Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year on only in the fall quarter. It is open to all students, JSDs and LLMs are welcome. Both versions count as 1 seminar. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The fall quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The FALL ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP. May be taken concurrently with any other class or workshop. During Winter, the workshop is expected to meet the first four Weeks of the quarter; during Spring, the last four weeks of the quarter. The fall only version has short reaction papers that are not for the writing credit. The full year version is writing or revising a work to publishable form and if successfully completed fulfills the requirement. Grading is 60% written work, 40% participation.
    Winter 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (3) a, c/l, m, x
    This workshop may be taken for a full year on only in the fall quarter. It is open to all students, JSDs and LLMs are welcome. Both versions count as 1 seminar. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The fall quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The FALL ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP. May be taken concurrently with any other class or workshop. During Winter, the workshop is expected to meet the first four Weeks of the quarter; during Spring, the last four weeks of the quarter. The fall only version has short reaction papers that are not for the writing credit. The full year version is writing or revising a work to publishable form and if successfully completed fulfills the requirement. Grading is 60% written work, 40% participation.
    Autumn 2013
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Legal Scholarship

    LAWS 78711 - 01 (2) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop may be taken for a full year on only in the fall quarter. It is open to all students, JSDs and LLMs are welcome. Both versions count as 1 seminar. Students registered for the full year are required to either write a paper of publishable quality or revise a previously written paper for publication. The goal is to prepare students for the academic job market. Special attention is paid to topic selection, how to approach working on an original (not synthetic) project, and presentation skills. Students enrolled for the year will be expected to conduct themselves as they would if they were junior faculty members at a top law school, reading and commenting on the work of their peers. Optional lunches to discuss writing will be held throughout the year in the same format as the Faculty Round Table. The goal is to create a learning community that will provide students with the type of scholarly atmosphere the faculty here enjoys. There will be meetings on average every other week during Winter and Spring Quarters. The fall quarter only option is designed for several audiences: (1) students who want to decide if an academic career is for them; (2) students who wish to improve their skills as a public speaker; (3) students who want to improve their skills of critique while reading papers from a wide variety of subject areas; (4) and students who simply enjoy arguing about the law. Each week a young scholar present works-in progress and students play the role of the faculty in a faculty workshop. The class and the professor then provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter on aspects of both presentation style and the substance of the paper. The FALL ONLY version is graded on the basis of short reactions papers and class participation. The full year version may fulfill the WP or the SRP. May be taken concurrently with any other class or workshop. During Winter, the workshop is expected to meet the first four Weeks of the quarter; during Spring, the last four weeks of the quarter. The fall only version has short reaction papers that are not for the writing credit. The full year version is writing or revising a work to publishable form and if successfully completed fulfills the requirement. Grading is 60% written work, 40% participation.
    Spring 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory

    LAWS 63402 - 01 a, m
    Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
    Winter 2014
    R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Eduardo Peñalver, Jennifer Nou
  • Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory

    LAWS 63402 - 01 a, m
    Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
    Spring 2014
    R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Eduardo Peñalver, Jennifer Nou
  • Workshop: Public Law and Legal Theory

    LAWS 63402 - 01 (1) a, m, x
    Working from a variety of methodological orientations, the workshop examines questions arising at the intersections of public law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary work in law and the social sciences, with an emphasis on politics, legal history, and legal theory. Sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty members from other institutions. Students must enroll for the entire year and will receive one pass/fail credit. Students are required to read the papers, attend the workshop, ask questions, and to submit one reaction paper per quarter on a paper of their choosing.
    Autumn 2013
    R. H. Helmholz, Alison LaCroix, Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Eduardo Peñalver, Jennifer Nou
  • Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex, and Gender

    LAWS 63312 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w, x
    This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions, to be held irregularly throughout the Winter and Spring quarters, are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse. The grade is based on a substantial paper or series of short reaction papers, with class participation taken into account. Substantial paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of the instructor.
    Winter 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex, and Gender

    LAWS 63312 - 01 (1) a, c/l, m, r, w
    This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions, to be held irregularly throughout the Winter and Spring quarters, are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse. The grade is based on a substantial paper or series of short papers, with class participation taken into account. Substantial paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of the instructor.
    Spring 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Writing and Research in the US Legal System

    LAWS 79903 - 01 (3) m, x
    In this seminar, international LLM students learn research and writing skills essential to the practice of US law. Students learn how to use these skills to serve clients and sharpen their thinking. We discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English – no jargon, no legalese. The class functions largely as a workshop where we apply multiple research techniques and analyze the impact of various writing styles. Students meet individually with the instructors throughout the seminar. Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students must complete all assignments before the take-home examination, which determines the student’s grade. This seminar is open only to LLM students and satisfies the legal research and writing prerequisite for the New York Bar exam
    Autumn 2013
    Elizabeth Duquette, Margaret Schilt
  • Writing and Research in the US Legal System

    LAWS 79903 - 01 (3) m, x
    In this seminar, international LLM students learn research and writing skills essential to the practice of US law. Students learn how to use these skills to serve clients and sharpen their thinking. We discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English – no jargon, no legalese. The class functions largely as a workshop where we apply multiple research techniques and analyze the impact of various writing styles. Students meet individually with the instructors throughout the seminar. Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students must complete all assignments before the take-home examination, which determines the student’s grade. This seminar is open only to LLM students and satisfies the legal research and writing prerequisite for the New York Bar exam
    Winter 2014
    Elizabeth Duquette, Margaret Schilt
  • Young Center Immigrant Child Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 65013 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights Clinic combines international human rights, immigration law and children's rights law. Students in the Young Center clinic serve as Child Advocate (similar to a guardian ad litem) for unaccompanied immigrant children detained in Chicago detention facilities. Unaccompanied immigrant children come to the U.S. from all corners of the world, on their own. They are apprehended—typically at the U.S./Mexico border, or through internal enforcement—then detained and placed in deportation proceedings. Direct Client Service: Pursuant to federal law, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the Young Center is appointed as Child Advocate for the most vulnerable of these children (tender age children, children with mental or physical disabilities, children who have experienced extensive trauma, etc.). Law students in the Young Center Clinic are appointed by the federal government to serve as Child Advocate for individual children, and are responsible for advocating for the best interests of the assigned child on issues relating to care, custody, release, legal relief and safe repatriation. Each student meets weekly with the child at the detention facility, and advocates on behalf of the child with federal officials, including immigration judges and asylum officers, under the supervision of Young Center attorneys. Since there currently is no substantive best interests of the child standard under the Immigration and Nationality Act, students look to state child welfare law, international human rights law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and UNHCR Guidelines, and the child protection laws of the child’s home country. Policy Advocacy: In addition to serving as Child Advocate, clinic students have the opportunity to engage in legislative and policy advocacy aimed at improving the immigration system for immigrant children in removal proceedings. This is an especially exciting time because Congress is debating Comprehensive Immigration Reform. The Young Center will travel with students to Washington D.C. to meet with legislative officials in the Senate and the House to educate them about immigrant children and advance specific policies, including the appointment of counsel for immigrant children and incorporation of a substantive best interests of the child standard in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Young Center Clinic admits both second-year and third-year law students. Language skills are not required, but students who speak Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi or Urdu are strongly encouraged to apply. Students who enroll in the clinic must: 1. Participate in a 2-day orientation during the first week of Autumn Quarter (Saturday & Sunday); 2. Participate in a 2-hour weekly seminar during the Autumn Quarter; 3. Participate in bi-weekly brown bag lunch meetings during the Winter and Spring Quarters. For more information about the Young Center, visit: www.TheYoungCenter.org or contact Maria Woltjen at mwoltjen@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0349 or Elizabeth Frankel at efrankel@law.uchicago.edu or 773-702-9587.
    Autumn 2013
    Elizabeth Frankel, Maria Woltjen, Jajah Wu
  • Young Center Immigrant Child Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 65013 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights Clinic combines international human rights, immigration law and children's rights law. Students in the Young Center clinic serve as Child Advocate (similar to a guardian ad litem) for unaccompanied immigrant children detained in Chicago detention facilities. Unaccompanied immigrant children come to the U.S. from all corners of the world, on their own. They are apprehended—typically at the U.S./Mexico border, or through internal enforcement—then detained and placed in deportation proceedings. Direct Client Service: Pursuant to federal law, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the Young Center is appointed as Child Advocate for the most vulnerable of these children (tender age children, children with mental or physical disabilities, children who have experienced extensive trauma, etc.). Law students in the Young Center Clinic are appointed by the federal government to serve as Child Advocate for individual children, and are responsible for advocating for the best interests of the assigned child on issues relating to care, custody, release, legal relief and safe repatriation. Each student meets weekly with the child at the detention facility, and advocates on behalf of the child with federal officials, including immigration judges and asylum officers, under the supervision of Young Center attorneys. Since there currently is no substantive best interests of the child standard under the Immigration and Nationality Act, students look to state child welfare law, international human rights law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and UNHCR Guidelines, and the child protection laws of the child’s home country. Policy Advocacy: In addition to serving as Child Advocate, clinic students have the opportunity to engage in legislative and policy advocacy aimed at improving the immigration system for immigrant children in removal proceedings. This is an especially exciting time because Congress is debating Comprehensive Immigration Reform. The Young Center will travel with students to Washington D.C. to meet with legislative officials in the Senate and the House to educate them about immigrant children and advance specific policies, including the appointment of counsel for immigrant children and incorporation of a substantive best interests of the child standard in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Young Center Clinic admits both second-year and third-year law students. Language skills are not required, but students who speak Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi or Urdu are strongly encouraged to apply. Students who enroll in the clinic must: 1. Participate in a 2-day orientation during the first week of Autumn Quarter (Saturday & Sunday); 2. Participate in a 2-hour weekly seminar during the Autumn Quarter; 3. Participate in bi-weekly brown bag lunch meetings during the Winter and Spring Quarters. For more information about the Young Center, visit: www.TheYoungCenter.org or contact Maria Woltjen at mwoltjen@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0349 or Elizabeth Frankel at efrankel@law.uchicago.edu or 773-702-9587.
    Winter 2014
    Elizabeth Frankel, Maria Woltjen, Jajah Wu
  • Young Center Immigrant Child Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 65013 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights Clinic combines international human rights, immigration law and children's rights law. Students in the Young Center clinic serve as Child Advocate (similar to a guardian ad litem) for unaccompanied immigrant children detained in Chicago detention facilities. Unaccompanied immigrant children come to the U.S. from all corners of the world, on their own. They are apprehended—typically at the U.S./Mexico border, or through internal enforcement—then detained and placed in deportation proceedings. Direct Client Service: Pursuant to federal law, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the Young Center is appointed as Child Advocate for the most vulnerable of these children (tender age children, children with mental or physical disabilities, children who have experienced extensive trauma, etc.). Law students in the Young Center Clinic are appointed by the federal government to serve as Child Advocate for individual children, and are responsible for advocating for the best interests of the assigned child on issues relating to care, custody, release, legal relief and safe repatriation. Each student meets weekly with the child at the detention facility, and advocates on behalf of the child with federal officials, including immigration judges and asylum officers, under the supervision of Young Center attorneys. Since there currently is no substantive best interests of the child standard under the Immigration and Nationality Act, students look to state child welfare law, international human rights law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and UNHCR Guidelines, and the child protection laws of the child’s home country. Policy Advocacy: In addition to serving as Child Advocate, clinic students have the opportunity to engage in legislative and policy advocacy aimed at improving the immigration system for immigrant children in removal proceedings. This is an especially exciting time because Congress is debating Comprehensive Immigration Reform. The Young Center will travel with students to Washington D.C. to meet with legislative officials in the Senate and the House to educate them about immigrant children and advance specific policies, including the appointment of counsel for immigrant children and incorporation of a substantive best interests of the child standard in the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Young Center Clinic admits both second-year and third-year law students. Language skills are not required, but students who speak Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi or Urdu are strongly encouraged to apply. Students who enroll in the clinic must: 1. Participate in a 2-day orientation during the first week of Autumn Quarter (Saturday & Sunday); 2. Participate in a 2-hour weekly seminar during the Autumn Quarter; 3. Participate in bi-weekly brown bag lunch meetings during the Winter and Spring Quarters. For more information about the Young Center, visit: www. TheYoungCenter.org or contact Maria Woltjen at mwoltjen@uchicago.edu or 773-702-0349 or Elizabeth Frankel at efrankel@law.uchicago.edu or 773-702-9587.
    Spring 2014
    Elizabeth Frankel, Maria Woltjen, Jajah Wu