Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Autumn 2013
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Winter 2014
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Spring 2014
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) +
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, direct and collateral review of state-court decisions, and other doctrines. There are no prerequisites other than Civil Procedure II, although Constitutional Law I will be useful. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2014
    William Baude
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) +
    This course will consider the functioning of the federal courts in our larger federal system. Particular attention will be paid to doctrinal questions pertinent to those intending to litigate in federal court or serve as federal law clerks. It is recommended that students take Constitutional Law I before taking this class. The student's grade is based on a proctored final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Aziz Huq
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two 2013 Supreme Court cases: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year.
    Spring 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal district court and the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and to write briefs to the United States Supreme Court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of the arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two Supreme Court cases last year: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet regularly with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year; students are limited to 3 credits during 2L year to preserve credits for 3L year.
    Autumn 2013
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. We filed amicus briefs in two 2013 Supreme Court cases: Alleyne v. United States, No. 11-9335, and United States v. Davila, No. 12-167. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in our appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and Professor Siegler’s Federal Criminal Procedure course; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Erica Zunkel’s Federal Sentencing seminar during 2L year, and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC gives priority to 3Ls but is also open to 2Ls. Students typically apply 6 credits to the clinic during 3L year.
    Winter 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Federal Criminal Practice

    LAWS 47502 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar, taught by two former Assistant United States Attorneys in Chicago and a litigation associate who focuses on white collar criminal defense work, will expand students' knowledge of the scope and application of federal criminal law, and will challenge students to think and act as practicing prosecutors and defense attorneys. The seminar will review five major areas of federal criminal law: (1) the role and scope of the federal criminal system; (2) narcotics and money laundering prosecutions; (3) the use of informants; (4) public corruption and mail fraud; and, (5) racketeering. Students will gain a working knowledge of the relevant case law on these topics, and will also review actual cases prosecuted in federal court in the Northern District of Illinois. This seminar is unique in that it will incorporate a practical component into the last four of these subject areas, including: writing and arguing a motion to suppress and a motion to dismiss, and writing and arguing an opening statement and closing argument. These practical exercises will be based on actual cases brought in federal court, and will give students an opportunity to represent both the government and the defendant. Because of the practical component, class size will be strictly limited to 12 students. Students will submit for grading two written exercises (a motion to suppress, and a motion to dismiss), and will present or argue one of these assignments as well as either an opening or closing statement. These two written and two oral exercises will provide most of the basis for their grade. The two writings, up to ten pages each, will form the basis for 40 percent of each student's grade. The two practical exercises will form the basis for 40 percent of each student's grade. Lastly, to foster discussion on every topic covered, class participation will comprise 20 percent of each student's grade.
    Spring 2014
    Daniel Rubinstein, John Lausch, Shannon T. Murphy
  • Federal Criminal Procedure: From Bail to Jail

    LAWS 47301 - 01 (3) x
    This course surveys the federal criminal process from the formal filing of charges in court through trial and beyond. While Criminal Procedure I examines the procedural rules that govern police investigations, this course examines the procedural rules that govern the criminal process after an arrest. (This course is not called “Criminal Procedure II” because there are no prerequisites and it is not related to Criminal Procedure I.) The law that governs after formal proceedings have commenced is based largely on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and on the Fifth and Sixth Amendments, but is less doctrinal and constitutional than the law that governs during the investigative stage of a case. Topics include: pretrial release and detention, the preliminary hearing, the grand jury, the charging instrument, joinder and severance, discovery, selected trial issues (including confrontation rights), plea bargaining and negotiation, and sentencing. We also examine prosecutorial discretion and ethical issues surrounding the representation of criminal defendants. Various guest speakers typically visit class, including federal district court judges, an Assistant United States Attorney, and a criminal defense lawyer. The final grade is based on an eight-hour take-home examination.
    Autumn 2013
    Alison Siegler
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) x
    This course will consider the federal rules governing the issuance of securities (both equity and debt) by corporations. Special emphasis will be placed on interpreting two federal statutes and a body of rules promulgated by the administrative agency responsible for regulating public securities markets.
    Winter 2014
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) +
    The securities laws govern the way in which a company may raise, and seek to raise, capital; they also impose substantial ongoing obligations upon companies and their security holders in both private and public contexts. Accordingly, the aim of this course is to provide a basic working knowledge of the securities laws to soon-to-be lawyers who will find themselves advising clients that seek to raise (or have raised) either public or private capital. The course will analyze methods of regulation (and possible alternative methods), the financial/institutional context in which the securities regulations exist, and the application of these regulations to real-world situations. Corporation Law/Business Associations I/Business Organizations is a prerequisite, although it may be taken concurrently. LLM students who have completed comparable work in a prior JD degree may register by contacting the registrar. Grades will be based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Thomas J. Miles
  • Federal Sentencing: Balancing Judicial and Prosecutorial Discretion

    LAWS 47602 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The Supreme Court has dramatically changed the federal sentencing landscape in recent years, making federal sentencing the least settled and most dynamic area of federal criminal jurisprudence. This seminar examines the recent federal sentencing revolution in the context of the history of federal sentencing. We study the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and recent Supreme Court cases that try to define the Guidelines’ proper role in sentencing. A central focus of the seminar is the ongoing struggle to balance judicial discretion and prosecutorial discretion, and the fundamental tension this creates between the executive branch and the judiciary. The seminar also focuses on the debate over sentencing disparities. Reading materials are varied and include Supreme Court and lower court cases, the United States Sentencing Guidelines, law review articles, Sentencing Commission studies and reports, and Department of Justice internal directives. Various guest speakers will visit class, including a federal district court judge and an Assistant United States Attorney. Each student is expected to research and write a 20-25 page paper in response to a specific assignment. Students will be graded based on their written submissions and class participation. Second-year students interested in participating in the Federal Criminal Justice Clinic during their 3L year are encouraged to enroll in this seminar, although it is not a prerequisite or corequisite for the clinic.
    Spring 2014
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler
  • Federal Tax Policy Seminar

    LAWS 55801 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    This seminar will examine selected topics of current interest in federal tax policy. The exact mix of topics will depend (at least in part) on tax legislation under consideration by Congress. Students will be graded on a combination of class participation and five short reaction papers.
    Winter 2014
    Julie Roin
  • Feminist Economics and Public Policy

    LAWS 70502 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will explore advances in feminist economics and the implications for public policy in local and global communities. Drawing from feminist economics research, the seminar will address the persistence of gender inequality in societies around the world and proposed policy solutions. Topics will include gender relations and the organization of domestic and market work, violence against women, workplace and pay equality, gendered access to resources, education, and healthcare, and gender and property rights. Grades will be based on a series of short research papers and class participation.
    Spring 2014
    Diana Strassmann
  • Food and Drug Law

    LAWS 94501 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course explores legal and policy issues in the federal regulation of foods, drugs, medical devices, and other products coming within the jurisdiction of the FDA. It will examine substantive standards applicable to these products and procedural issues in the enforcement of these standards. It will also address the tension between state and federal regulation in this area, constitutional constraints on such regulation, and a variety of other issues relating to the development and marketing of regulated products. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or major paper.
    Spring 2014
    Jack Bierig
  • Foreign Relations Law

    LAWS 97801 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of American foreign relations. Topics include the allocation of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements and the power to declare and conduct war. The course will also focus on the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases. Where relevant, current events will be explored, such as ongoing controversies regarding individual rights during wartime, the post-September 11 war on terrorism and the war in Iraq. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Daniel Abebe
  • Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys

    LAWS 79112 - 01 (3) m, s, x
    This seminar will teach the basic fundamentals of accounting to better prepare you to recognize and understand financial business issues related to the practice of law. Topics include key accounting concepts, reading financial statements and financial statement analysis. The class sessions will include guest speakers presenting on current accounting hot topics such as Sarbanes Oxley, working with the SEC and forensic accounting (investigating accounting frauds). The class is designed for those who have never taken an accounting class and/or have little financial background. There are no prerequisites but you should not take this class if you have taken an accounting class before or if you have experience in finance or accounting. Grades will be based on papers and a final examination.
    Autumn 2013
    Philip Bach, Sean Young
  • Greek Tragedy and Philosophy

    LAWS 96303 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m
    Ancient Greek tragedy has been of continuous interest to philosophers, whether they love it or hate it. But they do not agree about what it is and does, or about what insights it offers. This seminar will study the tragic festivals and a select number of tragedies, also consulting some modern studies of ancient tragedy. Then we shall turn to philosophical accounts of the tragic genre, including Plato, Aristotle, the Greek and Roman Stoics, Seneca, Lessing, Schlegel, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Iris Murdoch, and Bernard Williams. If we have time we will include some study of ancient Greek comedy and its philosophical significance. Admission by permission of the instructor. Permission must be sought in writing by September 15. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in philosophy or some equivalent solid philosophy preparation, OR a solid grounding in Classics, including language training. In other words, those who qualify on the basis of philosophical background do not have to know ancient Greek, but someone without such preparation may be admitted on the basis of knowledge of Greek and other Classics training of the sort typical of our Ph.D. students in Classics. An extra section will be held for those who can read some of the materials in Greek.
    Autumn 2013
    Martha Nussbaum
  • Greenberg Seminar: Cheating

    LAWS 95902 - 07 (1) a, x
    This seminar will explore legal, ethical, and procedural issues inherent in questions of cheating and rule breaking in contexts ranging from sports and academics to private career advancement. We will look at the nature of rules and difficult distinctions that must be drawn such as why some rules are expected to be broken while others are not. We will explore the line between artificial performance enhancement as cheating on the one hand and as positive personal improvement on the other. For example, we will look at the different treatment of performance enhancing drugs in athletics and in performance art. We will also explore how and when law and government should be involved in setting and enforcing rules.
    Autumn 2013