Legal History

Sarah Barringer Gordon, "The Spirit of the Law: Separation of Church and State from 1945-1990"

The University of Chicago Law School is proud to welcome Professor Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at Penn Law School, for the 2010 Fulton Lecture in Legal History.


68:14 minutes (62.47 MB)

Sarah Barringer Gordon, "The Spirit of the Law: Separation of Church and State from 1945-1990"

The University of Chicago Law School is proud to welcome Professor Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at Penn Law School, for the 2010 Fulton Lecture in Legal History.

Laura Weinrib

Assistant Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar

Laura Weinrib is a 2003 graduate of Harvard Law School. She completed her PhD in history at Princeton University in 2011. In 2000, she received an AB in literature and an AM in comparative literature from Harvard University. After law school, Weinrib clerked for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. From 2009 to 2010, she was a Samuel I.

Alison LaCroix Discusses States' Rights on Utah Public Radio

The Push for States' Rights
KUER, RadioWest
April 7, 2010

From health care reform opt-out to claims on federal land, the 2010 Utah legislative session got a lot of attention for bills that asserted "states' rights." But it's not just in Utah or the West - states around the country are challenging federal power on a wide variety of issues.

Faculty: 
Alison LaCroix

James Q. Whitman, "The Verdict of Battle"

In its classic form, a “decisive” pitched battle was a beautifully contained event, lasting a single day, killing only combatants, and resolving legal questions of immense significance. Yet since the mid-nineteenth century, pitched battles no longer decide wars, which now routinely degenerate into general devastation. Why did pitched battle ever work as a conflict resolution device?

James Q. Whitman, "The Verdict of Battle"

In its classic form, a “decisive” pitched battle was a beautifully contained event, lasting a single day, killing only combatants, and resolving legal questions of immense significance. Yet since the mid-nineteenth century, pitched battles no longer decide wars, which now routinely degenerate into general devastation. Why did pitched battle ever work as a conflict resolution device?


65:14 minutes (59.73 MB)

Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship

The Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History was created in 1985 through a gift made by Mr. Fulton, a member of the class of 1942, and his wife Muriel, an alumna of the college. The Fulton Lecture presents a prominent legal historian to speak at the Law School.

The Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History was created in 1985 through a gift made by Mr. Fulton, a member of the class of 1942, and his wife Muriel, an alumna of the college. The Fulton Lecture presents a prominent legal historian to speak at the Law School.

Alison LaCroix

Robert Newton Reid Professor of Law and Associate Member, Dept. of History

Alison LaCroix is Robert Newton Reid Professor of Law and Ludwig and Hilde Wolf Teaching Scholar at the Law School. She is also an associate member of the University of Chicago Department of History. LaCroix received her BA summa cum laude in history from Yale University in 1996 and her JD from Yale Law School in 1999.

Dennis J. Hutchinson

Sr. Lect. in Law and William Rainey Harper Professor in the College, Master of the New Collegiate Division, and Assoc. Dean of the College

Following his graduation summa cum laude from Bowdoin College, Dennis Hutchinson attended the Law School for one year, then spent three years at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, where he read for the BA in law. He then received an LLM from the University of Texas at Austin and successively clerked for three federal judges, including Justice Byron White and William O. Douglas (Ret.).

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