Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Autumn 2015
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Winter 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Spring 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Autumn 2015
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Winter 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (3) a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product.
    Spring 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Labor History and the Law

    LAWS 92103 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the historical relationship between American workers and the law. It focuses on legal contests over workers’ rights in the courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies during the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings explore the ways in which law has shaped labor solidarity, class formation, and strategies for organization and resistance. They also consider the influence of organized labor and of labor law on mobilization for social change, including the movements for civil liberties and civil rights. The seminar concludes by exploring current trends in American labor relations, including recent efforts to curtail the collective bargaining rights of public employees.
    Spring 2016
    Laura Weinrib
  • Labor Law

    LAWS 43101 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the statutory, administrative, and judicial law governing collective labor relations. The principal subjects are union organizing and collective bargaining, with particular attention to the National Labor Relations Act. Students consider the strategies adopted by labor groups, employers, and legal actors in response to evolving economic and social conditions. The course draws on historical and comparative perspectives to evaluate emerging alternatives to the existing labor law regime. The grade is based on a final in-class examination and class participation.
    Winter 2016
    Laura Weinrib
  • Land Use

    LAWS 61301 - 01 (3)
    Few areas of law have as immediate an impact on our lived environment than the law of land use. This course will provide a broad introduction to the theory, doctrine, and history of land use regulation. Topics will include zoning, homeowners’ associations, nuisance, suburban sprawl, eminent domain and regulatory takings. Throughout, we will discuss the ways land use regulation affects land use patterns, economic efficiency, distributive justice, social relations, and the environment. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2016
    Richard A. Epstein
  • Law and Advances in Medicine

    LAWS 93302 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will address the intersection of medicine, science, and law, focusing on issues related to human research, informed consent, genetic technologies, and other advances in biotechnology. Enrollment is limited to 10 students. Students will write a significant research paper, submitted in three stages, which can be used to satisfy the Writing Project requirement and which will count for 50 percent of the grade. A Writing Project paper can be submitted on the first day of the following quarter. The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Julie Gage Palmer
  • Law and Language

    LAWS 95905 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the ways in which contemporary research in linguistics and philosophy of language might inform debates about interpretation within legal theory. Grades will be based on a series of short reaction papers and class participation (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a 15-page research paper.
    Spring 2016
    Ryan Doerfler
  • Law and Literature

    LAWS 99302 - 01 (2) c/l, l, m, x
    Both law and literature use the literary imagination to construct a persuasive and engaging dramatic narrative. The similarities found in legal and literary uses of narrative and the frequency of legal themes in fiction provide the skilled reader many opportunities to better understand both law and literature through a study of their intersection. In this discussion seminar, we will use the connections between law and literature to examine the development of law and the role of narrative in the practice of law. Through readings and discussion of great literature, we will critically analyze legal themes from their pre-law beginnings as wild justice through the development of law as an institution. We will apply the critical reading skills that are so essential in the interpretation of constitutions, statutes, rules, judicial opinions and documents to the understanding of literary texts, for which they are equally essential. To provide us with imaginative illustrations of legal issues, we will read selections ranging from Beowulf, Plato, Sophocles and Shakespeare, to works by Kafka, Tolstoy and Melville.
    Winter 2016
    Randy Berlin
  • Law and Politics: U.S. Courts as Political Institutions

    LAWS 51302 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w
    The purpose of this seminar is two-fold. First, the seminar aims to introduce students to the political science literature on courts understood as political institutions. In examining foundational parts of this literature, the seminar will focus on the relationship between the courts and other political institutions. The sorts of questions to be asked include: Are there interests that courts are particularly prone to support? What factors influence judicial decision-making? What effect does congressional or executive action have on court decisions? What impact do court decisions have? While the answers will not always be clear, students should complete the seminar with an awareness of and sensitivity to the political nature of the American legal system. Second, by critically assessing approaches to the study of the courts, the seminar seeks to highlight intelligent and sound approaches to the study of political institutions. Particular concern will focus on what assumptions students of courts have made, how evidence has been integrated into their studies, and what a good research design looks like.
    Winter 2016
    Gerald Rosenberg
  • Law and Practice of Zoning, Land Use, and Eminent Domain

    LAWS 90602 - 01 (3) +, l, m, w, x
    This seminar is a multi-disciplinary, multi-partisan discussion of the balance between private property rights and governmental regulation in land development. We primarily address (i) constitutional bases of private rights and public land use planning; (ii) eminent domain, takings and exactions (including impact fees and delays); (iii) current manifestations of local and regional planning and zoning, including City of Chicago Zoning Reform; and (iv) legal procedures and practical strategies for obtaining public financial incentives, land use approvals, and "relief" for real estate development projects, large and small. Prior course work in real property and constitutional law are encouraged. Course materials include cases, academic and trade-group commentaries, press coverage, and narrative and graphic exhibits for specific development projects. The student's grade is based on attendance, spirited class participation, and a paper.
    Autumn 2015
    Thomas Geselbracht, Theodore Novak, Paul Shadle
  • Law and Society

    LAWS 69003 - 01 (3)
    This course investigates the interrelations between the law and society. Topics include legal change and social change; markets and the moral economy; empirical legal research; compliance, obedience and rationality; the "law in action" and the "law on the books"; inequality and discrimination. Students are expected to attend the lectures and to complete all required readings. Grading will be based on a take-home exam (100%).
    Spring 2016
    Tamar Kricheli-Katz
  • Law and the Mental Health System

    LAWS 47001 - 01 (3) r, w
    The course examines the interrelationship between legal doctrine; procedural rules; medical, cultural, and social scientific understandings of mental disability; and institutional arrangements affecting the provision of services to the mentally disabled. Consideration is given to admission to and discharge from mental health facilities, to competency to consent to or to refuse treatment, to surrogate decision-making for those found incompetent, to the rights of those confined in mental health facilities; to discrimination against the mentally disabled, and to the rights of the mentally disabled in the criminal justice system. Grades are based on a final paper or a final take-home exam, and class participation.
    Autumn 2015
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Law of Agency, Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies

    LAWS 44302 - 01 (2) l, m, x
    Agency law deals with delegation of authority, vicarious liability and the duties of agents and principals to each other. One important component: Determining when one person's act binds or renders liable another person. Agency principles permeate, and are essential to understanding, a great many areas of substantive law, including contracts, torts, commercial and consumer law, corporation law, franchise law and administrative-regulatory law. This seminar examines the law of agency and also the law of partnerships, as agency principles form the cornerstone of partnership law. We will also consider some commonly used variants of general partnerships, such as limited partnerships and limited liability companies. The grade in the course is based on classroom participation and a written final examination.
    Autumn 2015
    Robert M. Berger
  • Legal Aspects of Sovereign Debt

    LAWS 75404 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This proposed seminar will examine the legal aspects of sovereign state borrowing. It will cover the elements of sovereign debt-- with emphasis on borrowing denominated in currencies other than those of the debtor, as well as Euro-denominated borrowings, the key contractual provisions of debt agreements, legal doctrines bearing on sovereign debt (such as sovereign immunity, odious debts and state succession), and the process for rescheduling or otherwise resolving impaired debt. We also will consider the roles of various international bodies, such as the IMF, and proposed international regimes for resolving defaulted debt. Once we have laid that foundation, we will consider the recent cases of Argentina, Greece and the legal aspects of the recently announced ECB bond purchase program. We will use Lastra and Buchheit, "Sovereign Debt Management", Oxford University Press 2014 and other materials to be provided by the Lecturer. There are no prerequisites for the seminar. The grade will be based on a paper of approximately 25 pages, as well as on class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Jim Foorman
  • Legal Elements of Accounting

    LAWS 79102 - 01 (1) +, s, x
    This mini-course introduces accounting from a mixed law and business perspective. It covers basic concepts and vocabulary of accounting, not so much to instill proficiency with the mechanics of debits and credits as to serve as a foundation from which to understand financial statements. The course then examines accounting from a legal perspective, including consideration of common accounting decisions with potential legal ramifications. It also analyzes throughout the reasons for and roles of financial accounting and auditing, as well as the incentives of various persons involved in producing, regulating, and consuming financial accounting information. The course will touch on some limitations of, and divergent results possible under, generally accepted accounting principles. Current cases, proposals, and controversies will be discussed. Attendance and participation will be very important. Grades will be based on a take-home final examination. Students with substantial prior exposure to accounting (such as students with an M.B.A., joint J.D./M.B.A. students, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors) may not take the course for credit. Students may not receive credit for both LAWS 79102 (Legal Elements of Accounting) and LAWS 79112 (Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys). Class will meet for nine sessions over the first three weeks of the quarter, as follows: Monday January 4-Friday January 8 and Tuesday January 19-Friday January 22
    Winter 2016
    John Sylla
  • Legal Profession

    LAWS 41002 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, will consider the law and the ethics governing lawyers. Among the topics that will be examined are the nature of the lawyer-client relationship, competency, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and some fundamental questions about who we are and what we stand for as lawyers. A student's grade is based on a final examination. This class will be capped at 50.
    Spring 2016
    Barry Alberts