National Lawyers Guild

Immigration, Asylum, and Sanctuary? A Case Study of Human Trafficking in China

Date: 
04.22.2011
Location: 
Room V, The Law School

Prof. Maria Woltjen of the Law School’s Immigrant Child Advocacy Clinic and several of her students discuss their experiences over the past year, including work on a field report on human trafficking in China.

Faculty: 
Maria Woltjen

Directing Traffic: The Migration Patterns and Consequences of Human Trafficking

Date: 
04.21.2011
Location: 
Room V

Prof. Charlotte Walker, head of the Human Rights Department at the University of Chicago, considers the impact of migration and criminal laws on sex trafficking—and vice versa—using in particular data and information from the EU, Turkey, and the Near East.

Pro Bono Coffee Mess (Part of Human Trafficking Series)

Date: 
04.20.2011
Location: 
Green Lounge

Join local non-profit organizations, PILS, and Susan Curry in the Green Lounge for a special Pro Bono Coffee Mess.  Organizations specializing and/or dealing with human trafficking, domestic violence, and gender violence victims will be on hand to provide information on legal and non-legal volunteer opportunities.

Human Trafficking: Global Problems, Global Solutions (Afternoon Lecture)

Date: 
04.18.2011
Location: 
Courtroom

Prof. Mohamed Mattar-- of the Georgetown Law Center and Johns Hopkins University's SAIS (School of Advanced International Studies) will present his research on the constitutional limitations and judicial application of various human trafficking statutes.  Prof.

Faculty: 
M. Todd Henderson

Human Trafficking: Global Problems, Global Solutions (Lunch Panel)

Date: 
04.18.2011
Location: 
Room III

Prof. Mohamed Mattar of the Georgetown Law Center and Johns Hopkins University’s SAIS (School of Advanced International Studies) will discuss, along with Prof. Tom Ginsburg, this growing international human rights problem and the importance (and lack of) international state cooperation.

Faculty: 
Tom Ginsburg

Criminal Law Society presents "Innocent on Death Row" co-spsonsored by the ACLU, Human Rights Law Society, National Lawyers Guild, and Witness to Innocence

Date: 
11.04.2010
Location: 
Law School Room III

Randy Steidl was an average, hard-working guy from a small farming community in southern Illinois. When questioned about the 1986 murders of newlyweds Dyke and Karen Rhoads, Randy assumed the police were questioning many people in the area. He did not know either of the victims but cooperated with the police and gave a corroborated alibi for the night of the murders. It was a sho