Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 04 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2013
    John Rappaport
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 04 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    John Rappaport
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 04 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2014
    John Rappaport
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2013
    Roger Ford
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    Roger Ford
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 05 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2014
    Roger Ford
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2014
    Greg Reilly
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    Greg Reilly
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 06 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2013
    Greg Reilly
  • Legalistic Wrongdoing in Hitler's Europe and Postwar Restitution in American Federal Courts

    LAWS 96104 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar studies the discourse and doctrine of two major legal systems that functioned in Hitler's Europe to provide sustenance to an ongoing genocide. With a focus on courts and lawyers in Nazi Germany and in Vichy France, the readings involve primary documents, books, and articles about the way entire legal communities, with few protesters, used recognizable legal language and judicial institutions to accommodate grotesque variations upon what had been sound structures of reasoning and decision-making. We look not only at "what happened" but at "why" intelligent lawyers, trained in pre-War traditions including those of due process and egalitarianism, folded their tents and helped create a structure that totally violated those traditions. A connection will be made to contemporary American law, both in flagging analogous challenges in the 21st century and also in tracking in some detail litigation on behalf of Holocaust survivors or their heirs in American federal courts over the past 20 years, litigation that is ongoing in Chicago district court as the seminar proceeds.
    Spring 2014
    Richard Weisberg
  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation

    LAWS 44201 - 01 (3) e, x
    Much of lawyers' work today involves the close reading and interpretation of statutes or like texts. The focus of this class is the study of current interpretive theories and their application. The class also encompasses political theory and public choice approaches to the legislative process as they relate to legal interpretation. The class has the aim of bolstering students' capacity to work with statutes in law school and beyond. At the end of the class, students should have a thorough grasp of the process through which statutes are produced by the legislative branch and their interpretation by the courts. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Spring 2014
    Jennifer Nou
  • Life in the Law

    LAWS 99403 - 01 (2) m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the various definitions and valuations of life across diverse areas of the law. Readings will include seminal cases in reproductive rights, assisted suicide, right-to-die, and capital punishment. Background readings in related areas, i.e., scientific journals, papers, etc. will also be required. The seminar will discuss policy decision-making including actuarial analysis and social, medical and religious values inherent, implicit or ignored in the legal analysis. Students will be required to write three short papers, co-draft a statute in one area of law, and participate in jury deliberations. Grade will also be based on class participation.
    Spring 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers
  • Litigation Laboratory

    LAWS 91563 - 01 (3) s, u, w, x
    This simulation class brings lawyers and students together to analyze and develop aspects of the lawyers’ ongoing cases. It allows good lawyers to use law students for collaborative help with open cases, and allows law students to learn litigation skills by working with the lawyers. A different lawyer with a different case will participate in most class sessions. Typically the lawyer will provide materials for the students to review before the class. During the class, students will discuss, argue, debate, and work with the lawyer to solve hard issues. Following each class, students will complete written materials analyzing and evaluating the problem. In classes when lawyers are not included, students also learn practical litigation skills through various advocacy exercises. Students will be graded based on active participation and their written materials.
    Winter 2014
    Catherine Masters, James A. Clark
  • Local Government Law

    LAWS 71701 - 01 (3) e, x
    This course examines the law regarding provision of public goods and services at the state and local level. It explores the way in which local government law addresses the issues of what services a local government should provide, which residents should receive those services, who should pay for the services provided, and who should provide the answers to the previous questions. It explores the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular emphasis on judicial analysis of the constitutional and statutory bases of those relationships. Grading is based on a proctored final examination; participation may be taken into account as indicated on the syllabus.
    Spring 2014
    Lee Fennell
  • Major Corporate Transactions: Legal and Business Issues

    LAWS 64403 - 01 (2) m, x
    This seminar focuses on the issues that arise in structuring large-scale transactions across a large number of areas, such as mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings, and corporate reorganizations. Grades will be based on a series of reaction papers.
    Autumn 2013
    Douglas G. Baird
  • Marriage

    LAWS 68001 - 01 (3) +, c/l, r, w, x
    With the aim of making predictions and recommendations for the future, this course examines marriage as a state-sponsored institution, considering its history, its variants (e.g., common law marriage) and close substitutes (e.g., domestic partnership), conceptual frameworks for analyzing it (e.g., analogies between marriage and the business corporation or partnership or relational contract), past and future variants on the joining of one man and one woman (e.g., polygamy and same-sex marriage), and the use of marriage as an ordering principle in various areas of law. Constitutional Law III is a recommended prerequisite. The grade is based on a substantial paper, series of short reaction papers, or final examination, with class participation taken into account. Paper writers require permission of the instructor. Undergraduates require permission of the instructor.
    Spring 2014
    Mary Anne Case
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. Students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. The clinic also provides students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this course for between one and six quarters.
    Spring 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. With the permission of the clinical teacher, students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; research and draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present oral argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. In addition to discrete advocacy skills such as cross-examination, discovery planning, and legislative drafting, the clinic aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required, for all students. See the general rules for all clinical courses for further details concerning enrollment, including the rules governing the award of credit. There is a mandatory one-credit seminar component for this course which meets once a week during the Autumn Quarter. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this clinical course for between one and six quarters.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mental Health Advocacy Clinic

    LAWS 67013 - 01 (1 to 2) +, a, s, w
    Mental Health Advocacy teaches a variety of advocacy skills. Students may choose to focus on litigation, legislation, or both. Students engaged in litigation may interview clients and witnesses; draft pleadings and legal memoranda, including briefs to reviewing courts; conduct formal and informal discovery; negotiate with opposing counsel and others; conduct evidentiary hearings and trials; and present argument in trial and appellate courts. Students who have completed sixty percent of the credits needed for graduation may be licensed to appear, under the supervision of the clinical teacher, in state and federal trial and appellate courts pursuant to court rules and practices. Students engaged in legislative advocacy may research and draft legislation and supporting materials, devise and implement strategies to obtain the enactment or defeat of legislation, negotiate with representatives of various interest groups, and testify in legislative hearings. The clinic also provides students with an understanding of the relationships between individual advocacy tasks and the ultimate goals of clients, between litigation and legislative advocacy, and between advocacy on behalf of individual clients and advocacy for systemic change. Prior or contemporaneous enrollment in Law and the Mental Health System is encouraged, but not required. Mental Health Advocacy satisfies part of the writing requirement if substantial written work is completed. Student may enroll in this course for between one and six quarters.
    Winter 2014
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Mergers and Acquisitions

    LAWS 42311 - 01 (3) +, x
    In this course we will examine a number of the important legal and practical issues that arise in connection with mergers and acquisitions of U.S. businesses. These include: (1) the differences between mergers, tender offers, stock acquisitions and asset acquisitions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type of transaction; (2) the duties of directors in change of control transactions; (3) special considerations applicable to transactions, such as controlling shareholder buyouts or management buyouts, in which a director, officer or shareholder has a material conflict of interest; (4) disclosure issues in public M&A transactions; (5) issues that arise in connection with hostile takeovers and takeover defenses; (6) timing issues in public M&A transactions; (7) the enforceability of deal protection provisions in public merger agreements; (8) issues relating to fraud claims brought in M&A transactions; and (9) problems that arise between signing an M&A agreement and the closing of the transaction. The course materials will include relevant judicial decisions as well as examples of disclosure documents and merger, stock purchase and asset purchase agreements. Grades will depend on a final exam and class participation. Some of the topics in this course will also be covered more intensively in Buyouts, but that course is not a prerequisite for this course and students may take both courses. Students who have taken the Advanced Corporate Law: Mergers and Acquisitions seminar with Professor Barnard may not enroll in this course.
    Winter 2014
    Scott Davis