Legal History

Maurice Fulton, '42, Friend and Generous Benefactor, 1919-2014

Is this a Record profile?: 
No

Maurice Fulton of Highland Park, IL and Boca Raton, FL, formerly of Glencoe, former president and chairman of the board of the Fantus Company, died August 31 in Highland Park, Illinois, at the age of 94.

Class year: 
1942

LaCroix Approaches NLRB v. Noel Canning Linguistically

Why the Supreme Court Should Stop Fetishizing Dictionaries and Start Caring About Words
Alison L. LaCroix and Jason Merchant
Balkanization
June 20, 2014

As the current Supreme Court Term draws to a close, the decision in one of the most closely watched cases of the year, NLRB v. Noel Canning, remains to be announced. 

The case concerns the president’s recess appointment power under Article II, sec. 2, cl. 3 of the Constitution. The Recess Appointments Clause states:

Faculty: 
Alison LaCroix

Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Professor Brown-Nagin's talk examines the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women's rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.

R.H. Helmholz, "Magna Carta: A European Perspective"

This talk was recorded on April 25, 2014, as the Law School's annual Loop Luncheon.

Participating faculty: 
R. H. Helmholz

Sidebar: LaCroix Helps Develop New Field

Author: 
Meredith Heagney

Professor Alison LaCroix, a legal historian, taught the Law School’s first class on law and linguistics over Winter Quarter with Jason Merchant, Professor of Linguistics and Deputy Dean for Languages and Instruction in the University’s Division of the Humanities.

Worth a Volume of Logic: The Study of Legal History at the Law School

Author: 
Meredith Heagney

The Law School’s legal historians, Professors Helmholz, LaCroix, and Weinrib, discuss the joys of studying legal history and its relevance to the modern study of law.

If you’ve ever walked into Professor Richard Helmholz’s office, you know about the very old books. Dozens of thick tomes, lined on shelves along their worn, hand­bound spines, cover nearly the whole east wall. Most are hundreds of years old, and in Latin.

Fulton Lecture in Legal History: Tomiko Brown-Nagin, "The Honor and Burden of Being First: Judge Constance Baker Motley at the Bar and on the Bench"

Date: 
05.08.2014
Location: 
Courtroom
Contact info (email or phone): 

For special assistance or needs, please contact Rebecca Klaff at 773-834-4326, or rklaff@law.uchicago.edu

Professor Brown-Nagin’s talk will examine the legacy of The Honorable Constance Baker Motley—and break new ground in the study of civil rights, women’s rights, and the legal profession. A protégée of Thurgood Marshall, Motley litigated in southern courtrooms during the 1940s and 1950s, when women lawyers scarcely appeared before the bar.