Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law Clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems in Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. There is no requirement for students to take any environmental law class or to have an environmental, science or engineering background before enrolling in the clinic; all are welcome. On behalf of organizational clients and affected persons, the Clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, holds government agencies accountable, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, and promotes innovative approaches for improving the environment. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as working with clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, and advocating through written and oral communications. Students also learn about the range of strategic and tactical approaches used by effective advocates.
    Spring 2014
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems throughout Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. On behalf of clients, the clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, fights for stricter permits, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, holds environmental agencies accountable, and develops innovative approaches for improving the environment. Through clinic participation, students learn substantive environmental law and procedures for addressing concerns through the courts or administrative tribunals. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as counseling clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, advocating through written and oral communications, planning cases, managing time, and addressing ethical issues and dilemmas. In addition, students develop an appreciation for the range of strategic and tactical approaches that effective advocates use. Some matters will be best resolved in front of a judge, others in an adversarial hearing, others through face-to-face meetings with government officials, and others by putting public pressure on a polluter or administrative agency. Any given matter may require the use of one or more of these approaches simultaneously or sequentially, although in general, the clinic will deploy adversarial approaches to help achieve its clients’ objectives.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

    LAWS 67813 - 01 (1 to 2) a, s
    The Abrams Environmental Law Clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems in Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. There is no requirement for students to take any environmental law class or to have an environmental, science or engineering background before enrolling in the clinic; all are welcome. On behalf of organizational clients and affected persons, the Clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, holds government agencies accountable, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, and promotes innovative approaches for improving the environment. Students develop a number of core advocacy competencies, such as working with clients, spotting issues, conducting factual investigations, performing practical legal research, and advocating through written and oral communications. Students also learn about the range of strategic and tactical approaches used by effective advocates.
    Winter 2014
    Mark N. Templeton
  • Accounting and Financial Analysis

    LAWS 79103 - 01 (3) +, s, x
    This course is designed to quickly introduce you to (or, preferably, refresh your knowledge of) basic financial accounting [first two weeks of class] and then aims to aggressively increase your ability to be a highly sophisticated user of financial statements. After taking this course, you should improve your ability to determine a firm's accounting policy for a particular type of transaction and to determine how that policy choice affects its primary financial statements. You will also learn how to question whether these effects fairly reflect the underlying economics of the firm's transactions. Asking these questions involves an interplay between accounting, economics, finance, law and business strategy. You should therefore greatly improve your ability to use an accounting report as part of an overall assessment of the firm's strategy and the potential rewards and risks of dealing with the firm. The teaching approach will be a roughly equal combination of lecture time and demanding case applications of the lecture material that will involve group case assignments that will form the basis for in-class discussion of the cases. The technical knowledge acquired from the lecture material is applied to cases where the main goal is to examine how the reported financial statements would differ if the firm had used different accounting policies. The focus is on modifying the reported financial statements in order to obtain the cleanest possible inputs for use in such applications as equity valuation, transaction structuring and credit analysis. The topics to be discussed are likely to include the accounting for, and interpretation of: revenue recognition, intercorporate investments, organizational structures (e.g., franchising), debt, and leases. Intensive group hand-in cases will be used to illustrate how the flexibility in financial reporting can reflect both the economics of the firm and the incentives of the managers creating the financial statements. It is strongly recommended that students registering for this course have some prior exposure to accounting course work, at least at the level of Fundamentals of Accounting for Attorneys (LAWS 79112) or Legal Elements of Accounting (LAWS 79102). Grading will be based on case assignments, short homework assignments, class participation, and a final exam.
    Spring 2014
    Philip G. Berger
  • Accounting for Lawyers

    LAWS 79201 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    The seminar is presented from the perspective of a practicing lawyer who must apply an understanding of accounting principles to provide relevant and accurate legal advice. While the seminar covers the fundamentals of accounting, it concentrates on their application in typical legal practice settings such as contracts, mergers and acquisitions, shareholder reporting, regulatory reporting, bankruptcy and litigation.
    Winter 2014
    David Bowers
  • Administrative Law

    LAWS 46101 - 01 (3)
    This course examines the structure of the administrative state, its relations to the other branches of government and private citizens, and the constitutional, statutory, and common law rules that govern the substance and procedure of administration action and inaction. The course focuses on some constitutional topics, including the non-delegation doctrine, presidential control over administrative agencies, and the delegation of adjudicative authority to non-Article III officers. Substantial attention is given to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other statutory requirements for lawful agency action. Covered topics include the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutory and regulatory law; judicial review of agency decisions; public participation in agency rulemaking; and non-traditional approaches to regulation, including negotiation and privatization. A central theme of the course is how the law manages the tension between rule of law values (e.g., procedural regularity, accountability, and substantive limits on arbitrary action) and the desire for flexible, effective administrative governance. The student's grade is based on a final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos
  • Administrative Law

    LAWS 46101 - 01 (3) x
    This course examines the structure of the administrative state, its relations to the other branches of government and private citizens, and the constitutional, statutory, and common law rules that govern the substance and procedure of administrative action and inaction. The course focuses on some constitutional topics, including the non-delegation doctrine, presidential control over administrative agencies, and the delegation of adjudicative authority to non-Article III officers. Substantial attention is given to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other statutory requirements for lawful agency action. Covered topics include the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutes; judicial review of agency decisions; and public participation in agency rulemaking. A central theme of the course is how the law manages the tension between rule of law values (e.g., procedural regularity, accountability, and substantive limits on arbitrary action) and the desire for flexible, effective administrative governance. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final examination.
    Autumn 2013
    Jennifer Nou
  • Admiralty Law

    LAWS 71001 - 01 (3)
    This course will cover the development and scope of this part of the jurisdiction of the federal courts, the role of the Supreme Court in the common law development of the substantive law of the admiralty, and several of the main elements of substantive maritime law: maritime torts, industrial accidents, collisions, salvage, and limitation of liability. The student's grade is based on class participation and a final take-home examination.
    Autumn 2013
    Randall D. Schmidt
  • Advanced Civil Procedure

    LAWS 52502 - 01 (3)
    This course examines salient features of major civil litigation from both a practitioner's and a policymaker's perspective. Broadly, these features fall into two categories: issues with forum and aggregation on the one hand, and problems with the collection and production of evidence on the other. Topics in the first category include class actions and arbitration. Topics in the second category include electronic discovery and preservation. In addition, this course studies how the federal rulemaking process, statutes, and judicial decisions compete to define the procedures that govern civil litigation. The student's grade is based on a final examination with some consideration of class participation.
    Spring 2014
    William H. J. Hubbard
  • Advanced Contract Drafting: General Corporate Agreements

    LAWS 79918 - 01 (2) +, m, s, x
    This seminar builds upon introductory contract drafting coursework and provides intensive instruction in the drafting and review of some of the most central types of contracts in general corporate legal practice. As such, it aims to develop students’ drafting skills and to prepare them to excel at all levels in law firms’ various corporate groups. We will begin the seminar by reviewing the different kinds of provisions that appear in any contract and reinforcing various key drafting considerations. With these principles in mind, we will then introduce and study several of the most important contracts on which corporate attorneys work, including merger agreements, credit agreements, and underwriting agreements. The majority of the seminar will be spent exploring these agreements, how their provisions interact with one another, and how best to draft and negotiate such agreements in the context of a client’s objectives, the specific nature of a transaction, its particular legal and business risks, and each party’s relative leverage in the negotiation. Throughout the seminar, students will engage in several drafting exercises both in and out of class and in group simulations involving both competition and collaboration. Materials will include publicly available agreements from actual transactions as well as form contracts that are often used as the basis for drafting. Grades will be based upon class participation, a series of drafting exercises, and a final take-home assignment. Contract Drafting and Review (LAWS 79912), or else instructor permission, is a prerequisite for registration in the seminar.
    Winter 2014
    Naveen Thomas
  • Advanced Contracts: Sales Law for A Modern Economy

    LAWS 48601 - 01 (3) s
    This course is an advanced contracts course that focuses on Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It presents the material from a hybrid jurisprudential, transactional and litigation perspective in an effort to help students integrate what they have learned about contracts in theory, into the types of tasks that they will face as a transactional lawyer. For (almost) every class students will prepare a written exercise (about 2-4 pages) applying the material in the reading, these range from writing letters to clients, to lecturing the loading dock staff of a company, to researching the content of industry norms, to drafting contract clauses to deal with particular transactional realities. During the quarter students will do a mock appellate argument, a negotiation, and will draft a sales agreement. There is no exam. Written assignments and the final contract will count for 60% of the grade, the other 40% will be based on class preparation and participation.
    Spring 2014
    Lisa Bernstein
  • Advanced Corporate Law: Mergers and Acquisitions

    LAWS 42311 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, x
    This seminar develops and applies the student’s knowledge of corporate and contracts law in the context of mergers and acquisitions. After introducing the general subject, the seminar will cover a broad range of fundamental topics (acquisition mechanics, successorship, transaction documentation, deal-specific litigation, and fiduciary duties) and then conclude with an in-depth analysis of the legal issues in a takeover battle. Booth students and interested law students may obtain an extra 25 units (for a total of 100 units) by electing to prepare a teaching case (similar to "Oracle's Hostile Takeover of PeopleSoft (A)," Stanford Business School, published May 30, 2006) addressing one of the following recent transactions: (i) Michael Dell's leveraged buyout of Dell, over the strenuous objections of Carl Icahn and various private equity investors, or (ii) the takeover battle involving Men's Wearhouse and Jos. A. Bank, with considerable involvement by the activist investor Eminence Capital, or (iii) the multi-dimensional, cross-border takeover battle involving Sprint, Clearwire, Dish, and Softbank. Students wishing to elect this extra-credit option must notify the professor by the end of week three. Students may work singly or in groups of two, and may use any reference materials (other than any teaching cases that might be published addressing the same transactions). The teaching cases will be due on or before the last day of class in week eight. The readings consist of a casebook, recent judicial opinions, scholarly commentary, and other background material. Corporations or Business Associations I and Contracts are prerequisites. Students who have taken the Mergers and Acquisitions course with Professor Davis may not enroll in this seminar. Grades will be based on class participation and an 8 hour take-home final exam.
    Spring 2014
    Douglas Barnard
  • Advanced Law and Economics: Theory and Practice

    LAWS 55401 - 01 (3) +, c/l, r, w
    This course examines theoretical and empirical work in the economic analysis of law. It will cover, among other things, optimal tort rules, models of contract liability and remedies, optimal criminal rules, settlement and plea bargaining, and models of judicial behavior. Students are required to be PhD students in the Economics Department, the Harris School or the Booth School, or law students. Students should have the equivalent of an undergraduate economics degree or have taken Economic Analysis of the Law in the Law School. The course will expect students to have Economics PhD-level math skills. Students will be required to submit 3-4 short research proposals related to topics covered in class. These proposals are sketches of original research that, once developed, could yield publishable academic papers.
    Spring 2014
    Anup Malani
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students’ knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper (minimum 20 pages for 3 credits; 10 pages for 2 credits). In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Winter 2014
    Sheri H. Lewis
  • Advanced Legal Research

    LAWS 79802 - 01 (2 to 3) m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of legal sources and to develop their ability to research the law. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including statutes, administrative law, legislative history, cases, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as corporate and securities, tax, transactional, federal procedure, and intellectual property, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). Students may earn either 2 or 3 credits for this seminar depending upon the number of assignments completed and the length of their final paper. A 20-25 page paper will be required for the 3-credit option for this course, along with 4 research assignments. For the 2-credit option for this course, students will write a 10-15 page paper and complete 2 research assignments. Research assignments will count towards 30% of the final grade; the research paper 60%. Class participation counts for 10%. In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Autumn 2013
    Todd Ito
  • Advanced Legal Research: Foreign and International Law

    LAWS 79803 - 01 (2) c/l, m, s, x
    The purpose of this seminar is to enhance students' knowledge of foreign, comparative, and international legal sources and to develop their global legal research skills. The seminar will cover the basic categories of legal research in depth and with a focus on practical skills and efficiency, including locating constitutions, legislation, treaties, cases, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations such as the EU, UN, WIPO, and the WTO, and secondary sources. This seminar also will address a series of practice areas such as comparative corporate law (focus on cross-border practice areas), comparative constitutional law, international intellectual property, international criminal law, international trade law, international environmental law, and international human rights, focusing on the substantive resources and practical research skills for each. It will also highlight gaps in international legal research resources and techniques for bridging them. Upon successful completion of the seminar, students will expand their understanding of research resources in a variety of areas, will improve their skills in using international legal research tools, and will develop extensive research knowledge in at least one area from their work on a final research paper. The seminar will be limited to twenty-five students with priority given to third year students. To receive credit for this seminar, students must complete 2 research assignments (30 percent of grade), submit a 10-15 page research paper on a topic approved by the instructor (60 percent of grade), and attend and participate in course meetings (10 percent). In the research paper, the student should extensively and comprehensively address sources for researching the topic, discuss successful and less useful techniques, and recommend research strategies.
    Spring 2014
    Lyonette Louis-Jacques
  • Advanced Legal Writing

    LAWS 79901 - 01 (2) +, s, w, x
    This course will prepare law students for the working world by honing writing skills for briefs, memoranda, motions and contracts. We will discuss and practice the major principles of legal writing in plain English -- no jargon, no legalese, no anachronistic fluff. In addition to fine-tuning basic and more advanced writing skills, students will learn how to use their writing to win arguments, persuade clients and sharpen their own thinking. The class will function largely as a workshop where we analyze the impact of various writing styles. Regular attendance is essential. Through exercises and group critiques, students will learn to write more succinctly and effectively. Better writers make better lawyers. The course concludes with an eight-hour take-home examination, which determines the student's grade. Students must complete all assignments before the exam. This course satisfies the requirements of the Writing Project writing requirement. Legal Research and Writing is a pre-requisite. NB: The first meeting of this class will be 6:10-8:10 p.m. on Thursday, March 27. All other meetings will be on Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00 p.m. The class will not meet Tuesday, April 1.
    Spring 2014
    Elizabeth Duquette
  • Advanced Topics in Corporate Reorganizations

    LAWS 43702 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, w, x
    This seminar will explore emerging issues in corporate reorganization. We are principally interested in the ever-present tension between bankruptcy law and policy and the practical reality of managing a company’s business in Chapter 11. The seminar will address four broad topics: asset sales, inter-creditor agreements, post-petition financing, and the safe harbors for financial contracts. We will devote two seminar meetings to each topic. During the first, we will discuss case law and hypotheticals, academic and practice-oriented articles, and pleadings, briefs and orders from recent Chapter 11 cases. During the second meeting, we will invite a leading professional to join our seminar and discuss his or her perspectives on the topic that we are studying. Students will lead this discussion. If time permits, our group will join the professional for dinner after the seminar. Grades will be based on class participation (40%) and four short papers (60%). The papers are intended to prepare you to engage deeply in discussion with the invited professionals. Each paper should not exceed six double-spaced pages, should analyze and raise questions about an aspect of a topic that we are studying, and should be submitted no later than noon on the day when we are hosting a professional. Although there is no pre- or co-requisite for this seminar, we recommend that you have taken or are currently taking a course in bankruptcy law. The instructors are Professor Edward Morrison and Judge Christopher Sontchi of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware. Students wishing to take the seminar for three credits must write an additional 10-12 page research paper.
    Spring 2014
    Christopher Sontchi, Edward Morrison
  • Advanced Topics in Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy

    LAWS 78603 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    The topic for Winter 2014 will be "Ideology." What makes some moral, political, economic, or legal ideas "ideological," in the pejorative sense associated with the Marxian tradition? How do facts about the genesis of an ideology bear on its epistemic warrant? What is the relationship between ideology and "false consciousness"? How can an individual be mistaken about his interests? What concept of interests is needed for the theory of ideology and false consciousness? We will use some aspects of contemporary economics as a case study for the theory of ideology. Readings from some or all of Hegel, Marx, Horkheimer, Adorno, J. Elster, R. Geuss, M. Rosen, G. Becker.
    Winter 2014
    Brian Leiter, Michael Forster
  • Advanced Trademarks and Unfair Competition

    LAWS 69902 - 01 (2 to 3) m, w, x
    This seminar addresses current issues in trademark law and their evolution since the latter half of the 19th century, such as trademark law's constitutional foundations; competing justifications of trademark rights (incentivizing manufacturers while lowering consumer search costs, fostering commercial morality, protecting property rights, vindicating speech interests, and so on); the reciprocal development of trademark doctrine and commercial practice; the interplay of trademark and First Amendment law; statutory and judicial limitations on trademark rights and those limitations' normative underpinnings; counterfeiting, contributory infringement, and the online marketplace; and the peculiar role (especially in light of other nations' practices) of federal registrations in the acquisition and