Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Counterintelligence and Covert Action - Legal and Policy Issues

    LAWS 70706 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will focus on the constitutional and legal framework for counterintelligence and other instruments of national power that seek to neutralize and/or exploit our adversaries' intelligence activities against US national security interests. Such adversaries may include foreign intelligence services, terrorists, foreign criminal enterprises, cyber intruders, or some combination thereof. The seminar will consider both legal and policy issues raised in efforts to prevent adversarial espionage action -- overt, covert, or clandestine -- targeting US military, diplomatic, and economic interests at home and abroad. The seminar will also explore the role and overlap of covert action, roughly defined as action intended to influence events in another nation or territory without revealing the involvement of the sponsor. Although the primary focus of the seminar will be separation of powers issues and the role of executive power in counterintelligence and covert action, care will be taken to consider less frequently discussed implications for domestic and international economies and markets, as well as the extent to which economic and market considerations motivate policy making or legal decisions. The seminar will include short case studies from the Cold War and post-Cold War eras in the US, Latin America, the Middle East, and the former USSR. The seminar is designed to minimize overlap with the material covered in The Law of Counterterrorism (LAWS 70704) and National Security Issues (LAWS 70703) by primarily focusing attention on state actors rather than nonstate actors. Grades will be based upon a final paper, occasional short response papers, and reasonable class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Stephen Cowen
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Autumn 2015
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Winter 2016
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic

    LAWS 67213 - 01 (1 to 2 to 3) +, a, s
    The Project provides law and social work students the supervised opportunity to represent children and young adults accused of crime in juvenile and adult criminal court. Representation includes addressing the social, psychological and educational needs of our clients and their families. In addition to direct representation, students are involved in policy reform and public education including work with coalitions on issues of juvenile life without parole, youth violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of conviction.
    Spring 2016
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Criminal Law

    LAWS 30311 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination at the end of the Spring quarter.
    Autumn 2015
    Jonathan Masur
  • Criminal Law

    LAWS 30311 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination.
    Winter 2016
    Genevieve Lakier
  • Criminal Law

    LAWS 30311 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination at the end of the Spring quarter.
    Autumn 2015
    Sonja Starr
  • Criminal Law

    LAWS 30311 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, addresses the doctrines of criminal liability and the moral and social problems of crime. The definitions of crimes and defenses are considered in light of the purposes of punishment and the role of the criminal justice system, including police and correctional agencies. The student's grade is based on class participation and a single final examination.
    Winter 2016
    Thomas J. Miles
  • Criminal Procedure I: The Investigative Process

    LAWS 47201 - 01 (3) x
    This course focuses on the law regulating the investigatory process, including searches, seizures, and confessions. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Winter 2016
    John Rappaport
  • Criminal Procedure I: The Investigative Process

    LAWS 47201 - 01 (3) x
    This course focuses on the constitutional law of searches, seizures, self-incrimination, and confessions. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2016
    Richard H. McAdams
  • Critical Race Theory

    LAWS 69105 - 01 (3) +, r, w
    This class focuses on an intellectual and political movement called Critical Race Theory, a radical left position on race and law that emerged in law schools in the late 1980s. Critical Race Theory scholarship is unified by two major intellectual and political commitments. First, CRT scholars argue that liberal legal approaches to race, even and especially laws that demand racial neutrality, serve to reproduce white supremacy and racial inequality. For example, the civil rights laws of the 1960s narrowly focused on intentional discrimination and took off the table any legal remedy for structural processes like residential segregation, labor market segmentation and disparate public school financing. Second, CRT scholars argue that law should be used to advance a political commitment to racial empowerment and anti-subordination (for example, by broadly reading the equal protection clause to require a remedy for structural inequality). We will spend much of our time tracing the intellectual history of the movement by reading the key writings that formed the center of the movement. The course will explore the movement's central commitments, as well as its political split-offs, renegades, and disgruntled fellow travelers. In addition, we will explore the trenchant critique of identity politics developed by liberal and conservative scholars in the legal academy, and the debate over the movement's critique of merit. In the context of theoretical argument, specific topics to be covered will include: police brutality, affirmative action in education, hate speech and immigration reform. Students should have a basic understanding of equal protection in Constitutional Law. Con Law III is helpful in this regard. If you have not yet taken Con Law III, you should expect to read these cases on your own. Students will choose between writing a twenty-five page paper or three ten-page papers on topics of their choice. Students will also be asked to write short half-page reaction pieces to some portion of the course reading, to be submitted before class. Twenty-five percent of the course grade will come from class attendance and student participation in a vigorous and stimulating discussion. For a preview of the syllabus, see www.dariaroithmayr.com.
    Autumn 2015
    Daria Roithmayr
  • Cross-Border Transactions: Securities, M&A, and Joint Ventures

    LAWS 71408 - 01 (3) l, m, s, x
    This seminar is a survey of cross-border transactions and how successfully negotiating a transaction may vary across boarders. We will first examine U.S. M&A, securities and financing transactions to gain comparative oversight. After covering this foundational overview, we will turn to Europe to gain an understanding of how various governance rules and local laws can impact transactions and procedures. Next, we will devote some time to Asian markets to show how recent changes in local law have expanded the opportunities for cross-border transactions, particularly for capital markets transactions, and the implications of such changes on the legal profession. Subsequently, we will take a brief look at the growth of project finance in the Middle East. The seminar will also discuss the increasingly important issue of bribery, focusing primarily on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act. We will then put all this together to discuss multi-jurisdictional transactions and how to best negotiate cross-border legal, procedural and cultural differences. Students will work in teams throughout the quarter to mark up and negotiate various agreements.
    Autumn 2015
    Tarek Sultani
  • Current Controversies in Corporate and Securities Law

    LAWS 52202 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar deals with the most important developments in U.S. (and to some extent global) corporate and securities practice during the preceding year. The seminar and discussions provide analysis of the legal, political, and economic implications of these Developments. Each student submits one paper and gives an oral presentation and analysis of another student's paper.
    Winter 2016
    Richard Shepro
  • Current Issues in Criminal and National Security Law

    LAWS 70708 - 01 (3) +, l, m, w, x
    This seminar covers a series of current issues in criminal and national security law, often comparing and contrasting the two approaches, with a particular focus on challenges arising from acts of terrorism and other national security prosecutions (including a focus on substantive terrorism offenses, espionage offenses as well as the leaking of classified information), a discussion of criminal and intelligence investigative tools (comparing Title III electronic surveillance with Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act ), application of constitutional principles to terrorism investigations and prosecutions (particularly the First, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments and the application of Miranda, Quarles and Corley decisions and certain state bar rules in that context), the President's war powers and congressional oversight (including discussions of drone strikes, law of war detention, and Presidential and Congressional authority to use military force), and in other select areas, including the Classified Information Procedures Act, and economic sanctions, and national security leaks. Each class will focus on a different topic, with advance reading assigned around each topic, and grading on the basis of two short reflection papers (3-5 pages each) and a final paper preferably written in the form of a U.S. Supreme Court opinion (20-25 pages, including a majority and dissent) on a select issue in criminal and national security law. Guest speakers will help facilitate discussion on certain topics. Pre-requisites: Criminal Law and Constitutional Law I.
    Winter 2016
    Patrick Fitzgerald, Michael Scudder
  • Data Breach - Identification, Investigation, Notification, and Defense

    LAWS 68403 - 01 (2) l, m, x
    This seminar will examine how corporate actors are required to respond and notify around a data breach incident. Students will explore the substantive and procedural requirements that arise from state and federal data breach notification laws, and the requirements placed on corporations to notify impacted individuals when there has been a breach of triggering information, as both of those terms are defined under the laws. Topics include determining the laws applicable to a particular corporate entity (Gramm-Leach-Bliley, HIPAA, state laws, etc.), deciding if an incident constitutes a breach where notice is legally required, practical considerations for investigating a breach within various types of corporate entities, steps required for providing legally-compliant notification, exposure and legal risks after notification, and considerations for providing notification even if not legally required to do so. This practical and hand-on seminar will use a text written by the professor, a practitioner who regularly counsels companies who have suffered a data breach. The grade is based on in-class participation, an in-class presentation, and a series of short reaction papers.
    Autumn 2015
    Liisa Thomas
  • Developments in Fourth and Fifth Amendment Jurisprudence: Effects of Emerging Technologies

    LAWS 68303 - 01 (2) l, m, x
    This seminar focuses on the evolution of Fourth and Fifth Amendment jurisprudence in response to a world of rapidly changing technologies. Topics covered include changes in expectations of privacy effected by changes in technology, searching and monitoring of computers and email, use of geolocation information, GPS tracking, collection of historical and prospective cell-site location information and records and real-time cell phone tracking, searches of cell phones, and the act-of-production doctrine and compelled production of computer passwords. The seminar also considers related policy considerations and how these considerations are addressed by statutes, such as the Stored Communications Act, and by proposed legislation. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation.
    Winter 2016
    Michael Sher
  • Divorce Practice and Procedure

    LAWS 93202 - 01 (3) l, s, u, w, x
    This class provides an exposure to the dynamic process of representing clients in a dissolution of marriage case. The class will familiarize you with the complexities that arise when the ever changing family unit is divided and the parties are dissolving their marriage. Topics are covered in the sequence of an evolving case from the perspective of a practicing lawyer and include determination of jurisdiction, interstate and international parental kidnapping, domestic violence, injunctions, temporary and permanent child custody, visitation (parenting rights), temporary and permanent maintenance (alimony), child support, liability for attorneys fees, property rights and the division of assets and liabilities, valuation of assets, premarital and postmarital agreements, ethical issues, federal tax law affecting divorce and enforceability of divorce related orders if there is a subsequent bankruptcy. We will also discuss same-sex marriage, civil unions and issues relating to LGBT relationships. Students will have the opportunity to discuss topics and present arguments not only to instructors, but sitting Illinois Domestic Relations Court Judges, who will participate in several classroom discussions. Forty percent of a student s grade is based on class participation, and sixty percent on the legal memoranda to be prepared. Writing for this class may be used as partial fulfillment of the JD writing requirement (WP).
    Autumn 2015
    Donald Schiller, Erika N. Chen-Walsh
  • Drafting Contracts: The Problem of Ambiguity

    LAWS 79910 - 01 (2) l, m, s, x
    This seminar is unique. It is a very interesting, very intellectual, and very practical learning experience. The main features are: 1. Students will learn some extremely useful tools for analyzing and drafting contracts. They will acquire them by an inductive process of reviewing many examples of ambiguity from case law, eminent legal scholars, and the lecturer s practice. They will learn to identify and eliminate ambiguity in drafting contracts. These tools are the creation of the lecturer and will give students unique practical skills that no other American law students (except the lecturer s prior students) have. 2. The course materials come from the in-house seminars for the firm s China Practice lawyers that the lecturer conducted for many years as a partner at Baker & McKenzie and that established the profession s best practices for China-related contracts. 3. The historical examples of ambiguity in the seminar are of human, as well as intellectual, interest. They show that ambiguity can lead to the hanging of an individual for piracy or treason, a damages award of more than U.S. $10 billion, and even a change in the course of World War II. 4. The seminar facilitates student learning. At the beginning of each class, an audience response system (called  clickers ) provides students immediate, comparative, and anonymous feedback on their understanding of the reading assignment. The seminar also allows each student to see what he or she has learned in the seminar by comparing his or her analysis of a specific contract for the first class and for the last class. This contract analysis, like the final exam, gives each student the experience of a practicing lawyer reviewing a contract. Grades will be based on a proctored final exam.
    Winter 2016
    Preston Torbert
  • Economic Analysis of the Law

    LAWS 73201 - 01 (3) c/l, x
    This course introduces the concepts of law and economics. Over the last forty years, economics has become an important tool for those who want to understand the effect legal rules have on the way people behave. This course also explores the extent to which the principles of economics can be used to explain the workings of the legal system itself. The topics covered in this course include the Coase theorem, the choice between property and liability rules, the allocative effects of alternative liability rules (e.g., strict liability versus negligence); the determination of damages for breach of contract; and the economics of legal procedure. No prior acquaintance with economics or calculus is assumed; the relevant economic concepts are developed through an examination of particular legal applications. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Anup Malani
  • Election Law

    LAWS 95903 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law, both constitutional and statutory, that governs the American electoral system. Topics covered include the right to vote, reapportionment and redistricting, minority representation, the regulation of political parties, and campaign finance. The course draws heavily from both legal and political science scholarship. It addresses constitutional provisions including the First, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, as well as key statutes such as the Voting Rights Act, the Federal Election Campaign Act, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act. Students will develop an understanding of not only election law doctrine, but also the theoretical and functional underpinnings of the American electoral system.
    Autumn 2015
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos