Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class will focus on the trial phases of civil litigation. Simulated trial problems designed to promote knowledge of the litigation process and to afford individual experience in selected phases of trial practice will be employed to familiarize students with pragmatic tactical issues and solutions. Written trial materials will be used and instruction will by lecture, demonstration, and exercise (including a mini-trial). Students who have taken the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop (LAWS 67503) may not take Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603). An understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence is preferred but not a prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, and one or more written assignments. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.
    Spring 2015
    Jay Cohen
  • U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 50311 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth look at the Supreme Court---its current docket and recent trends in its decisions, the modern debate over its proper role, and both written and oral advocacy before the Court. In addition to class participation, students are graded on a legal brief (generally 15-25 pages in length) and on their performance in a moot court.
    Autumn 2014
    Michael Scodro
  • Uncorporations

    LAWS 42305 - 01 (2) m, x
    Businesses today are more likely to be organized as limited partnerships, LLCs, trusts, or other alternatives to the standard corporation. In this seminar, we will examine these "uncorporate" entities in a range of contexts, ranging from law firms to investment funds to plain vanilla businesses. We will consider the theory of uncorporate entities, the major laws governing them, the differences between them and corporate entities, and the bubbling policy questions. Grades will be based on in-class presentations and a paper.
    Winter 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Utilitarian Ethics

    LAWS 51206 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m
    The British Utilitarians were social radicals who questioned conventional morality as a basis for both personal and public choice and proposed an alternative that they believed to be both more scientific and more morally adequate. In part because of the widespread acceptance of pieces of their views in economics and political science, the original subtlety and radical force of the views is often neglected. This seminar, focusing on John Stuart Mill and Henry Sidgwick, aims to examine sympathetically what classical Utilitarianism may still offer to philosophical ethics, and to see how the strongest criticisms of Utilitarianism measure up to the texts of its founders. Although it is hardly possible to study Utilitarianism as an ethical theory without attending to its political role, we shall focus for the most part on ethics, and on two works above all: Mill’s Utilitarianism and Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics, combining these with Mill’s The Subjection of Women, his Autobiography, and several key essays. Along the way we shall be investigating the views of Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick about animal suffering, women’s equality, and sexual orientation. Among the critics of Utilitarianism, we shall consider writings of Bernard Williams, John Rawls, Amartya Sen, Jon Elster, Elizabeth Anderson, and John Harsanyi. Admission by permission of the instructor. Permission must be sought in writing by September 15. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in philosophy or some equivalent solid philosophy preparation. This is a 500 level course. The grade is based on a final seminar paper of 20-25 pages, an oral seminar presentation, and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Martha Nussbaum
  • When is Political Power Legitimate?

    LAWS 98403 - 01 (2 to 3) c/l, m, w, x
    When political power is exercised, what makes it legitimate? Political theorists have long wondered how to justify political rule, which in general is any system whereby certain people get to make decisions on behalf of others and direct them to comply with the decisions, often ensuring their compliance through the threat or use of force. What justification can be provided for the normative standing of such systems of rule? The question of legitimacy is distinct from whether political rule is just or whether it is lawful (exercised according to a constitutional order), although those questions are not entirely separable. In this seminar, we will examine the possible grounds on which we might begin to establish why and how a particular political order is legitimate. We will begin with the paradigmatic case of the state, but we will also look at sub-national and international forms of political rule. We will examine and assess the prominent kinds of answers offered to this question: the common good / social welfare, individual freedom / natural rights, the social contract, and the democratic ideal of equality. Readings will include philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, as well as contemporary theorists such as Hannah Arendt, John Rawls, and Joseph Raz. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and their final option. Students have the option of taking a final exam or submitting a series of thought papers (for two credits), or submitting a set of short research papers or a major research paper (for three credits).
    Spring 2015
    Amanda Greene
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2014
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2015
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2015
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: International Law

    LAWS 63412 - 01 a, m, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
    Autumn 2014
    Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton
  • Workshop: International Law

    LAWS 63412 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
    Winter 2015
    Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton
  • Workshop: International Law

    LAWS 63412 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of current scholarship in international law. The workshop will meet four times per quarter for ninety minutes. Three of the workshop sessions each quarter will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by legal scholars and social scientists. The workshop will give students insight into cutting-edge research on why states form international agreements, and whether those agreements change state behavior. These sessions will occur roughly every other week. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive two credits.
    Spring 2015
    Daniel Abebe, Tom Ginsburg, Eric Posner, Adam Chilton
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2014. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2014. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2014. It will meet seven times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Autumn 2014
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Winter 2015
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Spring 2015
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Free Speech and Its Critics

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r, w
    The topic for 2014-15 will be "Free Speech and Its Critics." The Workshop will consider important philosophical defenses of free speech and critics of those rationales. Topics will include the idea of the "marketplace of ideas," autonomy interests in free speech, the harms of speech, and the problem of propaganda and other manipulative speech. Speakers during the year will include some or all of Susan Brison (Dartmouth), Frederick Schauer (Virginia), Robert Simpson (Monash), Seana Shiffrin (UCLA), Jason Stanley (Yale), and David Strauss (Chicago), among others. The instructors will meet with students for one hour a week before each speaker's arrival to discuss the paper (Monday, 4-5 pm). They will also meet with enrolled students for at least two two-hour sessions in Autumn to read and discuss at least Mill's On Liberty. Most of the visiting speakers will come in the Winter and Spring Quarters (roughly three per quarter). Attendance at all sessions of the Workshop is a requirement. JD students should contact bleiter@uchicago.edu with a resume and a brief statement of background and/or interest in the topic in order to secure permission to enroll. Philosophy PhD students may enroll without submitting these materials.
    Autumn 2014
    Martha Nussbaum, Brian Leiter
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Free Speech and Its Critics

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r, w
    The topic for 2014-15 will be "Free Speech and Its Critics." The Workshop will consider important philosophical defenses of free speech and critics of those rationales. Topics will include the idea of the "marketplace of ideas," autonomy interests in free speech, the harms of speech, and the problem of propaganda and other manipulative speech. Speakers during the year will include some or all of Susan Brison (Dartmouth), Frederick Schauer (Virginia), Robert Simpson (Monash), Seana Shiffrin (UCLA), Jason Stanley (Yale), and David Strauss (Chicago), among others. The instructors will meet with students for one hour a week before each speaker's arrival to discuss the paper (Monday, 4-5 pm). They will also meet with enrolled students for at least two two-hour sessions in Autumn to read and discuss at least Mill's On Liberty. Most of the visiting speakers will come in the Winter and Spring Quarters (roughly three per quarter). Attendance at all sessions of the Workshop is a requirement. JD students should contact bleiter@uchicago.edu with a resume and a brief statement of background and/or interest in the topic in order to secure permission to enroll. Philosophy PhD students may enroll without submitting these materials.
    Winter 2015
    Martha Nussbaum, Brian Leiter, Robert Simpson
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Free Speech and Its Critics

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r, w
    The topic for 2014-15 will be "Free Speech and Its Critics." The Workshop will consider important philosophical defenses of free speech and critics of those rationales. Topics will include the idea of the "marketplace of ideas," autonomy interests in free speech, the harms of speech, and the problem of propaganda and other manipulative speech. Speakers during the year will include some or all of Susan Brison (Dartmouth), Frederick Schauer (Virginia), Robert Simpson (Monash), Seana Shiffrin (UCLA), Jason Stanley (Yale), and David Strauss (Chicago), among others. The instructors will meet with students for one hour a week before each speaker's arrival to discuss the paper (Monday, 4-5 pm). They will also meet with enrolled students for at least two two-hour sessions in Autumn to read and discuss at least Mill's On Liberty. Most of the visiting speakers will come in the Winter and Spring Quarters (roughly three per quarter). Attendance at all sessions of the Workshop is a requirement. JD students should contact bleiter@uchicago.edu with a resume and a brief statement of background and/or interest in the topic in order to secure permission to enroll. Philosophy PhD students may enroll without submitting these materials.
    Spring 2015
    Martha Nussbaum, Brian Leiter, Robert Simpson