Kanter Project on Mass Incarceration

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration

Date: 
05.03.2013
Location: 
Coulter Lounge at the International House

The Kanter Project on Mass Incarceration at the University of Chicago Law School presents

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration
A Colloquium and Conversation at the University of Chicago

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 4

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 3

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 2

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.

Asylums and Prisons: Deinstitutionalization and Decarceration, Session 1

Since the early nineteenth century, carceral spaces such as asylums, prisons, and state schools have been central to U.S. governance. Yet in the twentieth century these institutions took drastically different paths, as institutions for developmental disabilities and mental health dramatically decreased and prisons became the dominant state‐run institutions.

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