Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Elements of the Law

    LAWS 30101 - 02 (3) 1L
    This course examines the role of judges in our legal system, focusing particularly on the processes of statutory and constitutional interpretation. The subjects for discussion include the nature of, and justification for, reasoning from precedent; the meaning of originalism and other methods of interpretation; and the role of history and context in judicial decision making. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Elements of the Law

    LAWS 30101 - 03 (3) 1L
    This course examines certain issues that occur in many different areas of the law and considers the relationship between these issues and related questions in other fields of thought, such as moral and political philosophy, economics, and political theory. The subjects for discussion include the nature of, and justification for, reasoning from precedent; the meaning of such notions as consent, coercion, and voluntary choice; the decision whether to impose rules or allow discretion; the problems of interpreting statutes and other authoritative texts; and the objective or subjective nature of moral judgments. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2014
    David A. Strauss
  • Employee Benefits Law

    LAWS 55503 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar will provide an introduction to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and other federal statutes regulating employee benefit plans in the private sector. The seminar will cover many types of plans, including defined benefit pension plans, individual account retirement plans (such as 401(k) plans), medical plans, other welfare benefit plans and executive compensation programs. It will provide a basic understanding of fiduciary standards governing plan administration and the investment of plan assets; minimum standards for benefits and funding; benefit claim dispute resolution procedures and standards of judicial review; federal preemption of state laws; and key issues which arise in ERISA litigation. The seminar is intended for students interested in a broader labor and employment practice; a mergers and acquisitions or general corporate practice; or a civil litigation practice. Although our primary mission will be to prepare students for the practice of law, we also will explore whether the law governing employee benefit plans is operating effectively and in accordance with its stated purposes. Students will be graded on class participation and on a series of short reaction and research papers. There are no prerequisites required for this seminar.
    Autumn 2014
    Charles Wolf
  • Employment Discrimination Law

    LAWS 43401 - 01 (2 to 3) w, x
    This course deals with the problem of discrimination in the American workplace and the federal and state statutes that have been enacted to prohibit it. Primary focus will be on the major federal equal employment opportunity statutes (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act), the types of claims that are brought under these laws (disparate treatment, disparate impact, mixed motives, and retaliation claims), and the varying burdens of proof/persuasion, procedural prerequisites, and remedies provided by these statutes, along with current proposals for legislative change. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students. The student's grade will be based on class participation and a final examination; students wishing to earn 3 credits for the class may write a 10-12+ page research paper in addition to the final exam.
    Winter 2015
    James Whitehead
  • Employment Law

    LAWS 43511 - 01 (2 to 3) w, x
    This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the common law principles and leading federal and state statutes that govern the private-sector employment relationship. Among the topics to be covered are (1) the contractual nature of the employment relationship and the employment-at-will doctrine; (2) contractual, tort-based, and statutory erosions of the employment-at-will doctrine; (3) the contractual and common law duties and obligations owed by an employee to the employer; (4) wage and hour, child-labor, and employee leave statutes, including the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA); and (5) other employee protective statutes. This course supplements, but will not cover the topics presented in, the Law School’s courses in Labor Law (LAWS 43101), Employment Discrimination Law (LAWS 43401), and Employee Benefits Law (LAWS 55503), which are not prerequisites to enrollment. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students. The student’s grade will be based on a final examination. Students wishing to earn 3 credits for the class may write a 10-12+ page research paper in addition to the final exam.
    Spring 2015
    James Whitehead
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Autumn 2014
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Winter 2015
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Employment Law Clinic

    LAWS 67113 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s, w
    Randall D. Schmidt and his students operate the Clinic's Employment Law Clinic. The Clinic focuses primarily on pre-trial litigation and handles a number of individual cases and class actions. In individual cases, the Clinic represents clients in cases before the Illinois Department of Human Rights and the Illinois Human Rights Commission and seeks to obtain relief for clients from race, sex, national origin, and handicap discrimination in the work place. In the class actions, the Clinic represents groups of employees in employment and civil rights actions in federal court. Additionally, in its individual cases and law reform/impact cases, the Clinic seeks to improve the procedures and remedies available to victims of employment discrimination so that employees have a fair opportunity to present their claims in a reasonably expeditious way. To accomplish this goal, the Clinic is active in the legislative arena and participates with other civil rights groups in efforts to amend and improve state and federal laws. It is suggested, but not required, that all students in the Employment Law Clinic take the Employment Discrimination Law seminar. It is recommended that third-year students take, prior to their third year, either the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or some other trial practice course. The student's grade is based on class participation. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty. Evidence is a prerequisite for 3L's in the clinic. The Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (or an equivalent trial practice course) is recommended for 3L's in the clinic.
    Spring 2015
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Energy Law Seminar

    LAWS 45302 - 01 (3) m, x
    The Energy Law Seminar exposes students to current issues facing energy industry practitioners. Topics covered during the first half of the seminar include United States shale developments, international energy projects, the natural resources curse, energy finance challenges, and energy litigation/arbitration trends. The second half of the seminar consists of a West Africa simulation, in which student teams bid on real petroleum licenses in West Africa, engage in a multilateral negotiation with other teams to acquire and divest license interests, and then drill wells by rolling dice to determine which of the 50 petroleum prospects are discoveries. The grade is based on in-class participation (including presentations and simulation performance), negotiation sessions between class meetings, and a series of written memoranda.
    Spring 2015
    Scott Gaille
  • Entrepreneurship and the Law

    LAWS 61902 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar examines how the law and legal counsel influence innovation and entrepreneurship in the US, particularly by micro-enterprises. The seminar explores the position of the entrepreneur in society, in the economy, and in our constitutional framework, in order to analyze the entrepreneur's fundamental legal needs. We then survey legal questions particular to start-ups, including strategies for structuring a business organization, financing, and protecting intellectual property. Assignments require students to research issues that apply to hypothetical and real start-ups and practice lawyerly skills like strategic planning, negotiation, drafting, and counseling. This seminar is required for participation in the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, unless students make other arrangements with the Clinic instructors. Students' grades will be based on active participation and several research and writing assignments.
    Autumn 2014
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Environmental Law

    LAWS 46001 - 01 (3)
    This course introduces students to the laws, policies and theories related to environmental protection in the United States. No environmental, engineering or science background is required, and it is not necessary to take Administrative Law before or during enrollment in this course. The course begins by reviewing different, and often competing, objectives related to the environment: development and use of natural resources, preservation of nature, protection of human health, economic efficiency, and distributional equity. The course then explores in depth how the common law and the major federal environmental statues (e.g. the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, etc.) address these objectives. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Winter 2015
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Ethical Quandaries in Legal Practice

    LAWS 41017 - 01 (3) m, p, x
    Given 24-hour news cycles, macro-economic pressures facing many law firms, government entities and corporations, and the proliferation of social media, the practice of law is under increasingly intense scrutiny from clients, the public, the judiciary, governments, regulators and peers. The attendant risk to the reputations of practicing attorneys is much higher than it has ever been. This seminar will satisfy the professional responsibility/ethics graduation requirement. Through analysis of ethical issues that attorneys face on a daily basis, we will study the challenges, pitfalls, consequences and opportunities associated with the ethical practice of law. Additionally, we will examine the tension caused by attorneys' competing interests in: exercising independent judgment, serving as officers of the court, providing zealous advocacy and earning a living. Seasoned attorneys in private practice, in-house counsel and the judiciary will join portions of the seminar to discuss real world scenarios and provide insight into how attorneys can successfully navigate through today's ethical minefields. The grade assessment is: 40% class participation, 30% based on 3 reaction papers, and 30% on a take-home final exam.
    Winter 2015
    Joseph Alesia, Sharon Fairley
  • EU Competition Law: With Special Emphasis on the Application of Advanced Topics in Antitrust

    LAWS 75402 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    The seminar provides an introduction to interesting and cutting edge topics in antitrust economics using European competition law as the backdrop for applying and discussing this. European competition law and its application by the European Commission have evolved rapidly since around 2000. The seminar focuses on this modern period and the evolving use of economics in the Commission decisions and court judgments. It does not provide an introduction to black-letter EU competition law or a discussion of pre-2000 cases. Topics covered in recent years include the design of antitrust regimes, ordo-liberalism, two-sided markets, screening methods for cartels, dynamic competition, and behavioral economics. Cases covered in recent years have included the Commission’s decisions against MasterCard under Article 101 and Microsoft under Article 102. Grade will be based on a final in-class examination and an optional paper (to receive 3 credits).
    Spring 2015
    David Evans
  • European Legal History

    LAWS 91901 - 01 (2 to 3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar aims to give students an appreciation of the basic themes and most important events in European (as opposed to English) legal history. It begins with the Roman law formulated under the Emperor Justinian and moves forward to the 19th century. Among the subjects covered are Germanic law, the rise of legal science beginning in the 12th century, the nature of the ius commune, legal humanism, the reception of Roman law, the natural law school, and the movement towards Codification. In addition to the text book, students are expected to read one law review article each week and to share it with the class. They are permitted to write a research paper, but a final examination will also be offered as an option.
    Winter 2015
    R. H. Helmholz
  • Evidence

    LAWS 41601 - 01 (3) x
    This course examines the law governing proof of disputed propositions of fact in criminal and civil trials, including relevance, character evidence, the hearsay "rule" and other rules of exclusion, and examination and privileges of witnesses. The student's grade is based on a proctored exam.
    Winter 2015
    Emily Buss
  • Evidence

    LAWS 41601 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course examines the law governing proof of disputed propositions of fact in criminal and civil trials, including relevance, character evidence, the hearsay "rule" and other rules of exclusion, and examination and privileges of witnesses. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Evolving Regulation of Financial Institutions and Markets

    LAWS 94812 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    In this seminar we will consider the recent financial crisis that led to the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010. The Act mandates broad changes to the regulation of financial institutions in the U.S. and requires numerous regulatory agencies to promulgate hundreds of new regulations. The seminar will concentrate on certain areas addressed by the Act and the ensuing rule-making process, which is still underway—paying particular attention to the causes of the crisis and its impact on the financial system. Our goal will be to critically assess whether these measures are likely to promote the stated objectives of the legislators, as well as the merits and feasibility of those objectives. For 2 credits, two short (10-12 pg.) papers; for 3 credits, one short and one long (approximately 20 pg.) papers. Each student also must make a class presentation on one of the paper topics.
    Autumn 2014
    Jim Foorman
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Autumn 2014
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Winter 2015
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens
  • Exoneration Project Clinic

    LAWS 67413 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The criminal justice system is not perfect. Innocent people are sometimes convicted of crimes they did not commit. When that occurs, the consequences for the lives of the wrongfully convicted and their families are truly devastating. By investigating and petitioning courts to reverse wrongful convictions, our Exoneration Project is dedicated to restoring justice. Our project represents innocent individuals who have been wrongly convicted. Students working in our project assist in every aspect of representation including selecting cases, investigating and developing evidence, as well as in-court litigation of post-conviction petitions, petitions for DNA testing, and federal habeas petitions. Students work closely with our clients and have an opportunity to develop their oral and written advocacy skills by preparing written pleadings and by appearing before trial courts and appellate court panels. Through participation in our project students will explore issues of error and inequality in the criminal justice system, including police and prosecutorial misconduct, the use of faulty scientific evidence, coerced confessions, unreliable eyewitness testimony, and ineffective assistance of counsel. The Exoneration Project is an intensive, rigorous experience designed for students who are committed to providing the best possible representation to deserving clients. Second-year students wishing to enroll in the Project are encouraged to take Evidence in their second year. Third-year students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Students are also strongly encouraged but not required to take Criminal Procedure I, and Criminal Procedure II. Students selected for this project will receive credit for the work they do in accordance with the credit rules for all other clinical programs.
    Spring 2015
    Russell Ainsworth, Tara Thompson, David Owens