Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Civil Procedure II

    LAWS 30221 - 02 (3) 1L
    Civil Procedure is offered in two parts. Part I meets in the Autumn Quarter and addresses the mechanics of civil litigation, with special reference to pleading, discovery, and trial, including the respective roles of judge and jury. Part II is offered in the Spring Quarter and focuses on the study of the power of particular courts to decide cases (subject matter jurisdiction); jurisdiction of the courts over the person or things before them; the scope and effect of judgments; principles of finality of judgments; and the rules governing joinder of claims and parties. The student's grade is based on an examination given at the end of each quarter.
    Spring 2015
    Anthony Casey
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Autumn 2014
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Winter 2015
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability

    LAWS 90913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project (PAP) is one of the nation’s leading law civil rights clinics focusing on issues of criminal justice. Through the lens of live-client work, students examine how and where litigation fits into broader efforts to improve police accountability and ultimately the criminal justice system. Students provide legal services to indigent victims of police abuse in federal and state courts. They litigate civil rights cases at each level of the court system from trial through appeals. Some students also represent children and adults in related juvenile or criminal defense matters. Students take primary responsibility for all aspects of the litigation, including client counseling, fact investigation, case strategy, witness interviews, legal research, pleadings and legal memoranda, discovery, depositions, motion practice, evidentiary hearings, trials, and appeals. A significant amount of legal writing is expected. Students work in teams on cases or projects, and meet with the instructor on at minimum a weekly basis. Students also take primary responsibility for the Clinic’s policy and public education work. PAP teaches students to apply and critically examine legal theory in the context of representation of people in need. It teaches students to analyze how and why individual cases of abuse occur and to connect them to systemic problems, often leading to “public impact” litigation and other strategies for policy reform. Through our immersion in live client work, we engage fundamental issues of race, class, and gender, and their intersection with legal institutions. We instruct students in legal ethics and advocacy skills. And we seek to instill in them a public service ethos, as they begin their legal careers. Students are required to complete, prior to their third year, Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, and the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Constitutional Law III is also recommended.
    Spring 2015
    Craig B. Futterman
  • Collective Bargaining in Sports and Entertainment

    LAWS 63903 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar examines collective bargaining in the contexts of professional sports and entertainment. The Sherman Act and Clayton Act are studied in light of antitrust exemptions that apply to monopolistic employment arrangements such as the reserve system (its opposite is called free agency), the draft and exclusive rights for a player, eligibility restrictions for star amateurs, and other anticompetitive practices in music, theater, movie, TV, and sports settings. The seminar explores how unions have evolved as potent employee responses to highly restrictive employment practices. Seminar readings examine powerful weapons under the National Labor Relations Act that unions may use to counteract employer cartels in theater, movies, baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and related industries. These weapons include full and partial and intermittent strikes, as well as strike threats. The seminar examines how these bargaining tactics enable rank-and-file employees, and star performers, to share in the wealth that they generate in combination with capital investments made by employers. The seminar emphasizes writing. Students are assigned weekly question sets, and are expected to submit a course paper based on the accumulation of these exercises.
    Autumn 2014
    Michael LeRoy
  • Commercial Law

    LAWS 42102 - 01 (3) x
    This course examines the basic principles of commercial law, including negotiable instruments, letters of credit, negotiable documents of title, and agency. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Winter 2015
    Douglas G. Baird
  • Commercial Transactions - Negotiation, Drafting, and Analysis

    LAWS 48604 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This simulation class provides intensive instruction in the negotiation, drafting, and analysis of complex commercial contracts. Students will develop the skills necessary to (i) translate a business deal into clear and concise contract terms, (ii) negotiate and draft various types of commercial contracts across multiple industries, and (iii) effectively and efficiently communicate complex commercial and contractual legal issues to clients. Grades will be based upon substantial weekly written exercises and productive class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Seth McNary
  • Comparative Constitutional Design

    LAWS 50102 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    Recent constitutional reconstructions in the Middle East have called new attention to the problems of institutional design of political and legal systems. In this seminar we will examine the design and implementation of national constitutions. In particular, we will address the following questions. What are the basic elements of constitutions? How do these elements differ across time, across region, and across regime type? What is the process by which states draft and implement constitutions? What models, theories, and writings have influenced the framers of constitutions? In this seminar, we will review the historical roots of constitutions and investigate their provisions and formal characteristics. We will also discuss the circumstances surrounding the drafting of several exemplary or noteworthy constitutions, from various regions of the world. We will then examine particular features of institutional design in depth, and analyze the factors that make constitutions effective and enduring. The grade is based on a series of short research papers and a final written paper.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Comparative Legal Institutions

    LAWS 50101 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course is designed to examine a range of legal institutions from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. It is not a traditional course in comparative law, in that it focuses not so much on particular rules of substantive law but on the structure of different legal systems and the consequences of those structural differences for law and society. In particular, we will focus on the economic impact of legal traditions. Readings will be drawn from legal and social science literature, including works from anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The course will explicitly cover non-Western legal traditions to an extent not found in conventional comparative law courses. Furthermore, American institutions are explicitly included in the comparison: this is not simply a course in foreign law. The grade is based on a final take-home examination. There is a paper option for upper-level students.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Complex Financial Institutions—the conundrum of "too big to fail?"

    LAWS 94813 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will examine how the financial crisis ignited the debate about whether global systemically important financial institutions are "too big to fail"; how current and proposed regulations in the US and EU have sought to address these issues; and what are the implications for the economy and capital formation from having different approaches. Class will be assessed by short papers in the form of blog postings, class participation, and a final research paper.
    Spring 2015
    Barry Zubrow
  • Complex Litigation

    LAWS 52412 - 01 (2) m, x
    An advanced civil procedure class, this seminar will introduce students to complex civil litigation, and the various ways available in the federal system to aggregate multi-party, multi-issue, and multi-forum disputes. The class will cover both the theory of the various laws and devices used in aggregation, and also the practical aspects of how those laws and theories succeed (or not) in achieving fair and efficient disposition of disputes. Topics covered will include the various mechanisms for aggregating parties, including joinder, intervention, interpleader, and class actions; relevant venue and consolidation considerations, including multi-district transfer and consolidation; federal jurisdiction and preclusion rules that affect aggregation; and relevant choice of law issues. Grading will be based on an open-book take-home final examination, with some account taken of class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Brian Murray
  • Computer Crime

    LAWS 68402 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the legal issues raised by computer crime. Topics will include: computer hacking and other computer crimes, the Fourth Amendment and civil liberties in cyberspace, the law of electronic surveillance, the freedom of speech online, technological tools used to combat cybercrime, and international cybercrime. No previous experience is required. Our primary source will be a casebook: Orin Kerr, Computer Crime Law (3rd ed. 2012), which will be supplemented with additional materials as listed in the syllabus. Students are required to participate in class sessions, prepare short response papers, and write a paper on an approved topic. Students may opt to write a major research paper for three credits that may meet the WP graduation requirement.
    Winter 2015
    William Ridgway
  • Conflict of Laws

    LAWS 41501 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course will examine the legal framework for the resolution of interstate conflict of laws within the U.S., focusing on the choice of law principles that courts apply to determine the rule of decision in cases where the relevant parties, conduct or transactions have connections to more than one state. The course will consider how conflict of laws rules implicate important separation of powers, federalism and private international law concerns. Topics include the federal constitutional limitations on choice of law, the extent to which courts must give full faith and credit to the judgments of courts in other states, and the role of international conflict of laws rules on the domestic enforcement of foreign judgments. The student's grade will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Daniel Abebe
  • Constitutional Law I: Governmental Structure

    LAWS 40101 - 01 (3) x
    This course provides an introduction to the U.S. Constitution. We will cover the traditional topics in separation of powers and federalism, including Congress's enumerated powers, the scope of executive power, judicial review, and so on. In the course of covering those substantive topics, we will sometimes explore the Constitution's meaning outside of judicial doctrine, asking how it should be interpreted by different people and institutions. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Autumn 2014
    William Baude
  • Constitutional Law I: Governmental Structure

    LAWS 40101 - 01 (3) x
    This course analyzes the structure of American government, as defined through the text of the Constitution and its interpretation. The major subjects covered are the allocation of powers among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; the function of judicial review; and the role of the states and the federal government in the federal structure. The student's grade is based on class participation and a take-home final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Justin Driver
  • Constitutional Law II: Freedom of Speech

    LAWS 40201 - 01 (3) +, x
    A study of the doctrine and theory of the constitutional law of freedom of speech. The subjects for discussion include advocacy of unlawful conduct, defamation, invasion of privacy, commercial speech, obscenity and pornography, offensive speech, symbolic expression, protest in public places, regulation of campaign finance, and selective government subsidies of speech. Students who have completed Constitutional Law IV are ineligible to enroll in this course. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    David A. Strauss
  • Constitutional Law II: Freedom of Speech

    LAWS 40201 - 01 (3) +, x
    This course explores the doctrine and theory of the constitutional law of freedom of speech. The subjects for discussion include advocacy of unlawful conduct, defamation, invasion of privacy, commercial speech, obscenity and pornography, offensive speech, symbolic expression, protest in public places, regulation of campaign finance, and selective government subsidies of speech. Students who have completed Constitutional Law IV are ineligible to enroll in this course. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Winter 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone
  • Constitutional Law III: Equal Protection and Substantive Due Process

    LAWS 40301 - 01 (3)
    This course considers the history, theory, and contemporary law of the post-Civil War Amendments to the Constitution, particularly the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. The central subjects are the constitutional law governing discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, and other characteristics, and the recognition of certain fundamental rights. Throughout, students consider certain foundational questions, including the role of courts in a democracy and the question of how the Constitution should be interpreted. The student's grade is based on a final take-home examination and class participation.
    Winter 2015
    Justin Driver
  • Constitutional Law III: Equal Protection and Substantive Due Process

    LAWS 40301 - 01 (3)
    This course considers the history, theory, and contemporary law of the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. The central subjects are the constitutional law governing discrimination on the basis of race, gender, and other characteristics, and the recognition of individual rights not explicitly enumerated in the Constitution. Throughout the course, students consider foundational questions about the role of courts in a democracy and how the Constitution should be interpreted. The grade is based on a final in-class examination and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Gerald Rosenberg
  • Constitutional Law IV: Speech and Religion

    LAWS 40401 - 01 (3) +
    In this course we will examine the Free Speech and Religion clauses of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. We will focus on historical and contemporary Supreme Court cases. We will also draw on major works of constitutional and political theory to help frame the issues. Topics of study include advocacy of revolution, hate speech, the public forum doctrine, state speech, religion-based exemptions to legal requirements, the role of religious symbols in public life, public vouchers for religious schools and state funding of religious organizations. We will also examine the ways that the Free Speech, Free Exercise and Establishment clauses relate to one another, including an inquiry into whether religious conscience is afforded “special” protection under the Constitution. Students who have completed Constitutional Law II or V are ineligible to enroll in this course. The grade is based on a final take-home examination and class participation.