Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • The Power to Tax

    LAWS 98705 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, x
    This seminar will explore the constitutional limitations on the power of federal, state, and local authorities to lay and collect taxes. Topics will include: the scope of Congress’s power under the Taxing and Spending Clause, the Export Taxation Clause, and the Sixteenth Amendment; federal constitutional restrictions on taxation by state and local governments (including the Import-Export Clause, the Equal Protection Clause, and the dormant commerce doctrine); and the constitutional distinction between a tax and a taking. The seminar will place particular emphasis on classic and recent Supreme Court cases addressing tax issues. There are no formal prerequisites, but Constitutional Law I and Introductory Income Taxation are recommended. Students may choose between a final take-home examination or a research paper.
    Spring 2016
    Daniel Hemel
  • The Rise of the Prosecutor

    LAWS 47603 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, x
    This seminar explores issues related to the rise of prosecutorial power in the American criminal justice system. We will begin by examining the historical origins of the public prosecutor. The bulk of the seminar will then be devoted to critically examining how the prosecutor has become the most influential actor in today’s criminal justice process and debating the normative consequences of that development. In so doing, we will discuss a variety of topics of contemporary significance, including the scope of prosecutorial power, past and current attempts to constrain prosecutorial power, and how prosecutorial power shapes the criminal justice system as a whole. Specific topics are likely to include the vast charging discretion afforded prosecutors (and the various ways in which they utilize that discretion), prosecutorial discretion to decline enforcement of certain laws, the prosecutor’s role in plea bargaining, and the potential impact elections have on prosecutorial power and behavior. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and a series of reaction papers (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a short research paper (10-15 pages) in addition to the rest of the coursework.
    Spring 2016
    Paul Crane
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professors Dennis Hutchinson and William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This seminar will meet: Friday, January 29: 9:00 a.m. to noon; 2:00-4:00 p.m. Saturday, January 30, 2015: 9:00 a.m. to noon; 2:00-4:00 p.m. Sunday, January 31: 9:00 a.m. to noon with an additional session in the Spring quarter for paper presentations.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding credits and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2016
    Tom Ginsburg
  • Topics in Law and Finance

    LAWS 80301 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    This is a seminar in law and finance, which will survey recent academic developments in corporate governance and financial regulation. Topics will include: (i) corporate governance models, (ii) board composition and board insulation, (iii) managerial incentives, (iv) incorporation and reincorporation decisions, (v) investor activism and investor opportunism, (vi) corporate governance in banks, (vii) bank regulatory capital, (viii) risk and incentives in banks, (ix) centralization and decentralization in banking regulation. The seminar will also offer a methodological part aimed at providing the necessary tools to interpret theoretical economic models and empirical legal work. Prerequisite: Business Organizations. The students’ grade will be based on class participation (30%) and reaction papers (70%).
    Spring 2016
    Simone Sepe
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
    Autumn 2015
    Saul Levmore
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is placed on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Winter 2016
    Lee Fennell
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Autumn 2015
    Daniel Hemel
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
    Winter 2016
    Saul Levmore
  • Trade Secrets

    LAWS 45902 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will examine the law that governs the protection of trade secrets and other confidential proprietary information. This body of law is typically given short shrift in intellectual property courses, notwithstanding the importance of trade secrecy protection in the information-based economy. The goal of this seminar is to provide trade secrecy with more sustained attention. Most of the reading for the seminar will consist of trade secret case law, to be supplemented by some interdisciplinary readings on trade secrecy protection. Students will be graded on the basis of short response papers due every other week (some of which will require outside research) and class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 45701 - 01 (3) x
    Course covering federal and state doctrines governing trademarks, domain names, and geographical indications; state law unfair competition doctrines; trademark dilution; publicity rights; and federal registration of trademarks. The student's grade is based on a final proctored examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Omri Ben-Shahar, William M. Landes
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) +, l, s, u, x
    Students will prepare and try a civil lawsuit to a jury. Lectures focus on advocacy skills needed to try a case: opening statements, direct and cross examinations and closing arguments. Students who have taken LAWS 67503 Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or LAWS 91702 Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy may not take LAWS 67603 Trial Advocacy.
    Winter 2016
    Thomas Dutton, Kevin Van Wart
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    This class will focus on the trial phases of civil litigation. Simulated trial problems designed to promote knowledge of the litigation process and to afford individual experience in selected phases of trial practice will be employed to familiarize students with pragmatic tactical issues and solutions. Written trial materials will be used and instruction will by lecture, demonstration, and exercise (including a mini-trial). Students who have taken the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (LAWS 67503) may not take Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603). An understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence is preferred but not a prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, and one or more written assignments. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.
    Spring 2016
    Jay Cohen
  • Trusts and Estates

    LAWS 45201 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law governing the transfer of property at death. Using the Uniform Probate Code, Uniform Trust Code, and other Uniform Acts, the course analyzes (i) intestate succession; (ii) wills (including execution, revocation, interpretation, and contests); (iii) will substitutes (i.e., nonprobate transfers) and planning for incapacity; and (iv) trusts (including creation, fiduciary administration, modification, termination, spendthrift and other asset protection trusts, and charitable trusts). The student’s grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2016
    Daniel Kelly
  • U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 50311 - 01 (3) l, m, s, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth look at the U.S. Supreme Court, with particular emphasis on the skills required to practice successfully in that forum. Students will not only discuss the Court as an institution, but they will also hone skills needed to navigate the certiorari process and to brief and argue before the Court. In addition to class participation, students will be graded on a legal brief (generally 15-25 pages in length) and on their performance in a moot court. The seminar is a prerequisite for participation in the Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic that the Law School plans to establish beginning with Winter Quarter, 2016, unless other arrangements are made with the clinic instructors.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Scodro