and 3L students. There are no pre-requisite courses required in Islam. Weekly readings will be assigned in English language source materials. The seminar will draw on the lecturer’s extensive personal experience with the subject matter and knowledge of the legal systems of Muslim majority states such as Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE, Pakistan, Egypt, Malaysia, and elsewhere. Professor Kamran Bajwa studied classical Islamic Law and Islamic Theology at the Al-Azhar seminary in Cairo, Egypt prior to attending the University of Michigan Law School where he also took advanced courses in Islamic Law. Professor Bajwa currently heads the Middle East regional practice for the law firm of Kirkland & Ellis and has served as an advisor to major Islamic scholars and political leaders throughout the Muslim world involved in legal reform and intellectual projects. Grading will be based on a group presentation to the class on sub-topic of students' choice, a short 10-12 page research paper, and class participation and attendance.
    Autumn 2015
    Kamran S. Bajwa
  • Frontiers of Consumer Protection Law

    LAWS 57503 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, x
    What do student loans, television advertisements, and telemarketing all have in common? Consumer protection law. This large and critically important body of law impacts everyday life in ways that are often unappreciated. Congress, state legislatures, agencies, and consumers are actively involved today in shaping consumer protection in response to new technologies, financial instruments, and marketing strategies. In this seminar, students will learn the history and theory of consumer protection law and evaluate its effectiveness. They will be introduced to the law associated with product warranties, predatory lending, and debt collection practices. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and a series of reaction papers (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a short research paper (10-15 pages) in addition to the rest of the coursework.
    Spring 2016
    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi
  • Frontiers of Corporate Law

    LAWS 42306 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    We will read cases, academic articles (from lawyers, economists, and business academics), and books on current issues in corporate law. The seminar will build on the foundational corporate law or business associations course, by examining issues at the cutting edge of corporate governance Grades will be based on a series of short essays responding to the readings. Prerequisite: Corporations or Business Organizations.
    Autumn 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys

    LAWS 79112 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will teach the basic fundamentals of accounting to better prepare you to recognize and understand financial business issues related to the practice of law. Topics include key accounting concepts, reading financial statements and financial statement analysis. The class sessions will include guest speakers presenting on current accounting topics such as Sarbanes Oxley, working with the SEC and forensic accounting (investigating accounting frauds). The class is designed for those who have never taken an accounting class and/or have little financial background. There are no prerequisites but you should not take this class if you have taken an accounting class before or if you have experience in finance or accounting. Grades will be based on homework, papers, and a final examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Philip Bach, Sean Young
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing discrimination and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and writing assignments. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Winter 2016
    Neha Lall
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing discrimination and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and writing assignments. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Spring 2016
    Neha Lall
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 (1) a, x
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 (1) a, x
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 (1) a, x
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Great American Cities

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    We plan to read one book per session (mostly nonfiction), each about a different American city, and each illuminating a different aspect of urban policy (e.g., housing, crime, courts, corruption, etc.). The idea is to learn about broad urban policy issues while also being exposed to the idiosyncratic details of individual cities. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    John Rappaport, Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 (1) a, x
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Iran

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    Iran is a country that is frequently discussed, but rarely understood. This Greenberg seminar will focus on developing a greater understanding of the culture, domestic politics, and foreign affairs of Iran, as well as its position in the broader Middle East. Sessions will focus on what life is like within Iran, how Iran's government functions, US-Iran relations, and the way that Iran shapes the politics of the middle east. The seminar will use a combination of books and films to explore these themes. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2016
    Adam Chilton, Tom Ginsburg
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Empire in Historical Perspective

    LAWS 95902 - 04 (1) a, x
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be led by professors Alison LaCroix (law) and Jennifer Pitts (political science), will focus on recent works examining the law and politics of empire from the early modern period through the early twentieth century. Empires present particular problems of constitutional law, in particular the relationship between center and periphery. They are arenas in which conceptions of sovereignty, authority, and regulation are created and fought over. They are also sites of conflict over membership, commerce, and the rights of colonized peoples. We will read works by historians, political scientists, and legal scholars that situate these issues in the context of particular empires, in both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Three seats are reserved for non-law students. Prospective students who are not law students should send to both instructors a brief statement indicating their reasons for interest in the course. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Alison LaCroix, Jennifer Pitts
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and Empire in Historical Perspective

    LAWS 95902 - 04 a
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be led by professors Alison LaCroix (law) and Jennifer Pitts (political science), will focus on recent works examining the law and politics of empire from the early modern period through the early twentieth century. Empires present particular problems of constitutional law, in particular the relationship between center and periphery. They are arenas in which conceptions of sovereignty, authority, and regulation are created and fought over. They are also sites of conflict over membership, commerce, and the rights of colonized peoples. We will read works by historians, political scientists, and legal scholars that situate these issues in the context of particular empires, in both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2016
    Alison LaCroix, Jennifer Pitts