Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Evolution, Neuroscience, and the Law

    LAWS 76603 - 01 (3) m, r, x
    This seminar critically examines the relationship between contemporary developments in evolutionary psychology, evolutionary game theory, neuroscience, genomics and the law. Although the legal academy has embraced many social scientific methodologies, it is still in the early stages of wrestling with how contemporary developments in the biological sciences bear on the law. Over the past several decades, a number of empirical and technological advances have, however, generated a veritable renaissance in the biological, evolutionary and neurobiological sciences. This renaissance creates new potential for cross-fertilization but also many dangers of misinterpretation, some of which the legal academy is poorly suited to address. To help bridge this gap, this seminar introduces students to several of the key developments that have generated this renaissance. Topics of discussion will include the evolution and neuropsychological underpinnings of cooperation, law, and the psychological attitudes that animate legal systems. Students will critically discuss the relationship between recent findings and other work in the study of human decision-making. Other topics for critical discussion will include the bearing that recent developments have on questions of freedom of the will, responsibility, the function of criminal punishment, race and the persistence of racial inequality.
    Spring 2016
    Robin Bradley Kar
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Autumn 2015
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Winter 2016
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Spring 2016
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Fair Housing

    LAWS 97312 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar will focus on the law and policy of fair housing, broadly construed. Significant attention will be devoted to antidiscrimination laws in housing, including the federal Fair Housing Act. We will also explore existing and proposed policies for improving access of lower-income people to housing. The dynamics of segregation and concentrated poverty will be examined, as well as the effects of zoning and other land use controls. Additional topics may include urban squatting, rent control, gentrification, subprime lending, the siting of locally undesirable land uses, and the use of eminent domain in  blighted areas. The student's grade will be based on class participation and a research paper.
    Spring 2016
    Lee Fennell
  • Family Law

    LAWS 45001 - 01 (3) c/l, r
    This course will examine the state's role in recognizing and regulating personal relationships between adults and between adults and children. Throughout the quarter we will explore assumptions about family that underlie existing legal regulation, including assumptions embodied in constitutional law. The grade is based on a substantial paper, series of short papers, or final examination, with class participation taken into account. Paper writers require permission of the instructor; ADDITIONAL explicit instructor consent required for paper to be considered for SRP certification. Can be taken with Constitutional Law VII (LAWS 47101) with permission of the instructor. Undergraduates by instructor permission only.
    Spring 2016
    Mary Anne Case
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) x
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, and the relationships between federal and state courts. There are no prerequisites. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Mortara
  • Federal Courts

    LAWS 41101 - 01 (3) x
    This course covers the role of the federal courts in the federal system. Topics will include the jurisdiction of the federal courts, Congress's power over those courts, litigation against federal and state governments and their officials, and the relationships between federal and state courts. Constitutional Law I is a prerequisite, though it may be waived in special circumstances. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Spring 2016
    William Baude
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Autumn 2015
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Winter 2016
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Justice Clinic

    LAWS 67513 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The Federal Criminal Justice Clinic zealously represents indigent defendants charged with federal crimes and gives students a unique opportunity to practice in federal court. The FCJC is the only legal clinic in the country that exclusively represents indigent clients charged with federal felonies. We enter our federal district court cases at the time of arrest, take them to trial or guilty plea and sentencing, and then carry them through appeal and beyond. As part of our broader mission to promote fairness in the criminal justice system, we also take Seventh Circuit appeals and write amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court. FCJC students interview clients and witnesses; meet with clients at the federal jail; conduct and participate in bond hearings, preliminary hearings, arraignments, evidentiary hearings, plea hearings, sentencing hearings, and trials; research, write, and argue motions and briefs; negotiate with prosecutors; and participate in case investigations. Students involved in appellate litigation research and write briefs to the Seventh Circuit and the Supreme Court and conduct oral argument in the Seventh Circuit. The seminar component includes skills exercises, simulations, lectures, case rounds, and discussions. The pre-requisites/co-requisites are Evidence and Criminal Procedure I; these courses may be taken at any time during 2L or 3L year. It is strongly recommended that students interested in joining the FCJC as 3Ls take Prof. Siegler's Federal Criminal Procedure course during 2L year (if offered) and take the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop at the beginning of 3L year. The FCJC is a year-long clinic and is typically only open to 3Ls. Any slots that remain after bidding closes will be opened to 2Ls.
    Spring 2016
    Erica Zunkel, Alison Siegler, Judith P. Miller
  • Federal Criminal Law

    LAWS 46501 - 01 (3) x
    This course surveys the substance and structure of federal criminal law. The appropriate scope of federal criminal law and enforcement is a central theme of the course. Topics examined include: federal jurisdiction over crime and offenses that enlarge the reach of federal criminal law such as mail fraud; federal crimes occurring in markets, including transactions in illegal markets (such as drug trafficking) and illicit transactions in legal markets (such as securities fraud); federal crimes involving corrupt payments, such as bribery, extortion, and foreign corrupt practices; federal crimes involving concealment, such as false statements, perjury, obstruction of justice, and money laundering; the regulation of criminal activity occurring in and through formal and informal organizations (such as RICO), and the allocation of liability between individuals and organizations with particular attention to deferred prosecution agreements.
    Winter 2016
    Thomas J. Miles
  • Federal Criminal Practice

    LAWS 47502 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    Federal Criminal Practice aims to expand students knowledge of the scope and application of federal criminal law, and will challenge students to think and act as practicing prosecutors and defense attorneys. Because the class is taught by two senior associates at Winston & Strawn LLP who focus their practices on criminal law, including representation of individuals and companies in criminal matters and referrals to law enforcement agencies, the class seeks to prepare students to bridge the gap between law school and actual practice of federal criminal law. The class seeks to combine substantive content with practical considerations to help students start to think like a practitioner. The class includes lecture and discussion about significant topics in federal criminal law; guest speakers with prosecutorial, judicial, and private practice experience who will describe the application and implications of these topics; and practical exercises that will provide students with the opportunity to enhance their advocacy abilities both orally and in writing. The class will review four major areas of federal criminal law: (1) the role and scope of the federal criminal system; (2) federal narcotics prosecutions; (3) federal public corruption prosecutions including use of the mail fraud and honest services statutes; and (4) federal racketeering laws. Students will gain a working knowledge of relevant case law on these topics, and will also review and apply real cases prosecuted in federal courts in the Northern District of Illinois. Students will also hear from guest speakers on topics 2-4, who will also provide information about more general challenges and issues that they have observed or experienced in their own practices and will provide tips regarding the upcoming practical exercises, discussed below. To cover a spectrum of experiences, the speakers will be (1) a federal judge in the Northern District of Illinois who also served as an Assistant United States Attorney for many years; (2) a current Assistant United States Attorney who is early in his prosecutorial career; and (3) a former Assistant United States Attorney who now focuses his practice on criminal defense work at a law firm. This class is unique in that it will incorporate a practical component, namely: writing and arguing a motion to suppress evidence and a sentencing position; conducting an opening statement; and presenting a short closing argument. For all exercises students will be divided evenly between prosecutors and defense attorneys Students will complete two written and three oral exercises which, together with class participation, will provide the basis for each student s grade. Because of the practical component, the class size will be strictly limited to 12 students.
    Spring 2016
    Shannon T. Murphy, Jared Hasten
  • Federal Criminal Procedure: From Bail to Jail

    LAWS 47301 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course surveys the federal criminal process from the formal filing of charges in court through trial and beyond. While Criminal Procedure I examines the procedural rules that govern police investigations, this course examines the procedural rules that govern the criminal process after an arrest, as the case moves through the court process. (This course is not called  Criminal Procedure II because Criminal Procedure I is not a prerequisite.) The law that governs after formal proceedings have commenced is based largely on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and on the Fifth and Sixth Amendments, but is less doctrinal and constitutional than the law that governs during the investigative stage of a case. Topics include: pretrial release and detention, the preliminary hearing, the grand jury, the charging instrument, joinder and severance, discovery, selected trial issues (including confrontation rights), plea bargaining and negotiation, and sentencing. We also examine prosecutorial discretion and ethical issues surrounding the representation of criminal defendants. Various guest speakers typically visit class, including federal district court judges, an Assistant United States Attorney, and a criminal defense lawyer. The final grade is based on an eight-hour take-home examination.
    Spring 2016
    Alison Siegler
  • Federal Habeas Corpus

    LAWS 58502 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, x
    We will cover the history of the Great Writ and the evolution of the scope of federal habeas corpus review and relief; the Suspension Clause; habeas review in capital cases including stays of execution; alternatives to habeas review; state post-conviction proceedings; and jurisdictional issues in both the trial and appellate courts. There will be an emphasis on habeas review under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, which will be particularly helpful for students taking federal judicial clerkships. Students' grades are based on in-class examination and participation, and a short research paper (if the 3 credit option is chosen). Students who have completed Criminal Procedure III (LAWS 49701) may not register for this class.
    Autumn 2015
    Adam Mortara
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) +, x
    The securities laws govern the way in which a company may raise, and seek to raise, capital. They also impose substantial ongoing obligations upon companies and their security holders in both private and public companies. The course will cover rules relating to public and private offerings of securities by issuers, to sales and resales of securities, and to ongoing disclosure and reporting obligations of issuers and other securities markets participants. The course will also cover liability provisions under the Securities Act and the Securities Exchange Act, as well as private and public regimes for enforcing compliance with securities laws. Business Associations, Corporations or a similar survey course is a strongly recommended prerequisite for Securities Regulation. LL.M. students may register for the class if they have taken a class on corporate law while pursuing their first law degree. The casebook required for the class is James D. Cox, Robert W. Hillman and Donald C. Langevoort, Securities Regulation: Cases and Materials (7th edition, 2013). Grades will be based primarily on a final in-class examination but valuable class participation will be taken into account.
    Autumn 2015
    Urska Velikonja
  • Federal Regulation of Securities

    LAWS 42401 - 01 (3) x
    We will examine in detail the law regulating the issuance and sale of securities (that is, stocks, bonds, and other financial instruments) in the United States. Topics will include: initial public offerings (IPOs), the regulation of stock exchanges, private placements of stock, securities fraud litigation, and the regulation of broker-dealers.
    Winter 2016
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Federal Tax Policy Seminar

    LAWS 55801 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will examine selected topics of current interest in federal tax policy. The exact mix of topics will depend (at least in part) on tax legislation under consideration by Congress. Students will be graded on a combination of class participation and four short reaction papers.
    Autumn 2015
    Julie Roin
  • Feminist Economics and Public Policy

    LAWS 70502 - 01 (2 to 3) c/l, m, x
    This seminar will explore advances in feminist economics and the implications for public policy in local and global communities. Drawing from feminist economics research, the seminar will address the persistence of gender inequality in societies around the world and proposed policy solutions. Topics will include gender relations and the organization of domestic and market work, violence against women, workplace and pay equality, gendered access to resources, education, and healthcare, and gender and property rights. Grades will be based on a series of short writing assignments and class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Diana Strassmann
  • Food and Drug Law and Policy

    LAWS 94501 - 02 (3) c/l, w
    This course explores legal and policy issues in the federal regulation of foods, drugs, medical devices, and other products coming within the jurisdiction of the FDA. It will examine substantive standards applicable to these products and procedural issues in the enforcement of these standards. It will also address the tension between state and federal regulation in this area, constitutional constraints on such regulation, and a variety of other issues relating to the development and marketing of regulated products. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination or paper.
    Spring 2016
    Jack Bierig