Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) of the liability for injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including as negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Saul Levmore
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) of the liability for injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, including as negligence and strict liability. The student's grade is based on a single final examination at the end of the Winter quarter.
    Autumn 2013
    Saul Levmore
  • Torts

    LAWS 30611 - 02 (3) 1L, a
    The focus of this course, offered over two sequential quarters, is on the Anglo-American system (mainly judge-created) of the liability for personal injury to person or property. Special stress is laid on the legal doctrines governing accidental injury, such as negligence and strict liability, assumption of risk, and the duty requirement. The rules for determining damages in personal-injury cases are discussed. Alternative theories of tort liability, e.g., moral and economic, are compared. The student's grade is based on a single final examination.
    Winter 2014
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 45701 - 01 (3)
    Course covering federal and state doctrines governing trademarks, domain names, and geographical indications; state law unfair competition doctrines; trademark dilution; publicity rights; and federal registration of trademarks. The student's grade is based on a final proctored examination.
    Autumn 2013
    William M. Landes
  • Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67603 - 01 (3) +, s, u, x
    This class will explore the trial lawyer's craft, with a focus on both the written submissions important in litigation and the courtroom skills required at various stages in the life of a case. The instruction will be by lectures, demonstrations, and participation in learning-by-doing exercises (including a mini-trial). Students will learn how to use motions, depositions, written discovery, expert witnesses, exhibits, and technology as effective litigation tools. Students who have taken LAWS 67503 Intensive Trial Practice Workshop or LAWS 91702 Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy may not take LAWS 67603 Trial Advocacy. While the instructors strongly recommend that students have a good understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence before taking the seminar, this is not an absolute prerequisite. Final grades will be based on class participation, performance during courtroom exercises and the mini-trial, a fifteen-page trial brief, brief in support of a motion, or post-trial brief, and two shorter written pieces. Performance in the mock trial will count for 60% of the students' grade. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.
    Winter 2014
    Tom Dutton, Kevin Van Wart
  • Trusts and Estates

    LAWS 45201 - 01 (3)
    This year we will attempt experimentally to escape the confines of the "case method," and approach our subject as an area for problem solving. I hope this will more closely mimic the actual practice of law. For each week a problem or question will be set. At the beginning of each week class members will be expected to hand in a one page informal response to the problem. For addressing the problem or question the case book can be considered the first resource to turn to but it need not be the only one. This course examines American systems governing the transfer of property at death and related issues, with occasional glances at other legal systems. We first address statutory schemes for intestate succession. We then contrast the relatively formalistic law of wills (including capacity, execution, modification and revocation, and interpretation) with will substitutes and other comparatively flexible non-testamentary means of transferring property at death, including trusts. We close with a look at fiduciary duties, and in particular the modern prudent investor rule. We will consider both Illinois statutes and the Uniform Probate Code and Trust Act. Recurring course themes are the idea of testamentary freedom; statutory and other constraints on the disposition of property; and legal and other responses to social and technological changes such as assisted conception, artificial life support, untraditional families, and changes in the predominant forms of wealth. Grades will be based on participation in class discussion, contribution to the class Wiki, and a final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Howard Helsinger, Michelle Huhnke
  • U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 50311 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar will provide an in-depth look at the Supreme Court---its current docket and recent trends in its decisions, the modern debate over its proper role, and both written and oral advocacy before the Court. In addition to class participation, students are graded on a legal brief (generally 15-25 pages in length) and on their performance in a moot court.
    Winter 2014
    Michael Scodro
  • U.S. Taxation of International Transactions

    LAWS 44601 - 01 (3) +
    This course provides a survey of the US tax treatment of both inbound (foreign investment in the US) and outbound (US investment abroad) transactions. Though the principal focus of the class is on the US tax rules, some attention is paid to the interaction between US and foreign tax systems through the operation of the tax credit and tax treaties. Introductory Income Tax is a recommended prerequisite. Students grades will be based on a three-hour examination.
    Winter 2014
    Julie Roin
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Autumn 2013
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Winter 2014
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Constitutional Law

    LAWS 63612 - 01 (1) a, m, r, w
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, exposes students to current academic work in constitutional law and theory and other areas of public law. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers, at six to eight sessions to be conducted regularly throughout the academic year. Enrollment may be limited. This workshop may be taken for fulfillment of the Substantial Research Paper graduation requirement. Grading is based on a substantial paper (or two shorter papers) plus brief reaction papers on each of the workshop papers. As an alternative to writing a long paper, you may write two or more extended reaction papers (i.e., 10-12 pages) to the papers presented in the workshop. You have to get our approval in advance for this option. We encourage it if you find that you have a lot to say about some of the workshop papers. If you wish to receive Writing Project (WP) credit for this option, you must submit a draft of each of the two long response papers to us and satisfactorily incorporate our suggestions.
    Spring 2014
    Aziz Huq, David A. Strauss
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Spring 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Winter 2014
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Judicial Behavior

    LAWS 63812 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    The Workshop on Judicial Behavior provides students with a unique opportunity to read and analyze cutting-edge scholarship that focuses on how judges reach their decisions. In a case law system such as that of the United States, a realistic understanding of judicial behavior, which conventional legal instruction does not convey, is essential to the understanding and practice of law. Over the course of the academic year, six scholars from the fields of law and the social sciences will present their work. By the end of the academic year, students will produce a major research paper on judicial behavior. The Workshop is limited to twenty law students; interested students should contact Prof. Landes (land@uchicago.edu) by the start of Autumn quarter 2013. It will meet eight times over the course of the academic year.
    Autumn 2013
    Richard A. Posner, Frank H. Easterbrook, William M. Landes, Lee Epstein
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m, x
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Autumn 2013
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Winter 2014
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Economics

    LAWS 56012 - 01 (1) a, m
    This workshop, conducted over three sequential quarters, is devoted to the intensive examination of selected problems in the application of economic reasoning to a wide variety of legal questions. Workshop sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers by faculty. In addition to workshop sessions, which occur approximately every other week, there will be discussion sessions, which will serve as opportunities for students to engage in in-depth, informal discussion of topics in law and economics with the instructor. This workshop does not require a research paper, but students interested in academic writing in law and economics are encouraged to use this workshop to develop their ideas. Grading is based on the completion of a series of reaction papers. Students enrolled in the workshop receive three credits; one in Autumn, one in Winter, and one in Spring.
    Spring 2014
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Spring 2014
    Martha Nussbaum, Sarah Conly
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, and law students.
    Autumn 2013
    Martha Nussbaum, Sarah Conly
  • Workshop: Law and Philosophy: Life and Death

    LAWS 61512 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l, m, r
    This is a seminar/workshop many of whose participants are faculty from various related disciplines. It admits approximately ten students. Its aim is to study, each year, a topic that arises in both philosophy and the law and to ask how bringing the two fields together may yield mutual illumination. Most sessions are led by visiting speakers, from either outside institutions or our own faculty, who circulate their papers in advance. The session consists of a brief introduction by the speaker, followed by initial questioning by the two faculty coordinators, followed by general discussion, in which students are given priority. Several sessions involve students only, and are led by the instructors. Students write a 20-25 page seminar paper at the end of the year. The course satisfies the Law School Substantial Writing Requirement. There are approximately four meetings in each of the three quarters. Students must therefore enroll for all three quarters. Students are admitted by permission of the two instructors. They should submit a c.v. and a statement (reasons for interest in the course, relevant background in law and/or philosophy) to the instructors by e mail. Usual participants include graduate students in philosophy, political science, and divinity, an