Public Service and Public Interest Law

Saul Levmore, "What Do Lawmakers Do?"

In this lecture, the first of this year’s Chicago’s Best Ideas series, Professor Levmore examines some aspects of lawmaking that do not make their way into the law school curriculum.

Lawmakers respond to constituents, seek higher office, have lofty goals, and even learn from their mistakes. But do they actually make the world a better place? In this lecture, the first of this year’s Chicago’s Best Ideas series, Professor Levmore examines some aspects of lawmaking that do not make their way into the law school curriculum.

Pro Bono: Log & Learn

Date: 
11.05.2015
Location: 
Room D

We know it's easy to forget to log your pro bono hours. That's why the Pro Bono Board is hosting the first regular "Log and Learn" on Thursday November 5th! Pro Bono Board members will kick off the event with a tutorial on how to log hours, and will be on hand to answer any questions related to pro bono work.

James B. Comey, '85: "Law Enforcement and the Communities We Serve: Bending the Lines Toward Safety and Justice"

James B. Comey, class of 1985, is the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

James B. Comey, class of 1985, is the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Recorded on October 23, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School.

Mary Anne Case in Debate: "Be It Resolved: Conflicts Between Civil Rights and Religious Liberties Can Be Addressed By Adopting Viable Compromise Solutions That Protect Both Values"

Luke Goodrich, '04, and Mary Anne Case, the Arnold I. Shure Professor of Law, debate.

Be it resolved: Conflicts between civil rights and religious liberties can be addressed by adopting viable compromise solutions that protect both values.

32nd Annual Jefferson B. Fordham Debate at the S. J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah.

Suing the Government Is a Growth Industry: How to make the most from your law degree (and your life) with a career in public-interest law

Date: 
10.07.2015
Location: 
Classroom B (34)
Contact info (email or phone): 

For more information or to RSVP, contact Stacy Massey at smassey@ij.org.

Sometimes law students are told they have two options:  a miserable life earning decent money at a law firm, or a rewarding job coupled with a vow of poverty.  This isn’t true.  On October 7, Rob Johnson, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, will discuss his public-interest career and steps you can take to have a career at IJ.  The Institute for Justice, the nation’s

Public Interest/Pro Bono Board Coffee Mess

Date: 
09.30.2015
Location: 
Green Lounge

Learn more about how you can participate in student organization pro bono projects and other community service activities.  Grab your morning coffee and pastry, meet public interest faculty members, student leaders from public interest law student organizations, and the Pro Bono Board, and sign the Pro Bono Pledge.

Public Service Faculty Panel

Date: 
09.30.2015
Location: 
Room II

This panel will feature a sampling of faculty members involved in work in the public sector, including public interest work and pro bono work.  The panel will include Professor Emily Buss, Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of Law; Professor Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law and Ronald H.

1L Summer Options: Public Service and Law School Clinics

Date: 
10.15.2015
Location: 
Auditorium
Contact info (email or phone): 

career_services@law.uchicago.edu

You have many employment options for your 1L summer. Join us for the first in a two part series to learn about the application process for positions in public interest, and law school clinics.

The Office of Career Services expects all Class of 2018 students to attend this program.

A Win-Win-Win: The Trifold Impact of the Public Interest Fellowship

Author: 
Becky Beaupre Gillespie

A Law School fellowship program gives six graduates each year the funding they need to launch public interest law careers. Why it works—and why it is essential.

Carl Newman, ’12, appeared in court more than 25 times between Law School graduation and the day he was admitted to the Illinois Bar. The first time was two days into his fellowship at the Domestic Violence Legal Clinic in Chicago; he was even in court on behalf of a client the day he was sworn in.

Alison Siegler, “The Courts of Appeals’ Latest Sentencing Rebellion”

For over twenty-five years, federal courts of appeals have rebelled against every Supreme Court mandate that weakens the federal sentencing Guidelines.

For over twenty-five years, federal courts of appeals have rebelled against every Supreme Court mandate that weakens the federal sentencing Guidelines. That rebellion has intensified since the Court dealt a blow to the Guidelines a decade ago by making them advisory, rather than mandatory.

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