Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project

Craig Futterman Talks with WGN's The Download about Youth, Police, and Reform

How Do High School Students View Their Relationship with the Police?
WGN Radio
April 13, 2016

University of Chicago law professor Craig Futterman joins Justin to talk about a new study on police accountability and the relationship between youth and police.

University of Chicago law professor Craig Futterman joins Justin to talk about a new study on police accountability and the relationship between youth and police. We also hear from a Chicago police officer who offers his take on the study.

Listen at wgnradio.com.

Faculty: 
Craig B. Futterman

Craig Futterman on New Youth/Police Report

New Report from U. of C. Focuses on Youth/Police Interactions
Sam Rappaport
Hyde Park Herald
April 8, 2016

A new report published by the University of Chicago Law School seeks to call attention to the perspectives and experiences of the young Black people most affected by urban police practices.

A new report published by the University of Chicago (U. of C.) Law School seeks to call attention to the perspectives and experiences of the young Black people most affected by urban police practices.

Faculty: 
Craig B. Futterman

Craig Futterman: 'To Truly Reform Police, Give IPRA the Boot'

To Truly Reform Police, Give IPRA the Boot
Craig Futterman and Sheila A. Bedi
Chicago Sun-Times
April 6, 2016

Ald. Leslie Hairston (5th) has announced that she is introducing an ordinance that will abolish IPRA and replace it with a truly independent and empowered citizen body to conduct high quality investigations into police misconduct that are fully transparent and accountable to the entire community. This is real reform.

The release of the video of the killing of Laquan McDonald lifted the curtain on Chicago’s code of silence and revealed an astounding lack of police accountability throughout the city.

Faculty: 
Craig B. Futterman

Proposed Chicago Ordinance Draws from Research of the Law School's Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic

Law School Communications
April 5, 2016

Drawing upon research from the University of Chicago Law School’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic, Chicago Alderman Leslie Hairston (5th) is introducing an ordinance to the Chicago City Council that calls for the replacement of the Independent Police Review Authority by a truly independent police oversight agency. The proposed ordinance abolishes IPRA and establishes, in its place, the Independent Citizen Police Monitor—a credible civilian agency to investigate police shootings, use of force, and police abuse of people in Chicago.

Drawing upon research from the University of Chicago Law School’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic, Chicago Alderman Leslie Hairston (5th) is introducing an ordinance to the Chicago City Council that calls for the replacement of the Independent Police Review Authority by a truly independent police oversight agency.

Faculty: 
Craig B. Futterman

'They Have All the Power': Youth/Police Encounters on Chicago's South Side

Drawing on our work with youth, we propose a set of policies that, taken together, have the potential to yield more equitable and constructive relationships between Black communities and police.

Author: 
Craig B. Futterman
with: 
Chaclyn Hunt, Jamie Kalven

Public conversations about urban police practices tend to exclude the perspectives and experiences of the young Black people, the citizens often most affected by those practices.

Lifting the Curtain: Futterman Reflects on the Aftermath of the Laquan McDonald Crisis—and What It Tells Us about How Change Gets Made

Becky Beaupre Gillespie
Law School Communications
March 30, 2016

Just after Thanksgiving, as Chicago was erupting in outrage over dashcam footage of a white police officer fatally shooting a black teenager, Clinical Professor Craig Futterman felt the first rumbles of a shift he’d been imagining most of his career. It was the beginning of what would become one of the busiest and most extraordinary periods of his professional life—and one that marked significant progress in Chicago’s struggle to address issues of race, justice, and policing. It would also become a lesson in how change gets made, and how the work of the Law School’s clinics can reach far beyond the lives of their clients.

Just after Thanksgiving, as Chicago was erupting in outrage over dashcam footage of a white police officer fatally shooting a black teenager, Clinical Professor Craig Futterman felt the first rumbles of a shift he’d been imagining most of his career.

Faculty: 
Craig B. Futterman
Syndicate content