Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence.
    Winter 2016
    Saul Levmore
  • Trade Secrets

    LAWS 45902 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will examine the law that governs the protection of trade secrets and other confidential proprietary information. This body of law is typically given short shrift in intellectual property courses, notwithstanding the importance of trade secrecy protection in the information-based economy. The goal of this seminar is to provide trade secrecy with more sustained attention. Most of the reading for the seminar will consist of trade secret case law, to be supplemented by some interdisciplinary readings on trade secrecy protection. Students will be graded on the basis of short response papers due every other week (some of which will require outside research) and class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 45701 - 01 (3) x
    Course covering federal and state doctrines governing trademarks, domain names, and geographical indications; state law unfair competition doctrines; trademark dilution; publicity rights; and federal registration of trademarks. The student's grade is based on a final proctored examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Omri Ben-Shahar, William M. Landes
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) +, l, s, u, x
    Students will prepare and try a civil lawsuit to a jury. Lectures focus on advocacy skills needed to try a case: opening statements, direct and cross examinations and closing arguments. Students who have taken LAWS 67503 Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or LAWS 91702 Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy may not take LAWS 67603 Trial Advocacy.
    Winter 2016
    Thomas Dutton, Kevin Van Wart
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) l, s, u, x
    This class will focus on the trial phases of civil litigation. Simulated trial problems designed to promote knowledge of the litigation process and to afford individual experience in selected phases of trial practice will be employed to familiarize students with pragmatic tactical issues and solutions. Written trial materials will be used and instruction will by lecture, demonstration, and exercise (including a mini-trial). Students who have taken the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (LAWS 67503) may not take Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603). An understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence is preferred but not a prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, and one or more written assignments. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.
    Spring 2016
    Jay Cohen
  • Trusts and Estates

    LAWS 45201 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the law governing the transfer of property at death. Using the Uniform Probate Code, Uniform Trust Code, and other Uniform Acts, the course analyzes (i) intestate succession; (ii) wills (including execution, revocation, interpretation, and contests); (iii) will substitutes (i.e., nonprobate transfers) and planning for incapacity; and (iv) trusts (including creation, fiduciary administration, modification, termination, spendthrift and other asset protection trusts, and charitable trusts). The student’s grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2016
    Daniel Kelly
  • U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 50311 - 01 (3) +, l, m, s, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth look at the U.S. Supreme Court, with particular emphasis on the skills required to practice successfully in that forum. Students will not only discuss the Court as an institution, but they will also hone skills needed to navigate the certiorari process and to brief and argue before the Court. In addition to class participation, students will be graded on a legal brief (generally 15-25 pages in length) and on their performance in a moot court. The seminar is a prerequisite for participation in the Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic that the Law School plans to establish beginning with Winter Quarter, 2016, unless other arrangements are made with the clinic instructors.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Scodro
  • What Causes Crime?

    LAWS 42642 - 01 (2 to 3) m, x
    In this interdisciplinary seminar, students will read literature from allied fields including economics, criminology, sociology, psychology, and history in an attempt to understand what causes and reduces crime on both an individual and societal level. In addition to tackling this substantive question, we will discuss how the approaches of these academic disciplines differ and what each has to offer. The grade is based on class attendance and participation, including a series of short written submissions responding to the readings. Students may earn a third credit by writing a 15-page research paper in addition to the rest of the coursework.
    Winter 2016
    John Rappaport
  • Workshop: Business Law

    LAWS 63912 - 01 a, m, x
    This workshop will bring business law scholars to the Law School to discuss their latest works. The workshop will meet 2-3 times per quarter for 1.5 hours. Students taking the workshop for credit will write reaction papers for each paper.
    Autumn 2015
    M. Todd Henderson, Anthony Casey
  • Workshop: Business Law

    LAWS 63912 - 01 a, m
    This workshop will bring business law scholars to the Law School to discuss their latest works. The workshop will meet 2-3 times per quarter for 1.5 hours. Students taking the workshop for credit will write reaction papers for each paper.
    Winter 2016
    M. Todd Henderson, Anthony Casey
  • Workshop: Business Law

    LAWS 63912 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop will bring business law scholars to the Law School to discuss their latest works. The workshop will meet 2-3 times per quarter for 1.5 hours. Students taking the workshop for credit will write reaction papers for each paper.
    Spring 2016
    M. Todd Henderson, Anthony Casey
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2015
    Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2016
    Aziz Huq, Justin Driver
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (w-landes@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2015. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 a, m, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Autumn 2015
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Winter 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of working papers by guests, most of whom are renowned faculty from other institutions. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be occasional discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper; grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. There will be 13 meetings of the workshop (5, 4, 4, in the three quarters, respectively). Students will be required to submit 12 reaction papers. Each reaction paper is 2-3 pages long, for a total of 24-36 pages. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits; one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Spring 2016
    Omri Ben-Shahar