Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Network Industries

    LAWS 73501 - 01 (3)
    This course addresses state and federal regulation of price, quality, and entry, with an emphasis on the regulation of natural monopolies, cost-of-service rate-making, rate design, and the problem of partial competition within a regulated environment. While the scope of the course precludes a detailed investigation of any particular industry or system of regulation, particular attention is paid to electrical generation and transmission, the Internet, and telecommunications, with exposure to problems of the other network industries, such as transportation and consumer electronics. This course emphasizes the substantive law and regulated industries and pays scant attention to the procedural questions addressed in Administrative Law, which should be taken at some point, but which is not a prerequisite for this course. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Randal C. Picker
  • Obscenity Law and Pop Culture

    LAWS 53013 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar will examine a culturally relevant issue: the intersection of obscenity laws and pop culture. It will provide an in-depth look at the obscenity laws in the United States, with a particular focus on the laws that prohibit obscene materials of minors. The seminar will explore the "community standards" requirement of obscenity, as it relates to the definition of obscenity and how it interacts with the law's treatment of a teenager's ability to consent to being featured in obscene material. Students enrolled will write a seminar paper.
    Spring 2014
    Rachael Pontikes
  • Originalism and its Critics

    LAWS 76803 - 01 (3) +, m, r, x
    This seminar covers a prominent and controversial method of constitutional interpretation -- originalism. Students will read judicial opinions and academic scholarship on different aspects of the original meaning of the Constitution, as well as theoretical scholarship for and against originalism, and scholarship confronting challenges such as precedent and changing circumstances. A prior constitutional law course is highly recommended. Grading will be based on class participation and a research paper.
    Winter 2014
    Eric Posner, William Baude
  • Partnership Taxation

    LAWS 44301 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    This course examines income tax aspects of partnerships. Partnerships have become a widely used business structure, particularly since the invention of limited liability companies (which are treated as partnerships for tax purposes) and the increase in the number of start-up ventures and sophisticated financial ventures such as hedge funds and private equity funds that rely upon partnership tax principles to maximize after-tax returns of investors and management. The course uses problem sets to illustrate the application of basic principles to formations, income and loss allocations, borrowings, and distributions of partnerships, with a special focus on applying the tax rules in a transactional setting. Introductory Income Tax is a prerequisite. The student's grade is based on a final examination and class participation. Note: The class will be taught downtown in the Blue Cross/Blue Shield building at 300 E. Randolph St. Students are to arrive a few minutes early each week to get through security.
    Spring 2014
    Richard Lipton, Todd Golub
  • Patent Claim Construction: A Hands-On Introduction to Patent Litigation

    LAWS 78002 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The interpretation of patent claims, or claim construction, is the single most important event in patent litigation and is often case-dispositive. This seminar will expose students to this complex, fascinating, and crucial aspect of patent litigation by having students undertake the claim construction process used by many courts. Students will develop proposed interpretations, write claim construction briefs, and conduct a claim construction hearing. At the same time, readings and class discussions will provide students a deep understanding of the extensive case law and scholarship surrounding claim construction. While some experience with patents--from prior classes, summer jobs, etc.--may be helpful, this seminar is intended to be accessible even for patent novices. Patent litigation is an increasingly important practice for large law firms, and many young associates will find themselves working on patent cases even if they have no technical background or strong interest in patent law. This seminar is intended to expose these future associates to the key issue that resolves most patent cases. Thus, no technical background or knowledge of patent law is required, and the patent used for the seminar's claim construction process will involve simple technology that is easy for anyone to understand.
    Spring 2014
    Greg Reilly
  • Patent Law

    LAWS 78001 - 01 (3)
    This is a basic course in patent law, in which the class is introduced to the governing statutes, core concepts, and influential court decisions. No technical expertise is necessary whatsoever, and students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll. Patent cases often involve complicated technologies, but the key to understanding the relevant legal issue almost never turns on an understanding of the patented technology itself. Student grades are based on a take-home final examination. Students from all backgrounds -- technical or not -- are encouraged to enroll.
    Spring 2014
    Jonathan Masur
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Spring 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Autumn 2013
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic

    LAWS 67243 - 01 (1) a, s, w
    The Post Incarceration Reentry Clinic (PIRC) will assist individuals returning to society after detention and imprisonment. Approximately 600,000 people are annually released from state and federal prisons in the United States; in Illinois, about 40,000 prisoners return to their communities each year and a substantial percentage of Illinois prisoners return to a small number of Chicago neighborhoods (several on the Southside) where they encounter restricted housing, employment, and educational opportunities, inadequate social, medical, and mental health services, real obstacles to care and provide for their families, and other policies and practices that make it difficult to become productive members of the community. Students will be engaged in individual representation, policy reform, and public education. In terms of direct representation, students may interview and counsel clients, prepare and present witnesses at hearings before the Circuit Court of Cook County or the Prisoner Review Board, provide advice and assistance on reviewing criminal records, prepare petitions for expungement and sealing of records, apply for certificates of good conduct and relief from disabilities, provide counsel in parole and probation revocation proceedings, and consider petitions for executive clemency and other post-conviction relief. With regard to policy and public education, we will, inter alia, collaborate with other community organizations and providers in advocating for alternatives to incarceration, legislative reform, and the elimination of barriers to employment, housing, public benefits, and education for those with criminal records. PIRC will engage in effective interdisciplinary collaboration with the Clinic social worker and social work students as well as related law school clinics, interested academics, and other university departments and disciplines.
    Winter 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Randolph N. Stone
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (3) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (20%), one paper-10 pages minimum (10%), and work at LAF (70%).
    Winter 2014
    Lawrence Wood
  • Poverty and Housing Law Clinic

    LAWS 90512 - 01 (4) a, s
    This clinic, conducted over two sequential quarters, exposes students to the practice of poverty law work by giving them the opportunity to work on housing cases at LAF, which provides free legal services to indigent clients in civil matters. Students will spend twelve hours per week in LAF’s Housing Practice Group, and may be asked to attend administrative grievance hearings, represent defendants in eviction actions, prevent landlords from performing lockouts or refusing to make necessary repairs, and participate in ongoing federal litigation. All students will be expected to interview clients, prepare written discovery, and draft motions. In addition to working at LAF, students will attend a weekly two-hour class at which they will learn about poverty law, subsidized housing programs, eviction actions, housing discrimination, the intersection between domestic violence and housing, using the bankruptcy code to preserve subsidized tenancies, challenging barred lists and "no trespass" policies, jury trial practice, and the extensive and often misunderstood connection between criminal law and subsidized housing. Enrollment is limited to twelve students. The seminar is taught by Lawrence Wood (Director, LAF’s Housing Practice Group). Each student's grade is based on his or her class participation (20%), one paper-10 pages minimum (10%), and work at LAF (70%).
    Spring 2014
    Lawrence Wood
  • Pre-Trial Advocacy

    LAWS 67403 - 01 (2) +, s, u, x
    This class focuses on fundamental pretrial litigation strategies and skills, including creation and evaluation of legal and factual theories, motion practice, interviewing clients, discovery planning, depositions, and pretrial preparation. The class employs a variety of learning methodologies, including lectures, small group discussions, simulated exercises, and oral arguments. Students taking Pre-Trial Advocacy are also eligible to enroll in the Intensive Trial Practice Workshop. Because of the overlap in topics, students are ineligible for Pre-Trial Advocacy if they have taken or are currently enrolled in any of the following litigation clinics: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Project Clinic; Civil Rights Clinic: Police Accountability; Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Complex Mental Health Litigation Clinic; Exoneration Project Clinic; Employment Discrimination Clinic; Employment Law Clinic; Abrams Environmental Law Clinic; and Federal Criminal Justice Clinic. The student's grade is based on class participation and written work product. Evidence is a prerequisite (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2014
    Erin Kelly
  • Privacy

    LAWS 79501 - 01 (2) m, x
    Privacy is the study of society’s efforts to draw boundaries between different contexts in which information flows. This seminar surveys various legal regimes governing the collection, use, and dissemination of information, with potential topics of interest including government surveillance, privacy-related First Amendment issues, the privacy torts, consumer privacy on the Internet, associational privacy, medical privacy, the Freedom of Information Act, and international privacy regimes. Students’ grades will be based on reaction papers and class participation.
    Spring 2014
    Roger Ford
  • Private Equity in Asia

    LAWS 71407 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Private equity is expanding rapidly into new regions of the world. Asia, where profound economic change is taking place in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Viet Nam, offers attractive opportunities for Western firms seeking to export proven investment models. Firms like Carlyle, KKR, and Bain Capital, among others, expect their operations in Asia to excel in both growth and rate of return and eventually rival operations in the United States and Europe in scale. Asian nations present unique challenges to private equity investors. These challenges include partnering with governments in state-sponsored transactions, participating as minority investors in contrast to the more typical majority or controlling position, dealing with new or opaque laws, overcoming fraud and corruption, and mitigating the risk of weak corporate governance. Additionally, domestic funds are sprouting up in large numbers and becoming more formidable in the competition for the best deals. This seminar will address the current developments in private equity across major countries in Asia. We will review the nature and rise of the industry in the region, the role of private equity as a new tool in the economic development of Asian nations, and the success and failure of recent Asian private equity deals. Grading will be determined by class participation in the discussion of cases and readings – and by performance across three short papers. The first paper will examine private equity in the macro-context of economic transformation; the second will focus on issues in a recent case study; and the third will address terms in a prospective deal negotiation.
    Winter 2014
    Tom Manning
  • Private Equity Transactions: Issues and Documentation

    LAWS 71402 - 01 (3) +, m, s, x
    This seminar will examine from a practical perspective the issues and documentation arising in a typical private equity acquisition transaction. The seminar will follow this type of transaction through its various stages and provide students in-depth and practical experience with common deal issues and drafting contractual provisions to address those issues. The goal of the seminar is to help prepare students for the practical aspects of being a deal lawyer. Coursework will include reading acquisition contracts, cases and legal commentators and weekly written assignments (contract drafting and issue analysis). Grades will be based on class participation and the written assignments. Corporations and Contracts are prerequisites.
    Winter 2014
    Mark Fennell, Stephen Ritchie
  • Private Regulation

    LAWS 95103 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the role of private non-governmental entities in regulating standard of behavior in society. It explores prominent cases in which private entities set standards, regulate entry, monitor compliance, and impose sanctions in activities related to risk, health, safety, finances, living standards, and privacy. Private regulators can act as complements—but also as substitutes—to government regulation. For example, retailers regulate safety, environmental, and labor practices of their suppliers; hospitals regulate professional practices of physicians; insurers regulate the safety practices of their policyholders; universities regulate innovation and the development of knowledge; trade associations regulate conduct in their industries; and Google regulates a host of issues, from privacy and decency to branding and even geo-political mapping. Students will be required to write (SRP-level) papers on case studies, examining particular examples of private “outsourced” regulations and evaluating their advantages and shortcomings relative to public regulation.
    Autumn 2013
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Professional Responsibility

    LAWS 41016 - 01 (3) m, p, x
    This seminar will focus on the rules governing the legal profession and practical applications of the rules. Course materials will include the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and a leading casebook; we may also read supplemental materials from time to time. Grades will be based on an in-class final exam, a 10-12 page research paper, and a class participation component. This seminar will fulfill the professional responsibility requirement.
    Spring 2014
    Martha Pacold
  • Professional Responsibility in the Real World

    LAWS 41013 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, addresses real world ethical issues and challenges facing attorneys in private practice and public service. The instructors, members of a major international law firm, will make the rules governing the professional responsibilities of lawyers come alive by discussing a number of examples taken from the headlines and daily practice. Along the way, the instructors will give meaningful insight into what it is like to practice law in a broad range of practice areas, including transactions, litigation and public service. Class attendance and participation will be an essential aspect of this course. The student's grade will be based on class participation, a substantial series of short take-home exercises and a final, take-home examination.
    Winter 2014
    Michael Sweeney, James E. Clark, Teresa Wilton Harmon
  • Project and Infrastructure Development and Finance

    LAWS 42512 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, w, x
    This seminar will be of most interest to students interested in financial transactions as the core of a corporate law practice. There are no pre-requisites. The emphasis in this seminar will be on financings of identified operating assets, principally industrial and infrastructure projects and transportation equipment. These financings will be distinguished from financings of ongoing corporate enterprises, and representative transactions will be studied in depth in order to develop and then focus on selected legal structuring and legal practice issues, including, for example, legal opinions normally delivered at financial closings. Because these financings in practice employ nearly the full range of financial products, from commercial bank loans to capital market instruments, credit supports and derivatives, collateral security, and equity investments, the issues discussed have relevance to a broad range of financial transactions. The class will be discussion oriented; there will be no exam and grades will be based on short papers and class participation. The readings will include selected cases, portions of treatises and academic journals, and rating agency and official publications. One or more guest speakers from the financial community are expected. Corporation Law is not a prerequisite, but is recommended. Students wishing to take the class for three credits must complete a substantial research paper. This option is available in limited circumstances only. Permission will be contingent on the student’s past experience, goals for the course, and topic suitability. Interested students should email the professor a brief statement of interest. Students wishing to meet the WP requirement must write a research paper. Enrollment is limited to twenty-five students.
    Autumn 2013
    Martin Jacobson
  • Property

    LAWS 30411 - 01 (3) 1L, a
    This course, offered over two sequential quarters, provides an introduction to the legal relationships that arise out of or constitute ownership of property. Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to, such areas as the initial acquisition of rights in real and personal property, the nature of ownership of natural resources, the various types of concurrent and successive interests in land, and restraints on alienation. The course will also deal with the law relating to easements and covenants, landlord and tenant, and conveyancing. The student'