Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • The Grand Jury: History, Law, and Practice

    LAWS 51603 - 01 (2) m, x
    The grand jury is one of the least-understood institutions within the United States criminal justice system. A pre-constitutional institution with medieval English origins, the grand jury system that survives today is unique to the United States. Critics suggest that the grand jury has become an institution that is paradoxically both too powerful and obsolete, and that its independence and role as a safeguard of liberty has been compromised. In contrast, other proposals have sought to expand the grand jury’s authority to disclose its secret proceedings for national security purposes and to use grand jury evidence in parallel civil litigation. This seminar will examine critically the historical origin, development, and purposes of the grand jury. With this foundation, we will then devote most of the seminar to studying modern grand jury practice, including the law of secrecy and disclosure, parallel proceedings, the role of immunity and privileges, obstruction and false statement prosecutions, charging instruments, and the regulation of prosecutorial discretion. In doing so, we will consider the perspectives of counsel for witnesses or subjects, government prosecutors, and broader policy interests. Finally, we will consider reform proposals, alternatives to the grand jury, and how the institution may evolve. Grades will be based on response papers together with participation and practical exercises.
    Autumn 2014
    Mark E. Schneider
  • The Interbellum Constitution

    LAWS 90203 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the legal and intellectual history of debates concerning American constitutional law and politics between the Revolution and the Civil War, approximately 1800 to 1860. Topics to be discussed include internal improvements, the market revolution, federal regulation of slavery in the territories, the role of the federal courts, and the development of a national culture. The grade will be based on a final written paper, a short in-class presentation, and class participation.
    Winter 2015
    Alison LaCroix
  • The Law and Ethics of Lawyering

    LAWS 41014 - 01 (3) m, p, x
    This seminar, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, will consider the law and ethics of lawyering. Working with materials from a leading casebook, the ABA Model Rules, and supplementary readings, we will devote considerable attention to the question: What does the law that governs lawyering say that I should do. Topics will include conformity to law, corporate fraud, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest. At the same time, we will explore the gap between what the law of lawyering says I should do and what I (all things considered) might think I should do. What different kinds of reasons can a lawyer have for doing or not doing what the law of lawyering says should be done? Enrollment will be limited to 20. Students will be evaluated on the basis of participation, a series of short written assignments, and an in-class final exam. Attendance is mandatory.
    Winter 2015
    Clark Remington
  • The Legal and Social Implications of the War on Drugs

    LAWS 98704 - 01 (2) m, x
    The seminar will survey the War on Drugs from President Richard Nixon’s declaration in 1970 that drug abuse was “public enemy number one in America” to present. It can be argued that no development in recent times has had a greater impact on our criminal justice system than the War on Drugs. It has led to the passage of increasingly harsh laws and a resulting explosion in our prison population. More Americans are arrested for a drug offense each year—approximately 1.5 million in 2011—than for any other category of crime. Approximately half of all inmates in federal prison have been convicted of a drug crime. Meanwhile, the War on Drugs has raised significant constitutional issues, and has led to seminal Fourth, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendment decisions. The seminar will begin by examining arguments for and against drug prohibition and the proliferation of new drug laws in the 1970s and 1980s. We will then discuss the enforcement of these laws and its effect on civil liberties. After that, we will discuss appropriate punishment for drug offenses, law enforcement techniques in drug cases, and rationales for legalization and harm reduction strategies. Throughout the quarter, we will focus on the social implications of the War on Drugs, including issues of race, gender, public health, mass incarceration, and resource allocation. Readings are varied and will include cases, law review articles, legislation, statutes, and policy papers. Each student is required to write a series of reaction papers over the course of the quarter. Grades will be based on those papers, as well as class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Erica Zunkel
  • The Life and Times of the Warren Court

    LAWS 50313 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w
    This seminar will explore the historical and constitutional dimensions of the Warren Court. It will examine the Court's decisions in such areas as racial discrimination, voting, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, criminal procedure, and privacy. The focus will be not only on the decisions, but also on the historical, political, legal, and cultural factors that shaped the Warren Court's work. We will also examine several of the Justices as individuals as well as the Warren Court's legacy. Each student will write several short papers during the course of the quarter. Upper-level History undergraduates with consent of instructors.
    Spring 2015
    Geoffrey R. Stone, Jane Dailey
  • The Roberts Court

    LAWS 50312 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    Co-taught by Professor Lee Epstein and Mr. Adam Liptak (Supreme Court correspondent of the New York Times) with Judge Richard A. Posner and Professors Dennis Hutchinson and William M. Landes also participating, this seminar will examine the contemporary Supreme Court. Topics include the Court's membership; its procedures for selecting cases for review; the role of lawyers, law clerks, and journalists; and doctrinal developments in several areas of the law. This is a special seminar that will meet on: Friday, April 10, 2015: 9 am-Noon; 2-4 pm Saturday, April 11, 2015: 9 am-Noon; 2-4 pm Sunday, April 12, 2015: 9 am-Noon In April or May, we will hold a session for student paper presentations
    Spring 2015
    Richard A. Posner, Dennis J. Hutchinson, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein, Adam Liptak
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Law Review

    LAWS 99901 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Law Review publishes articles and book reviews by leading scholars along with Comments written by students. In addition to participating in the editing and publication of legal scholarship, staff members have the unique opportunity to develop their own skills as writers and scholars. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition (which includes a Grade-on component) or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Law Review, visit http://lawreview.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding the competition, credits, and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Winter 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The University of Chicago Legal Forum

    LAWS 99902 - 01 (1) a, r
    The Legal Forum is the Law School’s topical law journal. Its student board annually publishes a volume of articles (by academics and practitioners) and Comments (by students) that focus on a single area of the law. Each fall the Legal Forum hosts a symposium at which the authors of the articles present their work. Students gain access to participate as a staff member via the Write-on Competition or via the Topics Access process. Each student is paired with a faculty member who supervises the writing of the comment. Students may receive three credits for their work in writing the comments. The comments may also satisfy the SRP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details regarding credits and the SRP. For more information on the Legal Forum, please visit http://legal-forum.uchicago.edu.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • The US-China Treaty Project

    LAWS 80806 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The United States and China are engaged in the most important bilateral relationship of our era, yet the relationship remains random, fragile, and mistrustful. China’s rising influence threatens to change the global status quo, and the United States is understandably concerned. If these two giants learn how to collaborate, they could conceivably solve the world’s greatest problems. Alternatively, if they elect to contest each other at every turn, the result will be global instability and crisis. Unfortunately, the Shanghai Communiqué, which helped to open China forty years ago, is no longer sufficient as a guide; a new framework is needed. The world has grown less structured and more volatile, and the two nations are more competitive than ever. The risk of conflict is growing along with the volume of sensitive interactions. It is time for both nations to negotiate a new bargain that will guide and support the steady maturation of their high-potential, high-risk relationship. This seminar will advocate that the two nations develop a new, fifty-year treaty in the form of a strategic cooperation agreement. We will define the rationale and the case for action, draft major components of the proposed treaty, outline the pathway required for adoption, and transmit our end-product to foreign policy authorities in Washington and Beijing. Grading will be determined by class participation and by performance across three short papers. The first paper will examine best practices in bilateral treaty development; the second will focus on critical factors in the future United States – China relationship; and, the third will require drafting of key components for the proposed treaty.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Manning
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is placed on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Autumn 2014
    Saul Levmore
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus. Note: Class will not meet on Friday, January 16, 2015.
    Winter 2015
    Lee Fennell
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Autumn 2014
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) dealing with injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including negligence and strict liability. Grades are based on a single final examination at the end of the two-quarter sequence, though participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Winter 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Trade Secrets

    LAWS 45902 - 01 (3) m, x
    This seminar will examine the law that governs the protection of trade secrets and other confidential proprietary information. This body of law is typically given short shrift in intellectual property courses, notwithstanding the importance of trade secrecy protection in the information-based economy. The goal of this seminar is to provide trade secrecy with more sustained attention. Most of the reading for the seminar will consist of trade secret case law, to be supplemented by some interdisciplinary readings on trade secrecy protection. Students will be graded on the basis of short response papers due every other week (some of which will require outside research) and class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Lior Strahilevitz
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 45701 - 01 (3) x
    Course covering federal and state doctrines governing trademarks, domain names, and geographical indications; state law unfair competition doctrines; trademark dilution; publicity rights; and federal registration of trademarks. The student's grade is based on a final proctored examination.
    Autumn 2014
    William M. Landes
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) s, u, x
    This class will focus on the trial phases of civil litigation. Simulated trial problems designed to promote knowledge of the litigation process and to afford individual experience in selected phases of trial practice will be employed to familiarize students with pragmatic tactical issues and solutions. Written trial materials will be used and instruction will by lecture, demonstration, and exercise (including a mini-trial). Students who have taken the Intensive Trial Practice Works