Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Jenner & Block Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic

    LAWS 67301 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Jenner & Block Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic represents parties and amici curiae in cases before the United States Supreme Court and other appellate courts. Students participate in the researching and drafting of merits briefs, amicus briefs, and cert petitions, conduct research on cases that may be suitable to bring to the Court, and help prepare and participate in moots of oral arguments. The clinic is supervised by clinical faculty, by Professor David Strauss, and by members of the Appellate and Supreme Court Practice group at Jenner & Block. Although the clinic’s focus is the U.S. Supreme Court, the clinic may also handle cases at the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and the Illinois Supreme Court. U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice (LAWS 50311) is a required pre-requisite for participating in the clinic. Academic credit for the clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2016
    David A. Strauss
  • Judicial Federalism

    LAWS 59903 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    In this seminar, we will explore the various doctrines that police the line between the role of the federal court system and the often-parallel role of the state courts (or occasionally tribal courts). Those doctrines include, for example, the limits on the subject-matter jurisdiction of the federal courts found in Article III; the Rooker-Feldman doctrine; common-law limitations on federal authority such as those for domestic relations and probate cases; the various abstention doctrines (Pullman, Burford, Younger, Colorado River); the Anti-Injunction Acts; notions of lis pendens that apply in both federal and state courts; and "complete" versus defense preemption. Each meeting will involve a discussion of one or more of these doctrines. Students will write a paper (which can qualify for the substantial writing requirement) for credit in the seminar.
    Winter 2016
    Diane P. Wood
  • Judicial Opinions and Judicial Opinion Writing

    LAWS 52003 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    For many graduates of this law school, their first job is as a judicial law clerk, usually in a federal court of appeals. A few graduates will eventually become judges. More important, many, many graduates will have a litigation practice. As law clerks or judges, they must learn to write judicial opinions. As practicing lawyers, they must learn to think like judges so that they will know how to communicate with them effectively, in briefs and at oral argument: something few lawyers know how to do. The seminar aims to teach law students how to think and write like judges, and so to equip them for a future as law clerks, judges, practicing lawyers--or all three.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Robert Hochman
  • Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication

    LAWS 47411 - 01 (3) e, x
    An examination of classic jurisprudential questions in and around the theory of adjudication: the theory of how judges actually do decide cases and how they ought to decide them. These questions include: Do legal rules really constrain judicial decision-making? What makes a rule (or norm) a rule of the legal system? Are principles of morality legally binding even when such principles have not been enacted into a law by a legislature? (Relatedly, are there objective principles of morality?) When no legal norm controls a case, how ought judges to decide that case? Can there be right answers to legal disputes, even when informed judges and lawyers disagree about the answer? Are there principles or methods of legal reasoning that constrain judicial decision-making, or is legal reasoning essentially indeterminate, such that a skillful judge can justify more than one outcome for any given dispute? Is judicial decision-making really distinct from political decision-making of the sort legislators engage in? Readings drawn exclusively from major twentieth-century schools of thought - especially American Legal Realism (e.g., Karl Llewellyn, Jerome Frank), Natural Law (e.g., Ronald Dworkin, John Finnis), and Legal Positivism (e.g., H.L.A. Hart, Joseph Raz) - supplemented by other pertinent readings (from Leslie Green, Richard Posner, and the instructor, among others). No familiarity with either jurisprudence or philosophy will be presupposed, though some readings will be philosophically demanding, and the course will sometimes venture into (and explain) cognate philosophical issues in philosophy of language and metaethics as they are relevant to the core jurisprudential questions. Attendance at the first session is mandatory for those who want to enroll. Take-home essay exam.
    Spring 2016
    Brian Leiter
  • Juvenile Justice

    LAWS 60102 - 01 (2) c/l, m, x
    This seminar considers how our legal system should respond to crimes committed by minors. In particular, students consider the appropriateness of treating minors differently from adults in preventing, adjudicating, and imposing consequences for criminal behavior. Readings on adolescent development and urban sociology help inform discussions. The student’s grade is based on class discussion, and a series of short papers and/or blog posts. Enrollment is limited to 20.
    Spring 2016
    Emily Buss
  • Kapnick Initiative Leadership Effectiveness and Development Lab I: Development

    LAWS 75710 - 01 (3) +, a, c/l
    Course 75710 is the first of a two-course series. This course develops the self-awareness and leadership effectiveness of the student facilitator to lead the Kapnick Leadership Initiative for the first-year Law students (1Ls). This course uses a team-oriented work environment and a series of classroom presentations and discussions to catalyze students’ efforts to develop as leaders. The goal of this experiential lab course is for students to master facilitation skills. Class time is spent working on teams, creating and mastering module content, presenting and leading discussions, motivating and influencing colleagues and 1Ls, giving and receiving feedback, and building relationships. Its two distinct components are: Development (LAWS 75710, see below) and Implementation (see LAWS 75711). In the Spring Quarter facilitators are focused on personal development. They work with Chicago Booth’s Coaches and staff to build their self-awareness and facilitation skills. Facilitators work in their designated four-person squad to select specialties from key leadership topics, then collaboratively develop and master the material to lead different modules and events. Students do not need to bid for this course. Interested students apply during Autumn quarter of their 2L year and undergo an extensive and competitive application process. Students are assessed on their ability to develop the requisite knowledge and skills to run the program and their effectiveness at doing so. One component of the grade is based on feedback that facilitators are expected to give and receive from other facilitators. Class attendance in both Spring and Autumn quarters is mandatory. Cannot be taken Pass/Fail. Numerical grade issued at the end of the Autumn 2016 quarter.
    Spring 2016
    Stacey Kole
  • Kapnick Initiative Leadership Effectiveness and Development Lab II: Implementation

    LAWS 75711 - 01 (1) +, a, c/l
    This is the second of a two-course series to develop the self-awareness and leadership effectiveness of the student facilitator to lead the Kapnick Leadership Initiative for the first-year Law students (1Ls). The series is experiential in nature. Its two distinct components are: Development (see LAWS 75710) and Implementation (LAWS 75711, see below). The overarching mission of “Implementation” is to deliver an outstanding leadership effectiveness and development program during Autumn quarter for all the 1Ls. Each session for 1Ls is run by a team of four facilitators who are responsible for the learning experience of one Bigelow section. The Implementation phase begins with a Training Camp for the facilitators in early September followed by delivery to the 1Ls during the Law School Orientation and the first few weeks of Law School. The class ends with the successful recruitment of new facilitators for the following year's program. Students do not need to bid for this course. Students registered for the Spring 2015 quarter course (LAWS 75710) will be automatically registered for this course. Students are assessed on their ability to develop the requisite knowledge and skills to run the class and their effectiveness at doing so. One component of the grade is based on feedback that facilitators are expected to give and receive from other facilitators. Class attendance in both Spring and Autumn quarters is mandatory. Students receive a single numerical grade for both courses.
    Autumn 2015
    Stacey Kole
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Autumn 2015
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Winter 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 01 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Spring 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Autumn 2015
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Winter 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic

    LAWS 91562 - 02 (2 to 3) +, a, s, x
    The Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab Clinic provides students with a forum for working closely with legal and business teams at top-tier multinational companies, leading nonprofits, and smaller entrepreneurial and technology startups. The primary goal of the Corporate Lab is for students to learn practical legal skills, both substantively, in terms of the corporate “building blocks” necessary to understand complex transactions and agreements, and professionally, in terms of implementing such knowledge efficiently and meaningfully within the context of a wide array of careers as lawyers and business leaders. This class mirrors the real world work experience of both litigators and corporate lawyers: students will receive hands-on substantive and client-development experience and will be expected to manage and meet expectations and deadlines while exercising a high level of professionalism. As a result, this class is likely to involve a significant commitment (with a substantial amount of work to be completed outside of class). Clients include Fortune 100 Companies (e.g. Microsoft, Amazon, Northern Trust, Honeywell), Booth New Venture Challenge, non-profits (e.g. Chicago Symphony), and start-ups (including Pritzker-funded companies). Students will be required to sign nondisclosure agreements with participating clients. Corporate Lab students also will have the opportunity to negotiate a simulated transaction across the table from Northwestern Law students as part of the negotiation workshop component of the Corporate Lab (Autumn Quarter). Please note that (i) students are expected to remain in the Corporate Lab for a minimum of two consecutive quarters, (ii) students may not take the Corporate Lab for more than nine credits, (iii) this offering will not count toward seminar restrictions. Grades will be based upon participation in the classroom, appropriate attention to client services, collaborative efforts within a team environment, and quality of work product. 3 credits or, with permission of instructor, 2 credits.
    Spring 2016
    David Finkelstein, David Zarfes, Sean Z. Kramer, Maureen Mosh, Ellis A. Regenbogen
  • Labor History and the Law

    LAWS 92103 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines the historical relationship between American workers and the law. It focuses on legal contests over workers’ rights in the courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies during the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings explore the ways in which law has shaped labor solidarity, class formation, and strategies for organization and resistance. They also consider the influence of organized labor and of labor law on mobilization for social change, including the movements for civil liberties and civil rights. The seminar concludes by exploring current trends in American labor relations, including recent efforts to curtail the collective bargaining rights of public employees.
    Spring 2016
    Laura Weinrib
  • Labor Law

    LAWS 43101 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the statutory, administrative, and judicial law governing collective labor relations. The principal subjects are union organizing and collective bargaining, with particular attention to the National Labor Relations Act. Students consider the strategies adopted by labor groups, employers, and legal actors in response to evolving economic and social conditions. The course draws on historical and comparative perspectives to evaluate emerging alternatives to the existing labor law regime. The grade is based on a final in-class examination and class participation.
    Winter 2016
    Laura Weinrib
  • Land Use

    LAWS 61301 - 01 (3)
    Few areas of law have as immediate an impact on our lived environment than the law of land use. This course will provide a broad introduction to the theory, doctrine, and history of land use regulation. Topics will include zoning, homeowners’ associations, nuisance, suburban sprawl, eminent domain and regulatory takings. Throughout, we will discuss the ways land use regulation affects land use patterns, economic efficiency, distributive justice, social relations, and the environment. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Spring 2016
    Richard A. Epstein
  • Law and Advances in Medicine

    LAWS 93302 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will address the intersection of medicine, science, and law, focusing on issues related to human research, informed consent, genetic technologies, and other advances in biotechnology. Enrollment is limited to 10 students. Students will write a significant research paper, submitted in three stages, which can be used to satisfy the Writing Project requirement and which will count for 50 percent of the grade. A Writing Project paper can be submitted on the first day of the following quarter. The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on class participation.
    Spring 2016
    Julie Gage Palmer
  • Law and Language

    LAWS 95905 - 01 (2 to 3) l, m, w, x
    This seminar will explore the ways in which contemporary research in linguistics and philosophy of language might inform debates about interpretation within legal theory. Grades will be based on a series of short reaction papers and class participation (two credits). Students may earn a third credit by writing a 15-page research paper.
    Spring 2016
    Ryan Doerfler
  • Law and Literature

    LAWS 99302 - 01 (2) c/l, l, m, x
    Both law and literature use the literary imagination to construct a persuasive and engaging dramatic narrative. The similarities found in legal and literary uses of narrative and the frequency of legal themes in fiction provide the skilled reader many opportunities to better understand both law and literature through a study of their intersection. In this discussion seminar, we will use the connections between law and literature to examine the development of law and the role of narrative in the practice of law. Through readings and discussion of great literature, we will critically analyze legal themes from their pre-law beginnings as wild justice through the development of law as an institution. We will apply the critical reading skills that are so essential in the interpretation of constitutions, statutes, rules, judicial opinions and documents to the understanding of literary texts, for which they are equally essential. To provide us with imaginative illustrations of legal issues, we will read selections ranging from Beowulf, Plato, Sophocles and Shakespeare, to works by Kafka, Tolstoy and Melville.
    Winter 2016
    Randy Berlin
  • Law and Politics: U.S. Courts as Political Institutions

    LAWS 51302 - 01 (3) +, c/l, m, r, w
    The purpose of this seminar is two-fold. First, the seminar aims to introduce students to the political science literature on courts understood as political institutions. In examining foundational parts of this literature, the seminar will focus on the relationship between the courts and other political institutions. The sorts of questions to be asked include: Are there interests that courts are particularly prone to support? What factors influence judicial decision-making? What effect does congressional or executive action have on court decisions? What impact do court decisions have? While the answers will not always be clear, students should complete the seminar with an awareness of and sensitivity to the political nature of the American legal system. Second, by critically assessing approaches to the study of the courts, the seminar seeks to highlight intelligent and sound approaches to the study of political institutions. Particular concern will focus on what assumptions students of courts have made, how evidence has been integrated into their studies, and what a good research design looks like.
    Winter 2016
    Gerald Rosenberg