Legal History

Worth a Volume of Logic: The Study of Legal History at the Law School

Author: 
Meredith Heagney

The Law School’s legal historians, Professors Helmholz, LaCroix, and Weinrib, discuss the joys of studying legal history and its relevance to the modern study of law.

If you’ve ever walked into Professor Richard Helmholz’s office, you know about the very old books. Dozens of thick tomes, lined on shelves along their worn, hand­bound spines, cover nearly the whole east wall. Most are hundreds of years old, and in Latin.

Fulton Lecture in Legal History: Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Date: 
05.08.2014
Location: 
Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

For special assistance or needs, please contact Rebecca Klaff at 773-834-4326, or rklaff@law.uchicago.edu

Professor Brown-Nagin’s talk will examine the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women’s rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

Weinrib Wins Two Prizes From American Society for Legal History

Office of Communications
November 9, 2013

At this week's annual meeting of the American Society for Legal History, Professor Laura Weinrib of the University of Chicago Law School received two awards: the Surrency Prize and the

Faculty: 
Laura Weinrib

David Armitage, "Civil War: A Genealogy"

Civil war is like pornography--we think know it when we see it. Yet ideas of civil war have a long and contested history with multiple meanings and contested applications. This lecture offers a critical history of conceptions of civil war, with special attention to its legal definition since the nineteenth century.


79:34 minutes (72.85 MB)

2013 Fulton Lecture in Legal History: David Armitage, "Civil War: A Genealogy"

Date: 
05.09.2013
Location: 
Courtroom

Civil war is like pornography--we think know it when we see it. Yet ideas of civil war have a long and contested history with multiple meanings and contested applications. This lecture offers a critical history of conceptions of civil war, with special attention to its legal definition since the nineteenth century.

The Lawyer's Library in the Early American Republic

Author: 
Alison L. LaCroix

This essay appears in a volume titled Subversion and Sympathy: Gender, Law, and the British Novel in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Martha C. Nussbaum and Alison L. LaCroix, eds.) (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2013).

Alison LaCroix, "Sick and Tired?: The Supreme Court's New Old Federalism"

From the scores of briefs to the extended oral arguments to the widely watched announcement of the Supreme Court’s decision in June, the case of National Federation of Independent Business v.


44:10 minutes (40.45 MB)

Alison LaCroix Talks Federalism and the Supreme Court at First Monday Lunch

Meredith Heagney
Law School Office of Communications
November 2, 2012

Few legal topics are more topical than the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, which was upheld by the Supreme Court in June but continues to inspire debate leading into Election Day.

Faculty: 
Alison L. LaCroix

James Oldham, “The Popular Press and the Law in Pre-Industrial England”

The 2012 Fulton Lecture in Legal History was given on May 2, 2012 by James C. Oldham, St. Thomas More Professor of Law and Legal History at Georgetown Law.


70:04 minutes (64.15 MB)

James Oldham, “The Popular Press and the Law in Pre-Industrial England”

The 2012 Fulton Lecture in Legal History was given on May 2, 2012 by James C. Oldham, St. Thomas More Professor of Law and Legal History at Georgetown Law.

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