Legal History

Transforming Today's Supreme Court

Claire Stamler-Goody
Law School Communications
June 1, 2017

This year's Fulton Lecture examined how Supreme Court nominations in the sixties have shaped the appointments process today

The unprecedented level of media coverage and public scrutiny that surrounded Supreme Court nominations during the presidencies of Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon shaped the confirmation process and narrowed the types of candidates presidents consider, said Professor Laura Kalman when she delivered this year’s Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lecture in Legal History.

Faculty: 
Geoffrey R. Stone

Laura Kalman, "The Long Reach of the Sixties: LBJ, Nixon, and the Making of the Contemporary Supreme Court"

Laura Kalman focuses on the period between 1965 and 1971, when Presidents Johnson and Nixon launched the most ambitious effort to control the Court since Franklin Roosevelt tried to pack it with additional justices.

Embedded video: 

John Fabian Witt, "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Participating faculty: 
Tom Ginsburg
Embedded video: 

John Fabian Witt, "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

In his lecture, Professor Witt tells the story of a small but diverse group of Americans who took control of a Wall Street fortune to battle power with power, establishing a foundation with a breathtaking aim: to change the American mind.

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Fulton Lecture with John Fabian Witt: "Weapons of Truth: Money, Propaganda, and Civil Liberties in World War I America"

Date: 
04.19.2016
Location: 
Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

ewellin@uchicago.edu

A century ago, World War I set the modern First Amendment into motion.  But wartime propaganda also gave rise to a critique that has shadowed speech rights right up through Citizens United and into our own time.  For the war showed speech not only to be a form of protest, but also a form of power.

Faculty: 
Alison L. LaCroix

Maurice Fulton, '42, Friend and Generous Benefactor, 1919-2014

Is this a Record profile?: 
No

Maurice Fulton of Highland Park, IL and Boca Raton, FL, formerly of Glencoe, former president and chairman of the board of the Fantus Company, died August 31 in Highland Park, Illinois, at the age of 94.

Class year: 
1942

LaCroix Approaches NLRB v. Noel Canning Linguistically

Why the Supreme Court Should Stop Fetishizing Dictionaries and Start Caring About Words
Alison L. LaCroix and Jason Merchant
Balkanization
June 20, 2014

As the current Supreme Court Term draws to a close, the decision in one of the most closely watched cases of the year, NLRB v. Noel Canning, remains to be announced. 

The case concerns the president’s recess appointment power under Article II, sec. 2, cl. 3 of the Constitution. The Recess Appointments Clause states:

Faculty: 
Alison L. LaCroix

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Professor Brown-Nagin's talk examines the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women's rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

Embedded video: 

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Professor Brown-Nagin's talk examines the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women's rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

R.H. Helmholz, "Magna Carta: A European Perspective"

This talk was recorded on April 25, 2014, as the Law School's annual Loop Luncheon.

Participating faculty: 
R. H. Helmholz
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