Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection papers. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Winter 2015
    Neha Lall
  • Gendered Violence and the Law Clinic

    LAWS 63313 - 01 (3 to 4) a, s
    When confronted with domestic and sexual violence in our communities, arrest and prosecution of the perpetrator is only one of many potential legal responses. What other legal tools are available to survivors and how useful are those tools? Students will explore these issues through a 2-hour weekly seminar, combined with 12 hours per week of field work spent working at the civil legal services office of LAF. Students will work primarily on family law and immigration cases, while accepting some assignments from LAF’s other practice areas where the legal rights of survivors of gendered violence are implicated. Students will assist with representation of domestic and sexual violence survivors to meet a broad range of legal needs, which could include protective orders, divorce and custody litigation, VAWA self-petitions and U-Visa applications, advocacy in child abuse and neglect proceedings, housing and eviction matters, unemployment insurance hearings, and public benefits appeals. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, develop witness statements, conduct legal research, and draft pleadings, motions and court orders. Students eligible for a 711 license may appear in court under attorney supervision. Prior experience and language skills may be considered in determining each student’s clinical placement. Students’ grades will be based on participation and case presentations in the seminar, performance in the clinical field work, and a series of reaction/reflection papers. Students will also participate in a simulated hearing at the end of the course. Participation over both Winter and Spring quarters is required.
    Spring 2015
    Neha Lall
  • Global Inequality

    LAWS 92403 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    Global income and wealth are highly concentrated. The richest 2% of the population own about half of the global assets. Per capita income in the United States is around $47,000 and in Europe it is around $30,500, while in India it is $3,400 and in Congo, it is $329. There are equally unsettling inequalities in longevity, health, and education. In this class, we ask what duties nations and individuals have to address these inequalities and what are the best strategies for doing so. What role must each country play in helping itself? What is the role of international agreements and agencies, of NGOs, and of corporations in addressing global poverty? How do we weigh policies that emphasize growth against policies that emphasize within-country equality, health, or education? In seeking answers to these questions, the class will combine readings on the law and economics of global development with readings on the philosophy of global justice. A particular focus will be on the role that legal institutions, both domestic and international, play in discharging these duties. For, example, we might focus on how a nation with natural resources can design legal institutions to ensure they are exploited for the benefit of the citizens of the country. Students will be expected to write a paper, which may qualify for substantial writing credit. Non-law students are welcome but need permission of the instructors, since space is limited.
    Winter 2015
    Martha Nussbaum, David A. Weisbach
  • Government Litigation

    LAWS 52503 - 01 (3) m, x
    The United States government is a party in about one-fifth of civil cases filed in federal courts. Similarly, state and local governments are routine civil litigants in state courts. This seminar explores issues that arise in civil cases in which government actors are plaintiffs or defendants. Topics covered will include sovereign immunity, legislative and executive standing, government preclusion, and attorney fees, as well as major regimes of government liability (e.g., Federal Tort Claims Act, Tucker Act, Bivens and Section 1983, and parens patriae litigation). This seminar also covers statutes under which private parties may sue on behalf of the government, most prominently the False Claims Act. Finally, this seminar will consider professional responsibility issues particular to government litigation. Grading will be based on a paper, a presentation, and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Zachary D. Clopton
  • Greenberg Seminar: 1968

    LAWS 95902 - 08 (1) a, x
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be taught by Geoffrey Stone and Jane Dailey (History Department), will explore the extraordinary events and historical significance of the year 1968. Using a range of materials, including art, literature, music, film, and historical sources, we will touch upon such events as the student takeover of Columbia University and the radical student movement; the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement; the growth of the Black Power movement; the emergence of the Women's Liberation Movement; the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy; Prague Spring; the 1968 Democratic Convention; the 1968 presidential election and its consequences. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Geoffrey R. Stone, Jane Dailey
  • Greenberg Seminar: 1968

    LAWS 95902 - 08 a
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be taught by Geoffrey Stone and Jane Dailey (History Department), will explore the extraordinary events and historical significance of the year 1968. Using a range of materials, including art, literature, music, film, and historical sources, we will touch upon such events as the student takeover of Columbia University and the radical student movement; the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement; the growth of the Black Power movement; the emergence of the Women's Liberation Movement; the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy; Prague Spring; the 1968 Democratic Convention; the 1968 presidential election and its consequences. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone, Jane Dailey
  • Greenberg Seminar: 1968

    LAWS 95902 - 08 a
    This Greenberg Seminar, which will be taught by Geoffrey Stone and Jane Dailey (History Department), will explore the extraordinary events and historical significance of the year 1968. Using a range of materials, including art, literature, music, film, and historical sources, we will touch upon such events as the student takeover of Columbia University and the radical student movement; the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement; the growth of the Black Power movement; the emergence of the Women's Liberation Movement; the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy; Prague Spring; the 1968 Democratic Convention; the 1968 presidential election and its consequences. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone, Jane Dailey
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 04 (1) a, x
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 04 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Criminal Justice and Medical Ethics in Literature

    LAWS 95902 - 04 a
    Students in this seminar will read and discuss literature that relates to the respective disciplines of Professor Alison Siegler and of her father, Professor Mark Siegler of the Medical School. We will study selected criminal justice topics and medical ethics issues through the lens of novels, plays, and other primary sources. We will also explore the centrality of storytelling in lawyering and doctoring. Topics will include mens rea in Capote; sentencing in Shakespeare; end-of-life decision-making in Tolstoy; and crime, punishment, and ethics in Dylan’s music. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Alison Siegler, Mark Siegler
  • Greenberg Seminar: Democracy’s Limits

    LAWS 95902 - 10 (1) a, x
    Twenty years ago Francis Fukuyama declared democracy to be triumphant, heralding the “end of history.” Today, Fukuyama's prediction contrasts with a retreat from democracy in Asia and Africa, and democracies in deep economic turmoil in Europe (and, arguably, the US). This Greenberg explores the state of democracy today, drawing on critiques mustered by economists and political scientists as well as looking at case studies from the US to India. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Aziz Huq, Adam Chilton
  • Greenberg Seminar: Democracy’s Limits

    LAWS 95902 - 10 a
    Twenty years ago Francis Fukuyama declared democracy to be triumphant, heralding the “end of history.” Today, Fukuyama's prediction contrasts with a retreat from democracy in Asia and Africa, and democracies in deep economic turmoil in Europe (and, arguably, the US). This Greenberg explores the state of democracy today, drawing on critiques mustered by economists and political scientists as well as looking at case studies from the US to India. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Aziz Huq, Adam Chilton
  • Greenberg Seminar: Democracy’s Limits

    LAWS 95902 - 10 a
    Twenty years ago Francis Fukuyama declared democracy to be triumphant, heralding the “end of history.” Today, Fukuyama's prediction contrasts with a retreat from democracy in Asia and Africa, and democracies in deep economic turmoil in Europe (and, arguably, the US). This Greenberg explores the state of democracy today, drawing on critiques mustered by economists and political scientists as well as looking at case studies from the US to India. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Aziz Huq, Adam Chilton
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and the Literature of the British Empire

    LAWS 95902 - 01 (1) +, a
    This seminar will read fiction written during and about the British Empire, with a particular, though not exclusive, focus on India. Authors read will include John Buchan, H. Rider Haggard, Rabindranath Tagore, E. M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, Mulk Raj Anand, George Orwell, and J. G. Farrell. Students interested in participating should send Prof. Nussbaum a short statement giving your reasons for your interest in the seminar and telling us about your background in literature and relevant parts of history. This seminar is capped at 12. Approximately 10 seats will be allocated to J.D. students and the rest to LL.M. students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Martha Nussbaum, Dipesh Chakrabarty
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and the Literature of the British Empire

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    This seminar will read fiction written during and about the British Empire, with a particular, though not exclusive, focus on India. Authors read will include John Buchan, H. Rider Haggard, Rabindranath Tagore, E. M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, Mulk Raj Anand, George Orwell, and J. G. Farrell. Students interested in participating should send Prof. Nussbaum a short statement giving your reasons for your interest in the seminar and telling us about your background in literature and relevant parts of history. This seminar is capped at 15. Approximately 10 seats will be allocated to J.D. students and the rest to LL.M. students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Martha Nussbaum, Dipesh Chakrabarty
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law and the Literature of the British Empire

    LAWS 95902 - 01 a
    This seminar will read fiction written during and about the British Empire, with a particular, though not exclusive, focus on India. Authors read will include John Buchan, H. Rider Haggard, Rabindranath Tagore, E. M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, Mulk Raj Anand, George Orwell, and J. G. Farrell. Students interested in participating should send Prof. Nussbaum a short statement giving your reasons for your interest in the seminar and telling us about your background in literature and relevant parts of history. This seminar is capped at 12. Approximately 10 seats will be allocated to J.D. students and the rest to LL.M. students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Martha Nussbaum, Dipesh Chakrabarty
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law Docs

    LAWS 95902 - 03 (1) a, x
    This Greenberg Seminar will involve discussion of notable documentary films with some connection to law. Participants will view the films (through Netflix for example) and then meet to discuss the films on five Thursday evenings during the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Likely films include The Art of the Steal (the story of the Barnes Foundation art collection and the fight to undo provisions in the original bequest); Capturing the Friedmans (credibility of witnesses in a case alleging sex abuse of young children); The Central Park Five (New York’s criminal justice system dealing with a racially charged crime); Portrait of Wally (legal battle over painting stolen by Nazis); West of Memphis (innocence on death row in Arkansas); Big Boys Gone Bananas (corporate campaign to prevent film-makers from showing their documentary about a lawsuit against the company). Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Saul Levmore, Julie Roin
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law Docs

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    This Greenberg Seminar will involve discussion of notable documentary films with some connection to law. Participants will view the films (through Netflix for example) and then meet to discuss the films on five Thursday evenings during the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Likely films include The Art of the Steal (the story of the Barnes Foundation art collection and the fight to undo provisions in the original bequest); Capturing the Friedmans (credibility of witnesses in a case alleging sex abuse of young children); The Central Park Five (New York’s criminal justice system dealing with a racially charged crime); Portrait of Wally (legal battle over painting stolen by Nazis); West of Memphis (innocence on death row in Arkansas); Big Boys Gone Bananas (corporate campaign to prevent film-makers from showing their documentary about a lawsuit against the company). Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Saul Levmore, Julie Roin
  • Greenberg Seminar: Law Docs

    LAWS 95902 - 03 a
    This Greenberg Seminar will involve discussion of notable documentary films with some connection to law. Participants will view the films (through Netflix for example) and then meet to discuss the films on five Thursday evenings during the Autumn and Winter Quarters. Likely films include The Art of the Steal (the story of the Barnes Foundation art collection and the fight to undo provisions in the original bequest); Capturing the Friedmans (credibility of witnesses in a case alleging sex abuse of young children); The Central Park Five (New York’s criminal justice system dealing with a racially charged crime); Portrait of Wally (legal battle over painting stolen by Nazis); West of Memphis (innocence on death row in Arkansas); Big Boys Gone Bananas (corporate campaign to prevent film-makers from showing their documentary about a lawsuit against the company). Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Saul Levmore, Julie Roin
  • Greenberg Seminar: Legal Themes in the Theater

    LAWS 95902 - 09 (1) a, x
    This Greenberg seminar, run with the artistic director of the Court Theater, Charles Newell, will explore how legal themes, such as conflict, and resolution, revenge, the state versus the individual, and the nature of authority, are explored in plays and theater. Most sessions will involve discussing one or more plays that explore a particular legal theme, sometimes exploring how the same theme is portrayed in different time periods and cultures. Pairings might include plays such as The Eueminides, MoLaRa (a South African reinterpretation of the Oresteia) and Death and the Maiden. Other plays (not yet set) may include plays such as Antigone, Measure for Measure, The Merchant of Venice, The Cain Mutiny, Inherit the Wind, All My Sons, and The Man in the Glass Booth. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    David A. Weisbach, Charles Newell