Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3)
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, and the relationships between federal and state courts. There are no prerequisites. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final in-class examination.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Mortara
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3)
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, and the relationships between federal and state courts. Constitutional Law I is a prerequisite, though it may be waived in special circumstances. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2016
    William Baude
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Autumn 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Winter 2016
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Spring 2016
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Practice

    LAWS 47502 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    Federal Criminal Practice aims to expand students’ knowledge of the scope and application of federal criminal law, and will challenge students to think and act as practicing prosecutors and defense attorneys. Because the class is taught by two senior associates at Winston & Strawn LLP who focus their practices on criminal law, including representation of individuals and companies in criminal matters and referrals to law enforcement agencies, the class seeks to prepare students to bridge the gap between law school and actual practice of federal criminal law. The class seeks to combine substantive content with practical considerations to help students start to think like a practitioner. The class includes lecture and discussion about significant topics in federal criminal law; guest speakers with prosecutorial, judicial, and private practice experience who will describe the application and implications of these topics; and practical exercises that will provide students with the opportunity to enhance their advocacy abilities both orally and in writing. The class will review four major areas of federal criminal law: (1) the role and scope of the federal criminal system; (2) federal narcotics prosecutions; (3) federal public corruption prosecutions including use of the mail fraud and honest services statutes; and (4) federal racketeering laws. Students will gain a working knowledge of relevant case law on these topics, and will also review and apply real cases prosecuted in federal courts in the Northern District of Illinois. Students will also hear from guest speakers on topics 2-4, who will also provide information about more general challenges and issues that they have observed or experienced in their own practices and will provide tips regarding the upcoming practical exercises, discussed below. To cover a spectrum of experiences, the speakers will be (1) a federal judge in the Northern District of Illinois who also served as an Assistant United States Attorney for many years; (2) a current Assistant United States Attorney who is early in his prosecutorial career; and (3) a former Assistant United States Attorney who now focuses his practice on criminal defense work at a law firm. This class is unique in that it will incorporate a practical component, namely: writing and arguing a motion to suppress evidence and a sentencing position; conducting an opening statement; and presenting a short closing argument. For all exercises students will be divided evenly between prosecutors and defense attorneys. Students will complete two written and three oral exercises which, together with class participation, will provide the basis for each student’s grade. Because of the practical component, the class size will be strictly limited to 12 students.
    Spring 2016
    Shannon T. Murphy, Jared Hasten
  • Federal Criminal Procedure: From Bail to Jail

    LAWS 47301 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course surveys the federal criminal process from the formal filing of charges in court through trial and beyond. While Criminal Procedure I examines the procedural rules that govern police investigations, this course examines the procedural rules that govern the criminal process after an arrest, as the case moves through the court process. (This course is not called “Criminal Procedure II” because Criminal Procedure I is not a prerequisite.) The law that governs after formal proceedings have commenced is based largely on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and on the Fifth and Sixth Amendments, but is less doctrinal and constitutional than the law that governs during the investigative stage of a case. Topics include: pretrial release and detention, the preliminary hearing, the grand jury, the charging instrument, joinder and severance, discovery, selected trial issues (including confrontation rights), plea bargaining and negotiation, and sentencing. We also examine prosecutorial discretion and ethical issues surrounding the representation of criminal defendants. Various guest speakers typically visit class, including federal district court judges, an Assistant United States Attorney, and a criminal defense lawyer. The final grade is based on an eight-hour take-home examination.
    Spring 2016
    Alison Siegler
  • Federal Habeas Corpus

    LAWS 58502 - 01 (2 to 3) +, l, m, x
    We will cover the history of the Great Writ and the evolution of the scope of federal habeas corpus review and relief; the Suspension Clause; habeas review in capital cases including stays of execution; alternatives to habeas review; state post-conviction proceedings; and jurisdictional issues in both the trial and appellate courts. There will be an emphasis on habeas review under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, which will be particularly helpful for students taking federal judicial clerkships. Students' grades are based on in-class examination and participation, and a short research paper (if the 3 credit option is chosen). Students who have completed Criminal Procedure III (LAWS 49701) may not register for this class.
    Autumn 2015
    Adam Mortara
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) +, x
    The securities laws govern the way in which a company may raise, and seek to raise, capital. They also impose substantial ongoing obligations upon companies and their security holders in both private and public companies. The course will cover rules relating to public and private offerings of securities by issuers, to sales and resales of securities, and to ongoing disclosure and reporting obligations of issuers and other securities markets participants. The course will also cover liability provisions under the Securities Act and the Securities Exchange Act, as well as private and public regimes for enforcing compliance with securities laws. Business Associations, Corporations or a similar survey course is a strongly recommended prerequisite for Securities Regulation. LL.M. students may register for the class if they have taken a class on corporate law while pursuing their first law degree. The casebook required for the class is James D. Cox, Robert W. Hillman and Donald C. Langevoort, Securities Regulation: Cases and Materials (7th edition, 2013). Grades will be based primarily on a final in-class examination but valuable class participation will be taken into account.
    Autumn 2015
    Urska Velikonja
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) x
    We will examine in detail the law regulating the issuance and sale of securities (that is, stocks, bonds, and other financial instruments) in the United States. Topics will include: initial public offerings (IPOs), the regulation of stock exchanges, private placements of stock, securities fraud litigation, and the regulation of broker-dealers.
    Winter 2016
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Federal Tax Policy Seminar

    LAWS 55801 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    This seminar will examine selected topics of current interest in federal tax policy. The exact mix of topics will depend (at least in part) on tax legislation under consideration by Congress. Students will be graded on a combination of class participation and four short reaction papers.
    Autumn 2015
    Julie Roin
  • Feminist Economics and Public Policy

    LAWS 70502 - 01 (2 to 3) c/l, m, x
    This seminar will explore advances in feminist economics and the implications for public policy in local and global communities. Drawing from feminist economics research, the seminar will address the persistence of gender inequality in societies around the world and proposed policy solutions. Topics will include gender relations and the organization of domestic and market work, violence against women, workplace and pay equality, gendered access to resources, education, and healthcare, and gender and property rights. Grades will be based on a series of short writing assignments and class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Diana Strassmann
  • Food and Drug Law and Policy

    LAWS 94501 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course explores legal and policy issues in the federal regulation of foods, drugs, medical devices, and other products coming within the jurisdiction of the FDA. It will examine substantive standards applicable to these products and procedural issues in the enforcement of these standards. It will also address the tension between state and federal regulation in this area, constitutional constraints on such regulation, and a variety of other issues relating to the development and marketing of regulated products. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or paper.
    Spring 2016
    Jack Bierig
  • Foreign Relations Law

    LAWS 97801 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of American foreign relations. Topics include the allocation of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements and the power to declare and conduct war. The course will also focus on the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases. Where relevant, current events will be explored, such as ongoing controversies regarding individual rights during wartime, the post-September 11 war on terrorism, the Iraq war, targeted killings, and drone strikes, among other topics. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Daniel Abebe
  • Freedom of Speech in the Digital Age

    LAWS 40202 - 01 (3) +, m, r, w, x
    New communication technologies raise new and difficult questions about the meaning of the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech. This seminar engages those questions. It examines what freedom of speech means in the digital age and how the government can and should protect it. Topics covered in the seminar will include: search code and the constitutional category of speech; revenge porn; copyright and the Digital Copyright Millennium Act; network neutrality; video games; the right to record; and the First Amendment problems raised by mass government surveillance. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their in-class participation, three short response papers, and a final essay. Constitutional Law II is a prerequisite for the seminar.
    Spring 2016
    Genevieve Lakier
  • From Caliphate to Nation State: A Survey of Modern Muslim Constitutional Thought

    LAWS 80232 - 01 (3) c/l, l, m, x
    This seminar will review the contemporary debates around the role of Islamic Law in modern political and legal systems. The primary objective of the seminar will be to give the student a basic understanding of Islamic legal theory and the challenges modern Muslim nation states face in addressing the role of Islamic Law. The seminar will focus on the constitutional law issues regarding sources of law, religious freedom, public interest, and related issues in Muslim majority countries as well as review the debates around the application of Islamic Law in Muslim minority states. Current political debates around Shari’ah law will be assessed against Islamic legal theory and constitutional law, specifically in light of the “Arab Spring” revolutions and the phenomena of violent extremism such as ISIS. As such, in addition to a theoretical understanding of Islamic Law in the modern context, students will also develop an understanding of the practical impact of legal theory on political, social, and economic realities in the Muslim world and beyond. This is a one-quarter seminar for 2L and 3L students. There are no pre-requisite courses required in Islam. Weekly readings will be assigned in English language source materials. The seminar will draw on the lecturer’s extensive personal experience with the subject matter and knowledge of the legal systems of Muslim majority states such as Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE, Pakistan, Egypt, Malaysia, and elsewhere. Professor Kamran Bajwa undertook a private study of Islamic Law and Theology at the Al Azhar seminary in Cairo, Egypt, prior to attending the University of Michigan Law School where he also took advanced courses in Islamic Law. He currently heads the Middle East regional practice for the law firm of Kirkland & Ellis and has served as an advisor to major Islamic scholars and political leaders throughout the Muslim world involved in legal reform and intellectual projects. He is fluent in Arabic and Punjabi. Grading will be based on a group presentation to the class on sub-topic of students' choice, a short 10-12 page research paper, and class participation and attendance.
    Autumn 2015
    Kamran S. Bajwa
  • Frontiers of Consumer Protection Law

    LAWS 57503 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, x
    What do student loans, television advertisements, and telemarketing all have in common? Consumer protection law. This large and critically important body of law impacts everyday life in ways that are often unappreciated. Congress, state legislatures, agencies, and consumers are actively involved today in shaping consumer protection in response to new technologies, financial instruments, and marketing strategies. In this seminar, students will learn the history and theory of consumer protection law and evaluate its effectiveness. They will be introduced to the law associated with product warranties, predatory lending, and debt collection practices. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and a series of reaction papers (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a short research paper (10-15 pages) in addition to the rest of the coursework.
    Spring 2016
    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi
  • Frontiers of Corporate Law

    LAWS 42306 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, r, w, x
    We will read cases, academic articles (from lawyers, economists, and business academics), and books on current issues in corporate law. The seminar will build on the foundational corporate law or business associations course, by examining issues at the cutting edge of corporate governance. Grades will be based on a series of short essays responding to the readings, or a full-lenth paper. Prerequisite: Corporations or Business Organizations.
    Autumn 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys

    LAWS 79112 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will teach the basic fundamentals of accounting to better prepare you to recognize and understand financial business issues related to the practice of law. Topics include key accounting concepts, reading financial statements and financial statement analysis. The class sessions will include guest speakers presenting on current accounting topics such as Sarbanes Oxley, working with the SEC and forensic accounting (investigating accounting frauds). The class is designed for those who have never taken an accounting class and/or have little financial background. There are no prerequisites but you should not take this class if you have taken an accounting class before or if you have experience in finance or accounting. Grades will be based on homework, papers, and a final examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Philip Bach, Sean Young
  • Greenberg Seminar: Crime and Politics in Charm City: A Portrait of the Urban Drug War

    LAWS 95902 - 01 (1) a, x
    We will explore a series of works on urban crime, politics, and policing, with an emphasis on the City of Baltimore: David Simon, “Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,” Sudhir Venkatesh, “Gang Leader for a Day,” Jill Loevy, “Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America,” and all of “The Wire.” We will focus particularly on the drug war – the economics and violence of the trade; the culture of the police bureaucracy; alternative law enforcement strategies such as informants and wiretapping; the politics of race, crime rates, and legalization; and the effects of addiction. But these works also examine the effects of declining blue collar jobs and weakening labor unions; the effects of race, incumbency, and corruption on local politics; the challenges and failures of urban education and child welfare agencies; and the role of the city newspaper in self-governance. Preference is given to 3L students. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2015
    Richard H. McAdams, Jonathan Masur