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April 2017

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3 Apr 2017 - 12:32pm
3 Apr 2017 - 2:07pm
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This conference focuses on the institutional design of immigration law: how law and institutions should be designed so as to admit people who are considered desirable from the standpoint of public policy, and to screen out those who are not.

Most traditional immigration law scholarship focuses on who gets to immigrate, and how many people should be allowed into the country. Scholars have also written extensively about the history of immigration law and problems with the enforcement of immigration law. Much less work has focused on how immigration influences domestic institutions and practices and how these in turn influence the patterns of immigration.

This conference brings together a group of scholars who are interested in these new areas of immigration law scholarship. Topics include the role of employers in screening out workers who are unlawfully in the country; the role of the states in enforcing federal law; the interaction between the criminal law and the immigration system; programs for identifying potential migrants who have the most to contribute to the country; and the interaction between immigration and trade policy.

Immigration Law and Institution Design is the 2012 annual joint conference series sponsored by the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics and the University of Chicago Law Review.  "Immigration Law and Institutional Design" is organized by Eric A. Posner, University of Chicago, Adam Cox, New York University, and Richard A. Epstein, New York University, Hoover Institution, University of Chicago.

This conference is sponsored by the Institute for Law and Economics and the University of Chicago Law Review. It is open to the public and attendance is free. Please contact Marjorie Holme (mholme@uchicago.edu) for more details.

Participants include:
Kerry Abrams, University of Virginia Law School
What Makes the Family Special?

Anu Bradford, University of Chicago Law School
Dividing the Migration Surplus

Eleanor Brown, George Washington University Law School
The Blacks Who "Got Their 40 Acres": A Theory of West Indian Migrant Asset Acquisition

Adam Cox, New York University School of Law, and Tom Miles, University of Chicago Law School
Integrating Immigration and the Criminal Element

Alina Das, New York University School of Law
Immigration Detention: Information Gaps and Institutional Barriers to Reform

Ingrid Eagly, UCLA School of Law
Criminal Process and the Construction of Criminal Aliens

John Eastman, Chapman University School of Law
From Plyler to Arizona: Have the Courts Forgotten about Corfield v. Coryell?

Richard Epstein, New York University School of Law, Hoover Institution, University of Chicago Law School
Free Trade versus Free Immigration: A Comparative Analysis

Stephen Lee, University of California, Irvine School of Law
Screening for Solidarity

Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA School of Law
Designing Temporary Worker Programs

Eric Posner, University of Chicago Law School
The Institutional Structure of Immigration Law

Peter Schuck, Yale Law School
Immigrant Criminals in Overcrowded Prisons: Rethinking an Anachronistic Policy

Alan Sykes, Stanford Law School
International Cooperation in Migration: Theory and Practice

Immigration program.pdf

3 Apr 2017 - 2:08pm
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The movement to harmonize European contract law generated various proposals for uniform statutes and optional instruments, culminating by the recent Draft Common European Sales Law. This ambitious reform envisions a uniform Sales Law for Europe with strong consumer protections, enacted by every member nation. Transactors will be able to choose this law to govern their transaction in place of existing contract law.

The Chicago conference brings together a group of leading scholars from Europe and from the University of Chicago, exploring the law and economics perspectives of the proposed harmonization. Is such an optional statute a desirable regulatory tool? What economic goals might it serve? Are the protections enacted in it suitable? What can be learned from the American experience with uniform commercial laws?

The conference will be hosted by the Institute for Law and Economics at the University of Chicago Law School and will take place on Friday and Saturday, April 27-28, 2012, in Chicago. It is open to the public and attendance is free. Please contact Marjorie Holme (mholme@uchicago.edu) for more details.

The conference will be published in the Common Market Law Review (2013).

Conference Schedule

Conference Program

Thomas Ackermann, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich
Public Supply of Optional Standardized Consumer Contracts: A Rationale for the Common European Sales Law?

Douglas Baird, University of Chicago Law School
Precontractual Disclosure Duties under the Common European Sales Law

Omri Ben-Shahar, University of Chicago Law School, and Oren Bar-Gill, New York University Law School
Regulatory Techniques in Consumer Protection: A Critique of the Common European Sales Law

Lisa Bernstein, University of Chicago Law School
An (Un) Common Frame of Reference: An American Perspective on the Jurisprudence of the CESL

Fabrizio Cafaggi, European University Institute, Florence
CESL and Precontractual Liability: From a Status to a Transaction-Based Approach?

Horst Eidenmuller, University of Munich
What Can Be Wrong with an Option? The Proposal for an Optional Common European Sales Law

Richard Epstein, New York University Law School, Hoover Institution, University of Chicago Law School
Harmonization, Heterogeneity, and Regulation: Why the Common European Sales Law Should Be Scrapped

Fernando Gomez, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
Optional Law for Firms and Consumers: An Economic Analysis of Opting into the Common European Sales Law

Stefan Grundmann, Humboldt Universitat, Berlin
Costs and Benefits of an Optional European Sales Law (CESL)

William Hubbard, University of Chicago Law School
Another Look at the Eurobarometer Contract Law Survey Data

Saul Levmore, University of Chicago Law School
Harmonization, Preferences, and the Calculus of Consent in Commercial and Other Law

Chantal Mak
In Defence of CESL

Ariel Porat, University of Chicago Law School and Tel Aviv Law School
Mistake under the Common European Sales Law

Eric Posner, University of Chicago Law School
The Questionable Basis of the Common European Sales Law: The Role of an Optional Instrument in Jurisdictional Competition

Jan Smits, Maastricht University
The Common European Sales Law and Party Choice: When Will Parties Choose the Proposed CESL?

Gerhard Wagner, Universitat Bonn
Buyers' Remedies under the CESL: Rejection, Rescission, and the Seller's Right to Cure

Simon Whittaker, Oxford University
Identifying Legal Costs of the Operation of the Common European Sales Law:  Legal Framework, Scope of the Uniform Law and National Judicial Evaluations

schedule brochure1.pdf

3 Apr 2017 - 2:11pm
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Remedies for the No Read Problem in Consumer Contracting
Ian Ayres, William K. Townsend Professor of Law, Yale Law School

3 Apr 2017 - 2:14pm
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The Fable of Land Reform: Expropriation and Redistribution in Occupied Japan
J. Mark Ramseyer, Mitsubishi Professor of Japanese Legal Studies, Harvard Law School

3 Apr 2017 - 2:16pm
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Judicial Activism in State Supreme Courts: Institutional Design and Judicial Behavior

3 Apr 2017 - 2:19pm
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Do Judges Vary in Their Treatment of Race?

3 Apr 2017 - 2:22pm
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The Solicitor General and the United States Supreme Court: Executive Influence and Judicial Decisions

3 Apr 2017 - 2:45pm
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Although people sometimes violate the law, there is more legal compliance than we can explain by ordinary economic theory – that legal sanctions deter noncompliance. In some domains of international law and constitutional law, there is no credible threat of legal sanctions, yet there is compliance. In some historic examples, “courts” lacking any sanctioning power resolved disputes arising in medieval Iceland, among 18th century pirates, and among 19th century gold-rushers. Professor McAdams explains these and other historic and contemporary examples of compliance by focusing attention on law’s expressive power. First, legal expression provides a salient means of coordinating behavior. Second, law reveals information about risks and attitudes. These two expressive powers are distinct from law’s coercive power.

mcadams_cbi_1-6-15_draft2.pdf

3 Apr 2017 - 2:49pm
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Drinker Biddle

 

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3 Apr 2017 - 2:50pm
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Kelo Ten Years Later: The Impact on Eminent Domain, Property Rigths, and Homes

Lunch talk panel with Ilya Somin, George Mason University, Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi, University of Chicago Law School, and Lee Fennell, University of Chicago Law School

In 2005 the Supreme Court handed down the controversial decision of Kelo v. City of New London. Ten years later, we ask what the impact of the case has been on the real world. Our panelists address the effects of economic development and blight condemnations on the housing market as well as the state-level reform efforts prompted by the decision.

Sponsored by the Federalist Society and the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy

Lunch will be provided.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Event poster

3 Apr 2017 - 2:56pm
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A lunch talk with

Charles Witherington-Perkins, Director of Planning and Community Development, Village of Arlington Heights

and

Gail Schechter, Executive Director, Open Communities

Even while media focus turns to gentrification in our city centers, America's original open housing battles--in affluent suburbs--are far from over. Two leaders who are deeply involved in affordable housing in Chicago's wealthy North Shore will discuss the prospects for economic and racial integration in what remains the most privileged part of the metropolitan area.

Lunch will be provided

This talk will be at the Harris School in room 140C.

Sponsored by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Event poster

3 Apr 2017 - 2:57pm
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The University of Chicago Law School cordially invites you to attend the upcoming Kreisman Housing Breakfast Series event:

Rising Storm: Ways of Addressing Climate Change's Impacts on Infrastructure and Housing 

Co-sponsored by the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago
and the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics

Featuring panelists
Henry Henderson, Midwest Director, Natural Resources Defense Council
Bill Abolt, Vice President, AECOM
Omri Ben-Shahar, Leo and Eileen Herzel Professor of Law and Kearney Director of the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics

In conversation with Mark Templeton, Associate Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic

Led by University of Chicago environmental lawyer Mark Templeton, an expert panel will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different public and private approaches for addressing the impacts of climate change on infrastructure and housing.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015
8:00 a.m.   Breakfast
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.   Program

The University of Chicago Gleacher Center, Room 306
450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive
Chicago, IL 60611 

Kindly RSVP online by April 16: https://www.regonline.com/kreismanbreakfast2015. For this event there will be a registration fee of $8.00 for University of Chicago alumni; $10.00 for non-alumni. Students may attend free of charge.

 Valet parking is available free of charge near the entrance to the Gleacher Center.

This event is organized by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy at the University of Chicago Law School, which brings together the best housing research at the University of Chicago to engage the real estate, public policy, and financial communities. The Initiative is co-directed by Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law at the Law School, and Benjamin Keys, Assistant Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy. 

Event poster

3 Apr 2017 - 3:01pm
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The Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy and the Committee on Geographical Studies at the University of Chicago welcome you to join in a conversation about the unevenness of how ‘vibrancy’ is achieved and experienced across Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods.

Current regeneration efforts orient our focus away from the transformation of the physical fabric of housing alone and instead towards building ‘vibrant communities’.  However, what vibrancy means, how it might be achieved, and who is free to experience it is unclear.

To focus our conversation, we will examine aspects of the Chicago Housing Authority’s on-going ‘Plan Forward’ initiative through the voices and perspectives of academics, community activists, property developers and public housing residents.

Moderator:   Charles Barlow, Committee on Geographical Studies, University of Chicago

 Panelists:
Jared Davis and Robert Koerner, Davis Group
Brad Hunt, Roosevelt University
Jawanza B. Malone, Kenwood Oakland Community Organization
Todd Palmer, National Public Housing Museum
Francine Washington, Central Advisory Council

Lunch will be provided.

 This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Event poster

3 Apr 2017 - 3:02pm
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The Chicago Infrastructure Trust (CIT) was established in March 2012 as a mechanism to provide alternative financing options for large infrastructure projects in the Chicagoland area.

Steve Beitler, the CEO of CIT, will discuss CIT's initiatives to date, which focus on energy efficiency and/or renewable energy generation and are designed to address the effects of climate change in Chicago, using public-private partnerships as the medium.  Professor Julie Roin will provide commentary.

Sponsored by Law of the Land and the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics.

Lunch will be provided.

Event poster

3 Apr 2017 - 3:02pm
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Come get the inside scoop about applying to law school from Admissions Deans from top US law schools.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:03pm
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Come get the inside scoop about applying to law school from Admissions Deans from top US law schools.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:04pm
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Come get the inside scoop about applying to law school from Admissions Deans from top US law schools.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:07pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum DC Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:07pm
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Come get the inside scoop about applying to law school from Admissions Deans from top US law schools.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:08pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum LA Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:09pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum ATL Flyer

3 Apr 2017 - 3:10pm
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In their book The Behavior of Federal Judges, Lee Epstein, William Landes, and Richard Posner challenge the traditional legalist and realist accounts of judging by presenting a labor market theory of judicial behavior. Judges are workers whose behavior is shaped by the conditions and incentives of their employment. Epstein, Landes, and Posner develop predictions from this theory and test them empirically using novel data sets from all three levels of the federal courts – trial, appellate, and the Supreme Court. Their far-reaching examination of judges as labor-market participants includes judges’  aversion to effort, dissent  and reversal; the influence of an individual judge’s ideology and identity as well as that of colleagues; their auditioning for promotion and the norm of conformity.

 The Chicago conference on The Behavior of Federal Judges will mark the publication of this important book, and the emergence of a field of Judicial Behavior, by presenting stand-alone contributions offering a broad array of perspectives on judicial behavior. In addition to Epstein, Landes, and Posner, participants will include Stephen Choi, Joshua Fischman, Mitu Gulati, William Hubbard, Jonathan Kastellec, Alon Klement, Thomas Miles, Jeff Rachlinski, Maya Sen, Joanna Shepherd Bailey, Andrei Shleifer, Emerson Tiller, and Andrew Wistrich. The conference will take place at the University of Chicago Law School on October 4-5, 2013.  It is organized by Omri Ben-Shahar and Thomas Miles and sponsored by the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

[schedule]

Judicial Behavior Conference7.pdf

3 Apr 2017 - 3:21pm
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Product Use Information and the Limits of Voluntary Disclosure
Oren Bar-Gill, Milton Friedman Visiting Fellow; New York University

3 Apr 2017 - 3:23pm
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The University of Chicago Law School’s upcoming Manhood in American Law and Literature conference, which will take place on February 17th and 18th, 2012, brings together a number of distinguished thinkers from a variety of fields to discuss issues of sexuality and law within the context of literary works. The conference is being organized by Professors Eric Slauter, Alison LaCroix, and Martha Nussbaum, who hope it will catalyze thinking about significant issues of sexuality and the law in American society. 

The conference will include two dramatic performances by members of the faculty of the University of Chicago’s Law School. The first scene, from the Caine Mutiny Court-Martial by Herman Wouk, will feature Judge Richard Posner as Lt. Commander Queeg, Professor Jonathan Masur as Barney Greenwald, and Professor Daniel Abebe as Stephen Maryk, and Judge Diane Wood as Captain Blakeley. The second scene, from The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman, will feature Professor Martha Nussbaum as Regina Hubbard Giddens and Professor Douglas Baird as her husband Horace.  A musical interlude will be provided by Jajah Wu, Gary de Turck, and Martha Nussbaum.

Students papers will be presented on Friday morning, and guests will begin giving papers at 1 PM. The two dramatic performances will take place at 4:00 p.m. that afternoon, and they will be followed at 5:00 p.m. by a plenary session, which will feature a reading by Joyce Carol Oates and a discussion of the conference’s general theme. At 6:15 there will be a reception. On Saturday, guests will continue to give papers between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. 

Papers will be given in Room V. The dramatic performances (at 4:00 Friday) and the plenary panel (5:15 Friday) will take place in the courtroom.

Full Schedule:

Friday, February 17:
9:00: Welcoming Remarks (audio)
9:15 to 11:15: Student papers
     Chair: Emily Buss
     Speakers:
          Patrick Barry: Frederick Douglas: Law, Manhood, and Anti-Slavery (tentative)
          Hilary Leewong: Shooting Blanks: Hapa Men and Mixed Race Sex in Kip Fulbeck’s Paper
               Bullets
          Benjamin Ogles: A Strong and Beautiful Bug
          Paxton Williams: The indictment of the law and notions of masculinity in Ossie Davis’ Purlie
               Victorious
11:15 to 12:00: Fatherhood and Manhood (audio)
     Chair: Randy Berlin
     Speaker:
          Emily Buss: Fatherhood in Classic American Literature
12:00: Lunch for presenters
1:00 to 3:45: The Manly Man: Guns, Courage, Failure (audio)
     Chair: Eric Posner
     Speakers:
          Richard Posner: Manhood in Hemingway
          Deak Nabers: Law from a Gun: Nuclear Warfare, Manhood, and Post-World War II
               Constitutional Formalism
          Douglas Baird: American Stoic
          Michael Warner: Manning Up: Failure in Masculinity and Failures of Masculinity
4:00:  Dramatic scenes (with musical interlude)
5:15 to 6:30: Oates plenary reading and plenary panel
     Plenary panel:
          Alison LaCroix, Martha Nussbaum, Joyce Carol Oates, Richard Posner, Diane Wood
6:30: Reception

 

Saturday, February 18
9:15: Breakfast for presenters
9:45 to 11:30 Unmanly Men (audio)
     Chair: Todd Henderson
     Speakers:
          David Halperin: Bitch Baskets: Sex Roles and Gay Male Femininity
          Martha Nussbaum: Jewish Men, Jewish Lawyers: Roth’s Eli, the Fanatic and the Question of
               Jewish Masculinity in American Law
          Saul Levmore: Informants, Barn Burning, and the Public Interest: Loyalty in Literature, Law, and
               Manly Endeavors
11:30 Lunch for presenters
1:15 to 3:30: Manhood, Race, Empathy (audio)
     Chair: Laura Weinrib
     Speakers:
          Glenda Carpio: Obama and the Staging of Scottsboro Boys
          Richard McAdams: Empathy and Masculinity in To Kill a Mockingbird
          Brook Thomas: Of Mules and Men, Schools and Suffrage
3:45 to 6:00: Manhood, Rights, and Responsibilities (audio)
     Chair: Jane Dailey
     Speakers:
          Robin West: The Great Gatsby and the Death of Torts
          Colin Dayan: Like a Dog: Animal Law, Human Cruelty, and the Limits of Care
          Eric Slauter: Conceptions of the Rights of Man

 

Presenters should speak for no more than thirty minutes, allowing ample time for discussion.

The attendees and paper topics are as follows:

  • Douglas Baird, The Law School, University of Chicago: American Stoic
  • Emily Buss, The Law School, University of Chicago: Fatherhood in Classic American Literature (Tentative)
  • Glenda Carpio, Department of African-American Studies, Harvard University: Obama and the Staging of Scottsboro Boys
  • Colin Dayan, Department of English, Vanderbilt University: Like a Dog: Animal Law, Human Cruelty, and the Limits of Care 
  • David Halperin, Department of English, University of Michigan: Bitch Baskets: Sex Roles and Gay Male Femininity
  • Saul Levmore, The Law School, University of Chicago: Informants, Barn Burning, and the Public Interest: Disloyalty in Literature and Law
  • Richard McAdams, The Law School, University of Chicago: Empathy and Masculinity in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Deak Nabers, Department of English, Brown University: Law from a Gun: Nuclear Warfare, Manhood, and Post-World War II Constitutional Formalism
  • Martha Nussbaum, The Law School and Department of Philosophy, University of Chicago: 
    Jewish Men, Jewish Lawyers: Roth’s Eli, the Fanatic and the Question of Jewish Masculinity in American Law
  • Richard Posner, US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and The Law School, University of Chicago: Manhood in Hemingway
  • Eric Slauter, Department of English, University of Chicago: Conceptions of the Rights of Man
  • Brook Thomas, Department of English, University of California at Irvine: Of Mules and Men, Schools and Suffrage
  • Michael Warner, Department of English, Yale University: Manning Up: Failure in Masculinity and Failures of Masculinity
  • Robin West, Georgetown University Law Center, Georgetown University: The Great Gatsby and the Death of Torts

We hope the conference will be stimulating, productive, and enjoyable.

Please note, papers are passworded. (The handouts are not passworded.) If you have an academic interest in one or more of the papers, please email cnskene@uchicago.edu. Hard copies of all papers will be available at the conference.

3 Apr 2017 - 3:25pm
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Kevin E. Davis, Beller Family Professor of Business Law, New York University School of Law
"The Concept of Legal Uncertainty: Definition and Measurement"

3 Apr 2017 - 3:27pm
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The U.S. Crime Puzzle: A Comparative Large-N Perspective on U.S. Crime and Punishment
Holger Spamann, Harvard Law School and Becker Friedman Institute Fellow

3 Apr 2017 - 3:28pm
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Featuring a conversation with

  • Amir Sufi, Chicago Board of Trade Professor of Finance at the Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Benjamin Keys, Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy

Moderated by

  • Alby Gallun, Editor and Senior Real Estate Reporter at Crain's Chicago Business

Please join us as Chicago faculty Amir Sufi and Benjamin Keys address their empirical results on how the housing boom and foreclosure crisis happened, and how we can ensure they will not happen again. With focus on Chicago's housing market, Professor Sufi will discuss the lessons of the housing boom and bust, including the dangers of subsidizing household debt. Professor Keys uses his analysis of housing price data to argue that rather than being the cause of the run-up in home prices, non-traditional financing arrangements were used by consumers to afford housing that was already rapidly becoming more expensive. 

Kindly RSVP online by May 1 at https://www.regonline.com/kreismanhousingbreakfast. There will be a registration fee of $10.00 for this event.'

Event invitation

3 Apr 2017 - 3:42pm
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Windsor and the (Non)-Recognition of Non-Marital Families

3 Apr 2017 - 3:44pm
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Law of the Land and the Environmental Law Society present a lunch panel discussing the growth of urban, alternative energy generation projects nationwide and locally in Chicago.  Focusing on Chicago-based projects including ComEd's City Solar project, a 10MW solar installation on a 41-acre brownfield in West Pullman, the panel will examine the particular legal obstacles for urban, alternative energy generation initiatives and the outlook for urban, alternative energy generation in the future.  

Panelists include Tom O'Neill, General Counsel and SVP of Regulatory and Energy Policy at Exelon and Becky Stanfield, Deputy Director for Policy for the Midwest Region of the National Resources Defense Council.  The panel will be moderated by Mark Templeton, Director of the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic.  Chipotle will be provided.

energy_panel_flyer.docx

3 Apr 2017 - 3:45pm
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Alon Klement, Radzyner School of Law, Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya
Budget-Constrained Injurers and the Law of Torts

3 Apr 2017 - 3:58pm
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The Supreme Court, the Media, and Public Opinion: Comparing Experimental and Observational Methods

3 Apr 2017 - 4:00pm
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Transparency and Compliance: The Costa Rican Supreme Court's Monitoring System

3 Apr 2017 - 4:17pm
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Days after the inauguration, the Trump administration announced that American aid money would stop flowing to foreign nonprofits working on abortion. This action illustrates America's long-standing moral and legal tensions related to sex. Throughout American history, conflicts over such issues as the legal regulation of contraception, abortion, homosexuality, and pornography have divided our nation and led to fundamental debates about the meaning of our Constitution. How did sex become so intertwined with religion and law when the Founding Fathers embraced Enlightenment attitudes grounded in reason, individual freedom, the pursuit of happiness, and the separation of church and state? What can the epic story of sex and the Constitution teach us about how to navigate these controversial issues both in our own nation and in our approach to such questions globally?

Geoffrey R. Stone’s new book, Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America’s Origins to the 21st Century, will be available for purchase and signing from the Book Cellar after the program.

Details and registration

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4 Apr 2017 - 10:48am
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A central problem facing legal systems is that often one party has private information. Mechanism design provides a set of tools from economics that may allow legal systems to make optimal decisions in this context. Conversely, the economics of mechanism design often needs particular legal tools to be implemented, so the study of legal systems may help inform the design of appropriate revelation mechanisms. This conference will bring together economists and lawyers to consider the interaction of legal systems and mechanisms design to cause the revelation of hidden information, exploring topics such as corporate law voting systems, the design of property rights, tax compliance, and settlements of lawsuits.

Organized by David Weisbach, Richard Epstein, and E. Glen Weyl

Sponsored by the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics and the University of Chicago Law Review

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Program

4 Apr 2017 - 10:50am
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Does economic analysis have a role to play in scholarship on international law? For quite a long time, the answer seemed to be “no,” but over the last decade, economic analysis of international law has gained traction in law schools. This conference, which celebrates the publication of Economic Foundations of International law by Eric Posner and Alan Sykes, provides an opportunity to debate the relationship between economic analysis and international law. A distinguished group of scholars will present papers on treaties, the law of war, human rights, international organizations, and related topics.

This conference is organized by the Chicago Journal of International Law and Omri Ben-Shahar and sponsored by the journal and by the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Conference Schedule

4 Apr 2017 - 10:52am
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More Manipulation, Less Risk Taking?
Sharon Hannes, Professor of Law, Tel-Aviv University

4 Apr 2017 - 10:54am
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"Preference Heterogeneity of the Judiciary and the Composition of Political Jurisdictions"

4 Apr 2017 - 10:55am
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"Docket Control at the Supreme Court of Canada: What's Behind the Screen?"

5
5 Apr 2017 - 12:12pm
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Bonus Law and Economics lunchtime workshop. Prasad Krishnamurthy, UC Berkely Law School, will present "Affirmative Action and Stigma in Higher Eduction Admissions."

5 Apr 2017 - 12:13pm
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Come and meet the Admissions Deans from the leading law schools in the United States, including the University of Chicago Law School.  Space will be limited so be sure to register online and pre-registration is required.  You can register for the event by clicking here.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

5 Apr 2017 - 12:15pm
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Come and meet the Admissions Deans from the leading law schools in the United States, including the University of Chicago Law School.  Space will be limited so be sure to register online and pre-registration is required.  You can register for the event by clicking here.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

5 Apr 2017 - 12:15pm
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Come and meet the Admissions Deans from the leading law schools in the United States, including the University of Chicago Law School.  Space will be limited so be sure to register online and pre-registration is required.  You can register for the event by clicking here.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

5 Apr 2017 - 12:16pm
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Come and meet the Admissions Deans from the leading law schools in the United States, including the University of Chicago Law School.  Space will be limited so be sure to register online and pre-registration is required.  You can register for the event by clicking here.

L.A.W.S. Flyer

5 Apr 2017 - 12:22pm
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Balancing Act
Urban Development and Gentrification's Impact on Low Income Housing

The Public Interest Law Society, Law of the Land, and the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy welcome you to join in a discussion on urban redevelopment, the gentrification that it creates, and the impacts of low-income housing.

As we root for the revitalization of nearby neighborhoods, we should think critically about the scope of development and the impact on current residents. Competing with this concern is an apprehension about potentially suffocating a budding economy.

To focus our conversation, we will evaluate a specific ordinance, Chicago's Affordable Requirements, through anthropological, legal, and economic lenses. (http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dcd/supp_info/affordable_housingrequirementsordinance.html)  

Moderator:
Lee Fennell, University of Chicago Law School

Panelists:
Jesse Mumm, Loyola University Chicago
Jeff Leslie, University of Chicago Law School
Adam Gross, Director of Affordable Housing at BPI
Ameya Pawar, Alderman, Chicago’s 47th Ward

Sponsored by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy

Lunch will be provided

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Event poster

5 Apr 2017 - 12:23pm
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OUTlaw will be hosting former U.S. Senator Al Simpson of Wyoming. Senator Simpson will talk about LGBT rights in relation to the Republican Party and how debt is affecting younger generations. 

 

Lunch will be provided. This event is free and open to the public.

2014-11-122009-57-44-1.pdf

5 Apr 2017 - 12:28pm
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Panel discussion with John Relman of Relman, Dane & Colfax PLLC, Prof. Jeff Leslie, and Prof. Lee Fennell. The conversation will focus on the pending Supreme Court case, Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., regarding the disparate impact cause of action under the Fair Housing Act.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

Relman's PowerPoint presentation

5 Apr 2017 - 12:31pm
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Paper:  “Conferring Dignity: The Metamorphosis of the Legal Homosexual,” commentator Martha Nussbaum

5 Apr 2017 - 12:34pm
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Paper: "Before Marriage: The Unexplored History of Nonmarital Recognition and Its Relationship to Marriage," commentator: Andrew Koppelman, Northwestern Law

5 Apr 2017 - 12:36pm
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Paper: “Deprivative Recognition,” commentator TBA

5 Apr 2017 - 12:40pm
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Due to weather issues, this workshop has been rescheduled to Friday, January 10th. 

Multi-Stage Contracting in Complex Transactions
Albert Choi, University of Virginia School of Law

Professor Choi will be visiting at Chicago Thursday, January 9th and Friday, January 10th.  He will be in room 602. 

5 Apr 2017 - 12:41pm
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Title: The Death of Caveat Emptor

Gerrit DeGeest, Washington University School of Law

Office 602

5 Apr 2017 - 12:47pm
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THE LAW AND ECONOMICS OF CONSUMER PROTECTION IN CHINA
中国消费者保护中的法律经济学

Sponsored in partnership by
University of Chicago Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics
Zhejiang University Center for Law and Economics
University of Chicago Center in Beijing

主办方
芝加哥大学科斯·桑德尔法律经济学研究所
浙江大学法律与经济研究中心
芝加哥大学北京中心

Beijing, China
中国北京

The University of Chicago Beijing Center
芝加哥大学北京中心:北京市海淀区中关村大街59A号文化大厦20层

June 18-19, 2014
(2014年6月18-19日)

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE 会议介绍
As consumer markets develop and grow in China, “consumer protection” has become one of the major regulatory challenges of the time. Can consumers expect the products and services they buy, and the investments they make, to be trustworthy and safe? What can the law do to safeguard the experience of consumers? How would markets react to legal intervention? Utilizing the tools of “Law and Economics,” experts from Chinese Universities and from the University of Chicago offer innovative ideas for the design of consumer protection law. The conference is a collaborative effort of Zhejiang University Center for Law and Economics and the University of Chicago. It will be published in a special issue of the journal “Law and Social Science.”

随着中国消费市场的成长与发展,消费者保护问题已成为这一时代监管制度中最具挑战性的问题。消费者是否能够确保他们购买并为之进行投资的产品和服务符合预期并足够安全?法律如何保护消费者?对于政府干预,市场将如何回应?来自中国和芝加哥大学法学院的学者们将运用法律经济学的工具为消费者保护的法律制度建构贡献新的观点和视角。此次会议是浙江大学法律经济研究中心与芝加哥大学合作的成果。会议论文将刊载于《法律和社会科学》即将出版的特辑中。

Conference Program Booklet

5 Apr 2017 - 1:24pm
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Does the Endowment Effect Justify Legal Interventions?: The Debiasing Effect of Voting and Agency Institutions 

Jennifer Arlen, New York University School of Law

Office 610

5 Apr 2017 - 1:46pm
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"Shareholder Derivative Litigation and the Preclusion Problem"
George Geis, University of Virginia School of Law

5 Apr 2017 - 2:39pm
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CANCELLED DUE TO THE CLOSURES AT O'HARE AND MIDWAY AIRPORTS TODAY.

 

M&A Negotiations and Lawyer Expertise
Ulrike Malmendier, University of California Berkely, Department of Economics, and Becker-Friedman Institute Fellow

5 Apr 2017 - 2:40pm
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The University of Chicago Law School cordially invites you to attend the upcoming Kreisman Housing Breakfast Series event:

Environment, Development, and Community: The Case of Pilsen

Featuring panelists:

Lisa Alexander, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Law School 
Nelson Soza
, Executive Director, Pilsen Alliance
Nick Yassan, Principal at Rany Management LLC
Jeffrey C. Rappin, JD '66, Chairman, Evergreen Real Estate Services, L.L.C.

Friday, October 23, 2015
8:00 a.m. Breakfast
8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Program

The University of Chicago Gleacher Center, Room 304
450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive
Chicago, IL 60611 

Join us as our panelists discuss changes in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago as a springboard for examining interactions between economic development, environmental issues, and the concerns of neighborhood residents in areas experiencing redevelopment and gentrification. Researchers, developers, community leaders, and those who have an interest in Chicago's changing neighborhoods are encouraged to join this important and timely conversation.

Kindly RSVP online by October 19 here. For this event there will be a registration fee of $10.00. Current University of Chicago students and faculty may attend at no charge.

Complimentary parking will be available. 

This event is organized by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy at the University of Chicago Law School, which brings together the best housing research at the University of Chicago to engage the real estate, public policy, and financial communities. The Initiative is co-directed by Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law at the Law School, and Benjamin Keys, Assistant Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy.

Event poster

5 Apr 2017 - 2:41pm
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Does executive clemency have the power to drive criminal justice reform?  Please join the Exoneration Project for a conversation on this topic with former Illinois Governor Patrick Quinn, Tyrone Hood, and Karl Leonard '09.  Tara Thompson of the Exoneration Project will moderate.

Tyrone Hood was convicted of the 1993 murder of Marshall Morgan, Jr., a local college basketball star whose body was found in an abandoned car on the South Side of Chicago.  Years after his conviction, attorneys (including the Exoneration Project and Karl Leonard '09 and his firm Winston & Strawn) uncovered new evidence that pointing to Mr. Hood's innocence.  This evidence also pointed to the guilt of Marshall Morgan Jr.'s father, Marshall Morgan Sr., who had taken out a life insurance policy on his estranged son and benefitted financially from his death. Morgan Sr. was later convicted of the murder of his girlfriend, whose body was also found in an abandoned car.

In January of 2015, Governor Quinn granted Mr. Hood's request for clemency and commuted his sentence.  Weeks later, after initially refusing to grant Mr. Hood relief, the Office of the Cook County State's Attorney asked the court to vacate Mr. Hood's conviction.

Mr. Hood's case is just one recent example of the executive branch playing a greater role, through the use of executive clemency, in driving criminal justice reform at the state and federal level.  This panel will discuss clemency as a tool in individual cases and as a way of the executive branch setting the agenda for reform.  Lunch will be served.  Seating is limited.

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5 Apr 2017 - 2:42pm
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Mr. Breymaier, a fair housing advocate and social justice promoter in the
Chicagoland area, will talk about the principal trends in housing policy, and
about the effect that innovative and well-designed housing policies can have on
development. It will be a great opportunity for those interested in this topic.

Information regarding internship positions will be given, and box lunch provided.

Please RSVP:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1cWx3SsOVfl6k5RA9-JGf9_gYR3o5cLgBTl1erMkz8N0/viewform?c=0&w=1

lunch_and_learn-rob_breymaier.pdf

5 Apr 2017 - 2:43pm
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Lunch-time discussion about the promises and possible perils of water markets. Come out and learn about water sustainability and whether the problem of water scarcity can be solved through markets for water. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Box lunch will be served.

markets_for_water_talk_2.pdf

5 Apr 2017 - 2:47pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 2:49pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 2:51pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 2:51pm
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The University of Chicago Law Students for Reproductive Justice, the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and MEChA de UChicago among others will screen and discuss the film No Más Bebés on Monday, May 2 at International House. The screening will be followed by a discussion with producer Professor Virginia Espino and featured plaintiff Consuelo Hermosillo. Ms. Espino will discuss her work researching the narrative portrayed in the documentary and bringing it to public attention in partnership with Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña. Ms. Hermosillo will speak to the transformative power of sharing her navigation through trauma, shame, and healing in pursuit of reproductive justice. Dinner will be served.

A group from the law school will leave together from the VCA Desk at 5:30 p.m.

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5 Apr 2017 - 2:52pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited and subject to registration. For special assistance  or for other questions about the event, please contact Ms. Curtrice Scott at curtrice@uchicago.edu.

 

The symposium will bring together academics specializing in a variety of legal subjects to develop methodologies and best practices to guide legal research. This discussion will first consider whether legal scholarship has sufficiently rigorous standards for academic researchers to support claims about changes in legal doctrine. Given the strong case for the argument that legal scholarship lacks such rigorous standards, Symposium participants will also debate the proper methodological principles that should inform how scholars support arguments about constitutions, statutes, court decisions, and administrative regulations. This debate will aim to incorporate methodological insights from a variety of social sciences and to reach consensus with regard to the best practices for academic legal research, writing, and editing.

Confirmed participants include:

William Baude, University of Chicago Law School,
Adam Chilton, University of Chicago Law School
Anup Malani, University of Chicago Law School
Curtis Bradley, Duke University School of Law
Melissa Carlson, UC Berkeley School of Law
Katerina Linos, UC Berkeley
Frank Easterbrook, University of Chicago Law School
Richard Epstein, University of Chicago Law School
Richard Fallon, Jr., Harvard Law School
Nicholas Stephanopoulos, University of Chicago Law School
Abbe Gluck, Yale Law School
Richard Posner, University of Chicago Law School
Frederick Schauer, University of Virginia School of Law
Barbara Spellman, University of Virginia School of Law
Lawrence Solum, Georgetown University Law Center
Cass Sunstein, Harvard Law School
Adrian Vermeule, Harvard Law School
Omri Ben-Shahar, University of Chicago Law School,
Florencia Marotta-Wurgler
, New York University School of Law

______________________________________________________

Organized by: Anup Malani, William Baude, Adam
Chilton, and The University of Chicago Law Review ______________________________________________________

Friday, May 6, 2016

8:30–9:00 a.m.                     Continental Breakfast
9:00–9:05 a.m.                     Welcome: Tom Miles & Manuel Valle

Panel I

9:05–9:45 a.m.
Will Baude, Adam Chilton, & Anup Malani (University of Chicago Law School)
Making Doctrinal Work More Rigorous: Lessons from Systematic Reviews

9:45–10:25 a.m.
Katerina Linos & Melissa Carlson (Berkeley School of Law)
Qualitative Methods for Law Review Writing

10:25–11:05 a.m.
Omri Ben-Shahar (University of Chicago Law School) & Florencia Marotta-Wurgler (NYU School of Law), Searching for the Common Law: An Empirical Approach

11:05–11:20 a.m. -- Break

Panel II

11:20–12:00 p.m.
Abbe Gluck (Yale Law School) 
The CBO Canon (Faint-Hearted Formalism and Why Courts Should Learn About How Congress Actually Works)

12:00–12:40 p.m.
Fred Schauer & Barbara Spellman (University of Virginia School of Law)
Analogy, Expertise, and Experience

12:40–1:20 p.m.
Frank Easterbrook (United States Court of Appeals & University of Chicago Law School)
The Absence of Method in Statutory Interpretation                                            

1:20–2:20 p.m. -- Lunch

Panel III 

2:20–3:00 p.m.
Richard Fallon (Harvard Law School)
Arguing in Good Faith about the Constitution: Ideology, Methodology, and Reflective Equilibrium

3:00–3:40 p.m.
Cass Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule (Harvard Law School)
The Unbearable Rightness of Auer

3:40–4:20 p.m.
Richard Epstein (NYU Law School, Hoover Institution, & Chicago Law School)
Concepts Before Precepts: The Central Place of Doctrine in Legal Scholarship         

Saturday, May 7, 2016

8:30–9:00 a.m -- Continental Breakfast

Panel IV

9:00–9:40 a.m.
Lawrence Solum (Georgetown University Law Center)
Originalist Methodology

9:40–10:20 a.m.
Curtis Bradley (Duke Law School)
Doing Gloss

10:20–10:35 a.m. -- Break

Panel V

10:35–11:15 a.m.
Nick Stephanopolous (University of Chicago Law School)
The Concepts of Law

11:15–11:55 a.m.
Richard Posner (United States Court of Appeals & University of Chicago Law School)
What Judges Need in the Way of Legal Research

12:00–1:00 p.m -- Lunch

 

2016_law_review_symposium-schedule-final.pdf

5 Apr 2017 - 2:57pm
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Friday, June 3               

8:00 - 8:30am – Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:35am  – Welcome from Dean Daniel Diermeier, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

8:45 - 10:15am    Panel One:  Housing and Land Use Controls

Moderator: Paul Shadle (DLA Piper)

William Fischel (Dartmouth),  The Rise of the Homevoters: How OPEC and Earth Day
Created Growth-Control Zoning that Derailed the Growth Machine

Discussant:  Vicki Been (NYC Housing Preservation and Development)

David Schleicher (Yale), How Land Use Law Impedes Transportation Innovation

Discussant:  Daniel Kay Hertz (City Observatory)

10:15 - 10:30  Break

10:30 - 12:00pm  Panel Two:  Community Change and Affordability 

Moderator:  Daniel Biss (Illinois State Senate) 

Georgette Chapman Phillips (Lehigh), Losing My Religion: Church Condo Conversions and Neighborhood Change

Discussant:  Nicole Garnett (Notre Dame)

Richard Epstein (NYU), The Unassailable Case Against Affordable Housing Programs

Discussant:  Nestor Davidson (Fordham)

 12:15 - 1:15pm  Lunch Presentation 

Atif Mian (Princeton) and Amir Sufi (Chicago) Household Debt and Defaults from 2000 to 2010: The Credit Supply View

1:30 - 3:00pm  Panel Three:  History and Home 

Moderator: Jeff Leslie (Chicago)

Ingrid Gould Ellen (NYU) & Brian McCabe (Georgetown), Balancing the Costs and Benefits of Historic Preservation

Discussant:  John Mangin (NYC Dept. of City Planning) 

Lior Strahilevitz (Chicago), Historic Preservation and Its Even Less Authentic Alternative 

Discussant:  Eduardo Peñalver (Cornell) 

3:00 - 3:15pm  Break

3:15 - 4:45pm  Panel Four:  Housing and Savings 

Moderator: Geoff Smith (Institute for Housing Studies, DePaul)

Christopher Mayer (Columbia), Housing and Retirement

Discussant:  Luigi Zingales (Chicago)

Stephanie Stern (Chicago-Kent),  Behavioral Leasing: Lease-Based Housing Alternatives for Renters

Discussant: Damon Jones (Chicago) 

Saturday, June 4

8:00 - 8:30am  – Continental Breakfast 

8:35am – Welcome from Dean Thomas Miles, University of Chicago Law School 

8:45 - 10:15am  Panel Five:  Neighborhoods and Opportunities 

Moderator:  Janet Smith (UIC)

Matthew Desmond (Harvard), How Housing Dynamics Shape Neighborhood Perceptions

Discussant:  Kate Cagney (Chicago)

Ian Ayres (Yale), Gary Klein (Massachusetts AG’s Office), & Jeff West (Precision Economics), The Rise and (Potential) Fall of Disparate Impact Lending Litigation

Discussant:  William Hubbard (Chicago) 

10:15 - 10:30am  Break

10:30 - 12:00pm  Panel Six:  The Future of Housing Finance 

Moderator: David Dana (Northwestern)

Patricia McCoy (Boston College) & Susan Wachter (Penn), Mortgage Put-backs, Cyclicality, and Access To Credit  

Discussant: Karen Pence (Federal Reserve Board)

Raphael Bostic (USC) & Anthony Orlando (USC),  When the Invisible Hand Isn't a Firm Hand: Disciplining Markets That Won't Discipline Themselves

Discussant: Brian Brooks (Fannie Mae)

Register

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5 Apr 2017 - 3:01pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 3:15pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 3:21pm
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The National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) will be held on Thursday and Friday, June 23-24, 2016, at The University of Chicago Law School.

This is the seventh annual meeting of the NBLSC, a conference that annually draws legal scholars from across the United States and around the world.  We welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Junior scholars and those considering entering the legal academy are especially encouraged to participate.

Conference Schedule

Thursday, June 23rd

8:00-8:45 Registration & Breakfast (Classroom Corridor)
8:45-9:00

Opening Remarks (Room III)
Dean Thomas J. Miles (The University of Chicago Law School)

9:00-10:00 Keynote Address (Room III)
Steven L. Schwarcz (Duke Law School)
10:00-10:15 Break
10:15-12:15

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I) 

Business Bankruptcy

Moderator and Discussant:  Michelle M. Harner (University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law)

  • Douglas G. Baird (The University of Chicago Law School), Bankruptcy's Quiet Revolution
  • Shlomit Azgad-Trome (UC Berkeley School of Law), Too Important to Fail: Bankruptcy versus Bailout of Socially-Important Non-Financial Institutions
  • Anthony J. Casey (The University of Chicago Law School), Bankruptcy on the Side
  • Laura Napoli Coordes (Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law),Gatekeepers Gone Wrong:  Reforming the Chapter 9 Eligibility Rules
  • Jared A. Ellias (University of California Hastings College of the Law), What Drives Bankruptcy Forum Shopping? Evidence from Market Data

Panel B (Room IV)

Business Entities and Social Responsibility

Moderator and Discussant:  Felix B. Chang (University of Cincinnati College of Law)

  • Matthew T. Bodie (Saint Louis University School of Law) Faith and the Firm
  • Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law), The Theoretical Foundations of Corporate Social Responsibility 
  • Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law), Corporate Purpose and Litigation Risk in Publicly Held U.S. For-Profit Benefit Corporations 
  • Alicia Plerhoples (Georgetown University Law Center), Rejecting Charity

Panel C (Room V) 

Mergers and Acquisitions

Moderator and Discussant:  Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

  • Afra Afsharipour (UC Davis School of Law) Legal Transplants in the Law of the Deal: M&A Agreements in India
  • Robert Anderson (Pepperdine University School of Law) & Jeffrey Manns (George Washington University Law School), The Inefficient Evolution of Merger Agreements
  • Cathy Hwang (Stanford Law School), Preliminary Paper in Deal Design
  • Jay B Kesten (Florida State University College of Law), Pathologies of the Modern Appraisal Remedy
  • Charles  Korsmo (Case Western Reserve University School of Law) & Minor Myers (Brooklyn Law School), Interest in Appraisal
12:15-1:00

Lunch (South Green Lounge)

1:00-2:45

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I) 

Lending Regulation

Moderator and Discussant:  David Epstein (University of Richmond School of Law)

  • Pamela Foohey (Indiana University Maurer School of Law), The Expressive Power of Bankruptcy
  • David Min (UC Irvine School of Law), Housing Finance Reform and the Safe Asset Supply
  • Paolo Saguato (London School of Economics), The Liquidity Dilemma and the Repo Market: A Two-Step Policy Option to Address the Regulatory Void
  • Yueh-Ping (Alex) Yang (Harvard Law School), Government Ownership of Banks in the U.S.: A Curse or a Blessing?

Panel B (Room IV)

Investment Fund Regulation

Moderator and Discussant:  Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)

  • William A. Birdthistle (Chicago-Kent College of Law), Empire of the Fund: Mutual Funds, 401(k)s & the Way We Save Now 
  • Sung Eun (Summer) Kim (University of California, Irvine, School of Law), Attractive Nuisances in Finance 
  • Anita K. Krug (University of Washington School of Law), Investor Democracy

Panel C (Room V)

Business Entities and Political Rights

Moderator and Discussant:  Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)

  • Vince Buccola (The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania), States’ Rights against Corporate Rights 
  • Sarah C. Haan (University of Idaho College of Law), The Shareholder Proposal Settlement and the Private Ordering of Public Elections
  • Joseph K. Leahy (South Texas College of Law), Is Management’s Decision to Cause the Corporation to Make a Political Contribution a “Business Judgment”?
  • Elizabeth Pollman (Loyola Law School, Los Angeles), Regulatory Entrepreneurship

Panel D (Room D) 

The Intersection of Business and Criminal Law

Moderator and Discussant:  Dorothy Shapiro (The University of Chicago Law School)

  • Todd Haugh (Indiana University Kelley School of Business), The Criminalization of Compliance
  • Lauren A. Newell (Ohio Northern University Pettit College of Law), Up in Smoke? Unintended Consequences of Retail Marijuana Laws for Partnerships
  • W. Robert Thomas (University of Michigan), The Ability and Responsibility of Corporate Law to Improve Criminal Punishment
2:45-3:00 Break
3:00-4:45

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I) 

Financial Market Intermediaries

Moderator and Discussant:  Tom C.W. Lin (Temple University Beasley School of Law)

  • Benjamin P. Edwards (Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law), Conflicts & Capital Allocation 
  • Gina-Gail S. Fletcher (Indiana University Maurer School of Law),            Financial Data Intermediaries
  • Veronica Root (Notre Dame Law School), Monitors as Data Brokers
  • Paolo Saguato (London School of Economics), The Organization and Governance of Clearinghouses: Mutual Enterprises or For-profit Corporations

Panel B (Room IV) 

Agency Costs and Fiduciary Duties

Moderator and Discussant:  René Reich-Graefe (Western New England University School of Law)

  • Matthew T. Bodie (Saint Louis University School of Law),  Employment as Fiduciary Relationship 
  • Yaron Nili (Harvard Law School) & Kobi Kastiel (Harvard Law School), “Captured Boards”: The Rise of “Super Directors” and the Case for a Board Suite
  • Justin Sevier (Florida State University College of Law), Who Cares About Agency Costs in Executive Compensation?
  • Gregory H. Shill (Harvard Law School), Activist Loyalties

Panel C (Room V) 

Securities Regulation and Disclosure Under the 1933 Act

Moderator and Discussant:  Donna M. Nagy (Indiana University Maurer School of Law)

  • Brent J. Horton (Fordham University Gabelli School of Business), What Did Prospectuses Look Like Before 1933?  A Review of Pre-Securities Act Offerings
  • Neal Newman (Texas A&M University School of Law), Regulation A+ – New and Improved After the J.O.B.S. Act or a Failed Revival?
  • Hillary A. Sale (Washington University School of Law), “We Believe”: Omnicare, Legal Risk Disclosure and Corporate Governance
4:45-5:00 Break
5:00-6:45

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I) 

Business Forms and Their Regulation

Moderator and Discussant:  Kelli Alces Williams (Florida State University College of Law)

  • Gechun Lin (Washington University in St. Louis, School of Law), Regulating Business Trusts in China
  • Mohsen Manesh (University of Oregon School of Law) Equity in LLC Law?
  • Peter Molk (Willamette University College of Law), Contracting Around LLC Default Rules

Panel B (Room IV) 

Understanding Shareholders

Moderator and Discussant:  William A. Birdthistle (Chicago-Kent College of Law),

  • Shlomit Azgad-Trome (UC Berkeley School of Law), Corporations and the 99%: Team Production Revisited
  • Kobi Kastiel (Harvard Law School) & Yaron Nili (Harvard Law School), In Search of the ‘Absent’ Shareholders: A New Solution to Retail Investors’ Apathy
  • Benjamin Means (University of South Carolina School of Law), Entrepreneurial Action in Family Controlled Companies
  • Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law), The Stockholder Monitor: Plaintiff Stockholders vs. Activist Stockholders

Panel C (Room V)

Securities Litigation

Moderator and Discussant:  Hillary A. Sale (Washington University School of Law)

  • Yuliya Guseva (Rutgers School of Law-Newark), Extraterritoriality Redux: Public Enforcement and Litigation Five Years After Morrison v. NAB
  • Adam C. Pritchard (University of Michigan Law School), Piling On? An Empirical Study of Parallel Derivative Suits
  • Margaret V. Sachs (University of Georgia School of Law), Superstatute Theory and Federal Securities Law: Towards A New Understanding of Morrison v. National Australia Bank, Ltd. 
  • James C. Spindler (University of Texas School of Law), We Have a Consensus on Fraud on the Market – And It’s Wrong

Panel D (Room D)

Antitrust and Regulating Anticompetitive Behavior

Moderator and Discussant:  Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)

  • Felix B. Chang (University of Cincinnati College of Law), Second-Generation Monopolization: Parallel Exclusion in Derivatives Markets
  • Gregory Day (Oklahoma State University Spears School of Business), Efficient Piracy
  • Vera Korzun (Fordham Law School), Arbitrating Antitrust Claims: From Suspicion to Trust
  • Samuel N. Weinstein (U.C. Berkeley School of Law), Rigged Results? Solving the Antitrust Puzzle of Search-Engine Keyword Bid-Rigging Agreements
6:45-7:45 Reception (North Green Lounge)

 

Friday, June 24th

7:45-8:45 Breakfast (Classroom Corridor)
8:45-9:45

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I)

Business Law and Technology

Moderator and Discussant:  Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)

  • Carla L. Reyes (Stetson University College of Law  ), Disruptive Regulation: The Blockchain and Standard Setting Using an Endogenous, Technology-Assisted Methodology
  • Wulf A. Kaal (University of St. Thomas School of Law), Venture Capital as Dynamic Regulation of Disruptive Innovation

Panel B (Room IV)

Financial Market Regulatory Design

Moderator and Discussant:  Benjamin P. Edwards (Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law)

  • John Crawford (University of California Hastings College of the Law), A Regulatory Design for Market Discipline
  • Minor Myers (Brooklyn Law School), Profit-Taking in the Market for Corporate Law

Panel C (Room V)

Securities Market Regulatory Theory

Moderator and Discussant:  Lauren A. Newell (Ohio Northern University Pettit College of Law)

  • Wendy Gerwick Couture (University of Idaho College of Law), A Glass-Half-Empty Approach to Securities Regulation
  • Cary Martin Shelby (DePaul University College of Law), The SEC as the Primary Regulator of Systemic Risk
9:45-9:55 Break
9:55-11:10

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I)

The Intersection of Business Law and Cyber Law

Moderator and Discussant:  Carla L. Reyes (Stetson University College of Law)

  • Kristin N. Johnson (Seton Hall University Law School), Cyber Risks: Emerging Risk Management Concerns for Financial Institutions
  • Tom C.W. Lin (Temple University Beasley School of Law), New Market Manipulation
  • Ge Zhang (Washington University School of Law), The Legal Mechanism for Safeguarding Personal Information of Credit Reporting in the Era of Big Data--The Current Practice in China

Panel B (Room IV)

Financial Market Regulation

Moderator and Discussant: Gina-Gail S. Fletcher (Indiana University Maurer School of Law)

  • Kevin Haeberle (University of South Carolina School of Law), Information-Dissemination Law: The Regulation of How Market-Moving Information Is Regulated
  • Jeremy R. McClane (University of Connecticut School of Law), “Boilerplate” and the Impact of Disclosure in Dealmaking
  • Yuliya Guseva (Rutgers School of Law-Newark), Russian Capital Markets and Shareholder Litigation: Quo Vadis?

Panel C (Room V)

The Intersection of Business and Tax Law

Moderator and Discussant:  Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)

  • Ilya Beylin (Columbia Law School), Taxing Fictive Orders: How an Information Forcing Tax Can Reduce Manipulation and Distortion in Financial Product Markets
  • Limor Riza (Carmel Academic Center), Charitable Contributions and Dependent Care Expenses in a Coherent System
  • Sloan G. Speck (University of Colorado Law School), Competitiveness as a Rationale for International Tax Reform
11:10-11:20 Break
11:20-12:20

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I)

Whistleblowers

Moderator and Discussant:  Yaron Nili (Harvard Law School)

  • Miriam H. Baer (Brooklyn Law School), The Whistleblower’s Dilemma
  • Benjamin P. Edwards (Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law), Regulating Culture: Improving Corporate Governance with Antiarbitration Provisions

Panel B (Room IV)

Risk Regulation

Moderator and Discussant:  Jay B Kesten (Florida State University College of Law)

  • Kristin N. Johnson (Seton Hall University Law School), Diversifying to Mitigate Misconduct Risk
  • Robert F. Weber (Georgia State University College of Law), Why Don't Financial Regulators Talk About Risk Regulation?

Panel C (Room V)

Hot Topics in Securities Regulation

Moderator and Discussant:  Cathy Hwang (Stanford Law School)

  • Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law), Cost-Benefit Analysis and The Conflict Minerals Rule
  • Victoria Schwartz (Pepperdine University School of Law), The Celebrity Stock Market
12:20-12:30 Break
12:30-1:45

Lunch and Keynote Address (South Green Lounge)

The Honorable Diane P. Wood (United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit)

1:45-2:45

Plenary Panel (The Courtroom)

Diverse and Inclusive Leadership in Business:  What's Happening in the Academy, the C-Suite, and the Boardroom?

Moderator and Discussant:  Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)

  • Afra Afsharipour (UC Davis School of Law)
  • E. Thames Fulton (RSR Partners)
  • Mary Ann Hynes (Archdiocese of Chicago)
  • Cynthia Jamison (Tractor Supply Company)
  • Kristin N. Johnson (Seton Hall University Law School)
  • Steven A. Ramirez (Loyola University Chicago School of Law)
  • Darren Rosenblum (Pace Law School)
  • Hillary A. Sale (Washington University School of Law)
2:45-2:55 Break
2:55-4:10

Concurrent Panels

Panel A (Room I)

Understanding the Board

Moderator and Discussant:  Kobi Kastiel  (Harvard Law School)

  • René Reich-Graefe (Western New England University School of Law), Corporate Boards and Calculative Trust: Theory
  • Darren Rosenblum (Pace Law School), When Does Board Diversity Benefit Firms?

Panel B (Room IV)

The Intersection of Business and Contract Law

Moderator and Discussant:  Pamela Foohey (Indiana University Maurer School of Law)

  • Matthew Jennejohn (BYU Law School), Designing Relational Contracts in Asymmetric Innovation Networks
  • Frederick Trilling (Boston University), The Uniform Commercial Code: A View Forward
  • Kelli Alces Williams (Florida State University College of Law), Contract Disclosures as Warnings

Panel C (Room V)

Insider Trading

Moderator and Discussant:  Afra Afsharipour (UC Davis School of Law)

  • Alexander Dill (Chicago-Kent College of Law), U.S. v. Newman and the Mosaic Theory of Investment Research: An Old Theory Gains New Credence
  • Michael D. Guttentag (Loyola Law School, Los Angeles), Selective Disclosure and Insider Trading
  • Donna M. Nagy (Indiana University Maurer School of Law), Beyond Dirks:  Gratuitous Tipping and Insider Trading

 

Keynote Speakers

Professor Steven L. Schwarcz, Stanley A. Star Professor of Law & Business, Duke Law School

Chief Judge Diane P. Wood, The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

Conference Organizers

Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Seton Hall University School of Law)
Elizabeth Pollman (Loyola Law School, Los Angeles)
Margaret V. Sachs (University of Georgia School of Law)
Jeff Schwartz (The University of Utah, College of Law)

Hotel Information

The Omni Hotel Chicago (downtown) is currently holding a block of sleeping rooms for conference attendees. Reserve a room.

Please be aware that June 1, 2016 is the deadline to book rooms in this block. Attendees are encouraged to book well before this date to ensure a room at the negotiated rate of $289 plus tax.

A block of rooms have also been secured at the Hyatt Place South (Hyde Park). Reserve a room at www.chicagosouthuniversity.place.hyatt.com and follow the steps below:

  1. Enter their dates
  2. Click on “Special Rates”
  3. Select “Corporate or Group Code”
  4. Type the group code G-NBLS

Please be aware that May 22, 2016 is the deadline to book rooms in this block. Attendees are encouraged to book well before this date to ensure a room at the negotiated rate of $219 plus tax. Attendees may also secure a room by calling the 24 hour reservations line at (800)233-1234 and referencing the National Business Law Scholars Conference.

Conference schedule

5 Apr 2017 - 3:24pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 3:25pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 3:27pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

5 Apr 2017 - 3:35pm
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"Chief Justice Roberts in His Own Voice: The Chief Justice's Self-Assignment of Majority Opinions"

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6 Apr 2017 - 2:31pm
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An innovative tri-continental intellectual venture in which philosophers based at King's College London, University of Chicago and the National University of Singapore present and discuss work in progress in moral, political and legal philosophy.

6 Apr 2017 - 2:38pm
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Right on Schedule: CEO Option Grants and Opportunism
Robert Daines, Stanford University

6 Apr 2017 - 2:47pm
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The University of Chicago Law School and the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics welcome Sunita Sah, Assistant Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics & Public Policy at Georgetown University and a Research Fellow at the Ethics Center of Harvard University.

Professor Sah will explore her unpublished research as it relates to her previously published works:

  • Insinuation Anxiety: Fear of Signaling Distrust after Conflict of Interest Disclosure
    • Co-authors:  George Loewenstein & Daylian Cain
  • The Burden of Disclosure: Increased Compliance With Distrusted Advice
    • Co-authors:  George Loewenstein & Daylian Cain
  • Nothing to Declare: Mandatory and Voluntary Disclosure Leads Advisors to Avoid Conflicts of Interest
    • Co-author:  George Loewenstein
6 Apr 2017 - 2:50pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum BOS Flyer

6 Apr 2017 - 2:50pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum CHI Flyer

6 Apr 2017 - 2:51pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum SF Flyer

6 Apr 2017 - 2:52pm
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Check out this free forum to find out more about the law school experience and application process.

Law School Forum NY Flyer

6 Apr 2017 - 2:52pm
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This event, sponsored by the Midwest Association for Pre-Law Advisors, is an opportunity for students to connect with law school admission representatives at locations across the midwest.

mapla_flyer.pdf

6 Apr 2017 - 2:53pm
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This event, sponsored by the Midwest Association for Pre-Law Advisors, is an opportunity for students to connect with law school admission representatives at locations across the midwest.

mapla_flyer.pdf

6 Apr 2017 - 2:54pm
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Insider Trading and Market Structure
Yesha Yadav, Associate Professor of Law, Vanderbilt University Law School

6 Apr 2017 - 3:21pm
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Paper title: "If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em? How Sitting by Designation Affects Judicial Behavior"

6 Apr 2017 - 3:23pm
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Paper title: "What Justices Want: Goals and Personality on the U.S. Supreme Court"

6 Apr 2017 - 3:27pm
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Parental Control Rights

6 Apr 2017 - 3:29pm
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Students submitting judicial internship applications to OCS should complete and submit the enclosure sheet for each set of applications submitted. Since judges have different deadlines, you may submit multiple enclosure sheets.

Please download either the PDF or Word Enclosure Sheet below, complete, and submit with your materials.

6 Apr 2017 - 3:31pm
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Come talk to students and professors who are interested in public interest law in a casual setting with delicious food from Yolk provided!

 Add to Calendar

6 Apr 2017 - 3:32pm
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International Students, join OCS and OIA for an informational session to learn about how our offices can support you during your time at the Law School. This session is an orientation designed to review what you need to do to maintain your immigration status, and to look at the different types of work authorizations that are available.

Lunch will be provided.

Add to Calendar

6 Apr 2017 - 3:32pm
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Targeted mainly at 1Ls, this event will be a student-moderated panel of 3Ls talking about their summer public interest jobs.

Add to Calendar

6 Apr 2017 - 3:35pm
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First published in 1985, the University of Chicago Legal Forum is the Law School’s second-oldest journal. The Legal Forum is a student-edited journal that focuses on a single cutting-edge legal issue every year, presenting an authoritative and timely approach to a particular topic.

 

This year, scholars will come together around the topic, "Policing the Police." Seminal developments in case law, the militarization of police, and widely covered police killings make this an important time for evaluating police discretion and the challenges embedded in several interconnected systems. People from all sides of the discussion are willing to talk about reform. Volume 2016 will explore unsettled questions in the area of criminal law with a particular emphasis on the shift from looking at criminals as the sole problem and evaluating the systems that purport to be the solution. The Volume will examine a wide variety of issues, such as police compliance with the law and Miranda Rights; police use of force and deadly force; prosecutorial discretion and special grand jury procedures; civil remedies; and recent topics like body cameras, civil oversight, and police unions. The discussions and papers are a starting point for important conversations that will continue long after publication as the country seeks to reform the broken systems.

 

Panel One: Defining the Problem 9:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m., Room V

  • Sonja Starr, Visiting Professor, University of Chicago Law School (University of Michigan Law School)
  • Samuel Walker, University of Nebraska at Omaha 
  • David Weisburd, George Mason University 
  • Frank Zimring, University of California, Berkeley School of Law 

Panel Two: Case Studies 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Room V

  • Jeffrey Fagan, Columbia Law School 
  • Craig Futterman, University of Chicago Law School 
  • Issa Kohler-Hausmann, Yale Law School 
  • Tracey Maclin, Boston University School of Law 

Keynote Address 12:15 p.m., Room II

  • Tracey L. Meares - Walton Hale Hamilton Professor of Law, Yale University 
  • Lunch provided 

Panel Three: Reforming Police Institutions 1:25 p.m.-2:40 p.m., Room V

  • Eric Miller, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles 
  • Daria Roithmayr, Visiting Professor, University of Chicago Law School (University of Southern California Gould School of Law) 
  • David Thacher, University of Michigan 
  • Tom Tyler, Yale Law School

Panel Four: Barriers to and Agents of Reform 2:50 p.m.-4:20 p.m., Room V

  • Monu Bedi, DePaul University College of Law 
  • Barry Friedman, New York University School of Law 
  • Aziz Huq, University of Chicago Law School 
  • Richard McAdams, University of Chicago Law School 
  • John Rappaport, University of Chicago Law School 
  • Joanna Schwartz, University of California, Los Angeles School of Law

Reception 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Green Lounge

 

This event is free and open to the public.

Event poster

6 Apr 2017 - 3:43pm
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The Office of External Affairs Invites you to the Annual Stout Luncheon

to discuss Making an Impact: How Women Lawyers Can Drive Change

featuring Jeanne Cohn-Connor, ’84, Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

 

Thursday, October 6, 2016

12:15 p.m.–1:20 p.m.

Classroom V

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Cohn-Connor will discuss her experiences as a lawyer in Big Law, insights from her journey practicing law in varied settings, and highlights from her pro bono practice.

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Jeanne Cohn-Connor is a partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the environmental transactions group, where she has a sub-focus in environmental bankruptcy matters.  She has a versatile practice and represents a broad range of clients in restructuring cases, corporate transactions, environmental enforcement cases and compliance matters.

Most recently, Jeanne has served as lead environmental counsel for debtors in a number of high profile restructuring matters, including Energy Future Holdings and its affiliates, Sabine Oil & Gas Corp., Sherwin Alumina, and Edison Mission Energy and several of its subsidiaries.  Jeanne also spearheaded the global environmental settlement for Tronox Incorporated and its affiliates, which involved the resolution of extensive environmental liabilities, initially estimated in the billions of dollars.

In addition to her client work, Jeanne maintains an active pro bono practice.  She leads Kirkland’s Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) program which provides legal assistance to unaccompanied child immigrants.  In 2014, Jeanne accepted KIND’s Allegiance Award for Kirkland’s efforts in representing unaccompanied minors through the immigration process.

Jeanne has been recommended by The Legal 500 U.S. in 2014 and 2015 for Environment: Transactional and Regulatory and has been recognized by leading legal publications for her environmental work. The Deal Pipeline recognized Jeanne for her principal role in the global environmental settlement for Tronox Incorporated in its Chapter 11 proceedings. Law360 also recognized Jeanne for her leadership of Tronox’s environmental settlement negotiations, which helped earn Kirkland a spot among Law360’s Environmental Groups of 2010. In addition, Jeanne has served as a panelist on internationally-broadcast television on pro bono immigration matters and she has been interviewed by various media for her pro bono immigration work, including The American Lawyer, NBC News, Al Jazeera America and Bloomberg News.

Lunch will be provided.

R.S.V.P. by Monday, October 3 to Ann Fruland at afruland@uchicago.edu.

This event is made possible through the Stout Family Fund for Women, Entrepreneurship, and the Law, which was established in 2000 by Jon Stout ’71 and Patricia Stout to support and advance women’s entrepreneurship at the Law School. 

stout_luncheon_poster.pdf

6 Apr 2017 - 3:44pm
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Paper Title: "Formalisms of Law: The Fluctuating Paths of Legal Rhetoric"

6 Apr 2017 - 3:45pm
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It’s almost time to begin planning your 2L job search! Learn how to develop a strategy for your 2L summer search, and find out how networking (such as firm●wise), interview programs, job fairs, and direct applications fit into the big picture. This program is for all 1Ls seeking public interest or private sector opportunities for Summer 2018.

The Office of Career Services expects all 1L students to attend this program.

6 Apr 2017 - 3:47pm
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Each year, one law school professor is chosen to give the annual Coase Lecture, on a topic of his/her choosing and that highlights and introduces students, faculty, staff and community members to the field of law and economics. This year the Professor Anthony Casey has agreed to give the annual Coase Lecture. The title of his talk is  "The Short Happy Life of Rules and Standards."

The choice between rules and standards in lawmaking is a central question. But the line between the two forms is not as clear as most scholars presume. This talk argues that the lack of a coherent  unifying principle in the rules-and-standards distinction is becoming more evident as technologies behind lawmaking evolve. It will explore the leading accounts of rules and standards, the insights they have provided into the process and meaning of law, and why the distinction may be reaching the end of its useful life. The talk will conclude with thoughts on how we should think about forms of law going forward.

This lecture is in honor of Ronald Coase. Coase, who spent most of his academic career at the University of Chicago Law School, helped create the field of law and economics through groundbreaking scholarship that earned him the 1991 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences and through his far-reaching influence as a journal editor.

We hope you will join us for this wonderful event. The event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Reception to follow immediately after the lecture.

Download the poster

6 Apr 2017 - 3:51pm
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*4:00 pm start time

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10 Apr 2017 - 5:37am
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The International Law Society 

presents

International Arbitration | An Overview & Practical Guidance

Featuring: Agustin Sanz and Hugh Carlson, Three Crowns LLP, Washington, D.C.

MONDAY, April 10

Room V

Soul food provided

Join Three Crowns attorneys Mr. Agustin Sanz and Mr. Hugh Carlson in a lunchtime conversation about international arbitration.  Hugh and Agustin will provide an overview of this practice, offer some practical guidance on breaking into the field, and describe how the UChicago economic emphasis can be of value to students’ considering joining this practice.

Mr. Sanz is a senior associate at Three Crowns, and focuses on comparative public and international law from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as valuation in international arbitration.  He holds a JD degree from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), an LLM from the University of Chicago and is currently a JSD candidate at the Law School.  He has extensive experience of both international commercial and investment treaty arbitrations involving disputes in a broad range of sectors.

Mr. Carlson is the Director of Practice at Three Crowns, in which capacity he maintains an active practice in international dispute resolution and serves in a leadership role at the firm.  He has extensive practice experience in international commercial and investment treaty arbitration.  He is an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law, from which he also holds a JD.

Both Agustin and Hugh are lecturers in the Harvard Law School 'Damages in International Arbitration' workshop.

Note: This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 9:18am
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Professors Aziz Huq and András László Pap compare the socio-legal context of illiberal populism in the United States and Hungary, the first self-identified “illiberal democracy” in the European Union. “New populism” centers around a domestic cold war that demonizes political opponents and embraces the ideology and “Zeitgeist” of disenchantment. In this climate, the validity of identity politics and the sustainability of the post-WWII liberal consensus— and even certain sacred democratic institutions—are no longer secure. This brand of illiberalism offers multiple political strategies for neoconservative movements as anti-modernist and fundamentalist answers to the liberal consensus. In response, the speakers will emphasize that while constitutional institutions matter values, social practices and political traditions will also be crucial in deciding the path and fate of democracies.

Lunch provided, seating limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:05pm
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Judge McKeown is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate from the University of Wyoming and earned her JD from Georgetown University. She was a White House Fellow in 1980-81, serving as special assistant to the Secretary of the Interior and special assistant at the White House. She was named by the National Law Journal as one of “the 50 Most Influential Women Lawyers” in the United States. Judge McKeown was a partner in the Seattle and Washington, D.C., offices ofthe Perkins Cole law firm, where she focused on complex litigation, intellectual property, antitrust and trade regulation. She was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit by President Clinton and was confirmed by the United States Senate in 1998. Judge McKeown serves on the Judicial Conference of the United States Codes of Conduct Committee, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Executive Committee, and the board of theAmerican Judicature Society. She is now Jurist-in-Residence and teaches intellectual property law at the University of San Diego Law School.

Lunch Provided.

This event is free and open to the public. No response is required but seating is limited. For special assistance or needs, please contact Rebecca Klaff at 773.834.4326.

Download the paper for the side bar workshop

10 Apr 2017 - 2:07pm
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Wildfire:  Economics, Law & Policy will be a two day symposium held on November 12, 2010, at the University of Arizona in Tucson. 

The symposium is co-sponsored by the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics at the University of Chicago Law School and Program on Economics Law and the Environment at the University of Arizona. Dean Lueck and Karen Bradshaw are co-directing the event.

Symposium Description

The apparent increasing incidence and intensity of wildfires over the past two decades have produced enormous expenditures for suppression efforts by state and federal governments, and substantial and often incalculable environmental and fiscal costs to an assortment of stakeholders.  The power and volatility of wildfires have understandably captured the attention of the media, public, and politicians.  Yet, law and economics scholars have historically been slow to engage with the topic; a trend that is quickly reversing.  Recent publications in top law journals and popular books on the topic suggest that the topic of wildfire is quickly gaining traction among law and economics scholars.  This focus on wildfire law will only increase as wildfires and the attendant public attention on managing them continues to grow. 

There is substantial need for scholarly attention to and analysis of wildfire law and policy.  The issues are complex and rapidly-emerging; ranging from historic tort problems to far-reaching concerns about how wildfires are being used by terrorists and drug lords.  This symposium will bring together law and economics scholars to discuss important public issues.  How can public policy address the effects of climate change on wildfire, and wildfire on climate change?  Are the environmental and fiscal costs of ex ante prevention measures justified?  What are the appropriate levels of prevention and suppression responsibility borne by private, state, and federal actors?  Can tort liability provide a solution for realigning the grossly distorted incentives that currently exist for private landowners and government firefighters?  The larger question is - do the existing incentives in wildlife institutions provide incentives for efficient private and collective action and how might they be improved?

The wildfire law symposia will provide a first-ever forum for influential law and economics scholars to apply the analysis and methodologies of their field to this important area of law in an unprecedented show of scholarly attention to an important public problem.  The goal of the symposium is not only to produce new research on this important topic but also stimulate research after the symposium. The interaction among scholars and literature produced will benefit other issues, including climate change, other natural disasters, and the growing nexus of environmental law and law and economics.

The symposium is open by invitation only and is currently filled.  If you have any questions about the event, contact Karen Bradshaw at kbradshaw@uchicago.edu or Dean Lueck at lueck@email.arizona.edu. The symposium articles will be published in 2011 as an edited volume (Karen Bradshaw and Dean Lueck, co-editors) "Wildfire Policy: Law and Economics Perspectives" by Resources for the Future Press.

Paper Topics (papers are password protected):

Participants

  • Sarah Anderson, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara*
  • Terry Anderson, Executive Director PERC*
  • Jeff Bennett, Professor of Economics, Australian National University
  • Karen Bradshaw, Clerk to the Honorable E. Grady Jolly, Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals*
  • David Dana, Professor of Law Northwestern University
  • Kirsten Engel, Professor of Law and Co-Director Program on Economics, Law and the Environment, University of Arizona*
  • Richard Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law, Director, Olin Program in Law and Economics, University of Chicago Law School*
  • Lee Fennell, Professor of Law, University of Chicago
  • George Frisvold. Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Arizona*
  • Jason Johnston, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law &
    Nicholas E. Chimicles Research Professor of Business Law and Regulation, University of Virginia School of Law*
  • Dean Lueck, Cardon Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Co-Director Program on Economics, Law and the Environment, University of Arizona*
  • Tom W. Merrill, Charles Keller Beekman Professor of Law, Columbia School of Law*
  • Claire Montgomery, Professor of Forestry, Oregon State University
  • Sheila Olmstead, Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future
  • Stephen J. Pyne. Regents Professor of Environmental History, Arizona State University**
  • Carol M. Rose, Lohse Chair in Water and Natural Resources, University of Arizona College of Law
  • Arden Rowell, Bigelow Fellow, University of Chicago Law School 
  • Roger A. Sedjo, Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future
  • Henry E. Smith, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Tom Swetnam, Professor and Director of the Laboratory of Tree-ring Research, University of Arizona**
  • C.C. Van Kooten, Professor of Forestry, University of British Columbia
  • Jonathan Yoder, Associate Professor, Washington State University School of Economic Sciences*

* Author
**  Speaker

MerrillT_FirePaper.pdf

10 Apr 2017 - 2:13pm
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Class of 2019: The Office of Career Services is pleased to host firm•wise, an event that features law firms from all over the country who are eager to get to know you prior to fall 2017 on-campus recruiting.  Please do not bring your resume as firms will not be collecting them. 1Ls who may have class this evening will have time to participate in the event once class is dismissed.

This event is intended for Class of 2019 students only.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:15pm
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The International Law Society, Law School Veterans, and International Programs, with support from the University Military Affinity Group, Graduate Council, and Student Government Finance Committee
present

Adapting Domestic and International Law to Shifting National Security Concerns  
Featuring: General (ret.) Stanley McChrystal 
with Dean Daniel Abebe
Roti boxed lunches provided 

General (ret.) Stanley McChrystal is a former Commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander of United States Forces Afghanistan. During his 34 years with the U.S. Army, he also served as the Director of the Joint Staff (2008-2009) and as commander of the Joint Special Operations Command (2003-2008). Gen. McChrystal now works for McChrystal Group LLC, of which he is the co-founder, and leads the Aspen Institute Franklin Project, whose mission is to encourage and promote national service.

Daniel Abebe’s scholarship focuses primarily on the relationship between the constitutional law of U.S. foreign relations, public international law, and international politics. Abebe currently teaches property, foreign relations law, conflict of laws, and public international law. He has previously taught international trade law, legal issues in international transactions, and refugee and asylum law. 

** This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:18pm
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Recent technological advancements—accompanied by seminal developments in case law—make this an exciting time to evaluate the state of labor and employment law. This year’s Legal Forum Symposium explores the law’s attempts to keep pace with the rapid changes occurring in the modern American workplace. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

 

 

10 Apr 2017 - 2:19pm
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The Kreisman Initiative and the Federalist Society present "Freezing Neighborhoods in Amber: When Over-Preservation Impedes City Growth" with Ilya Shapiro. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Lunch from Cedar's will be provided.

shapiro_flyer.docx

10 Apr 2017 - 2:22pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:36pm
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This event is free and open to the public. Seating may be limited. The paper is available for download through the Judicial Behavior Workshop website.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:40pm
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Prof. David Klein will present his paper "The Vanishing Common Law Judge?" which is forthcoming in the University of Pennslyvania Law Review.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating may be limited. The paper is available for download through the Judicial Behavior Workshop website.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:41pm
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Prof. Segall will present his paper "Eight Justices are Enough: A Proposal to Improve the Supreme Court."

Open to the public but seating may be limited. Paper available at the Judicial Behavior Workshop webpage.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:42pm
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Steve Patton, Corporation Counsel for the City of Chicago, will host a lunchtime program to discuss careers and other opportunities with the City of Chicago Law Department. The Corporation Counsel will lead a panel comprised of UChicago Law and other members of the City of Chicago Law Department. This event is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls. Speakers:

Steve Patton, Corporation Counsel

Liza Franklin, ’93, Deputy Corporation Counsel, Federal Civil Rights Litigation Division

Caroline Lam, ’12, Assistant Corporation Counsel, Torts Division

Carl Newman, ’12, Assistant Corporation Counsel, Appeals Division 

Lunch will be served.

City of Chicago Employer ViewBook

10 Apr 2017 - 2:45pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:54pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

10 Apr 2017 - 2:55pm
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This event, sponsored by the Midwest Association for Pre-Law Advisors, is an opportunity for students to connect with law school admission representatives at locations across the midwest.

mapla_flyer.pdf

10 Apr 2017 - 2:55pm
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This event, sponsored by the Midwest Association for Pre-Law Advisors, is an opportunity for students to connect with law school admission representatives at locations across the midwest.

mapla_flyer.pdf

10 Apr 2017 - 2:57pm
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"The Corporation and the Question of Time"
Lynn Stout, Distinguished Professor of Corporate & Business Law, Cornell Law School

10 Apr 2017 - 3:48pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

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11 Apr 2017 - 8:56am
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. The paper will not be posted, so if you plan to attend and read the paper, please contact Norma.

11 Apr 2017 - 9:10am
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

11 Apr 2017 - 9:12am
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

11 Apr 2017 - 2:47pm
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We look forward to welcoming you back to Chicago on May 5-7 2017 for a full weekend of social, intellectual and celebratory events!

Don't miss the chance to reconnect with old friends, engage with today's faculty and students, and see first-hand how much has changed — and how much has remained the same — since your graduation from Chicago Law. To see a full schedule of events click here

Register now!

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12 Apr 2017 - 2:41pm
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The Hon. Timothy Tymkovich will present "Judicial Independence From Jay to Roberts" at this lunch talk.

On October 1, 2015, Timothy Tymkovich became the Chief Circuit Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, where he has served as a Circuit Judge since 2003. Chief Judge Tymkovich is a graduate of The Colorado College and the University of Colorado School of Law. After graduation, he clerked for Chief Justice William Erickson of the Colorado Supreme Court, and practiced law in Denver until 1991, when he became Colorado's Solicitor General. From 1996 until 2003 he practiced in his own firm, specializing in civil and constitutional matters, ranging from election law to water. Chief Judge Tymkovich has served on several federal judicial committees, and at the end of September 2015, he completed four years as Chair of the Federal Judiciary’s Committee on Judicial Resources. He has been an adjunct professor at CU Law School since 2008.

This event is free and open to Law School students, faculty, and staff.  Lunch will be provided.

12 Apr 2017 - 6:02pm
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The D’Angelo Law Library is holding a workshop, “SRP Success,” to help students select a topic, do research, cite sources appropriately, and organize their substantial research papers. 

12 Apr 2017 - 8:20pm
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Are We In A Constitutional Crisis?
A Conversation about the Future of Democracy

There is no charge for this event. Complimentary valet parking provided.
Business or business casual attire required.

11:30 a.m.: Reception
12:00 noon: Lunch

Please RSVP here.

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13 Apr 2017 - 8:29am
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Domestic and Sexual Violence Project, Defenders, Law Women's Caucus, Education and Child Advocacy Society, and UChicago Assault Awareness and Prevention Committee present:

To POE or Not to POE: The Proper Evidentiary Standard for Campus Sexual Misconduct (A Debate) featuring:

Professors Nancy Chi Cantalupo, Katharine Baker, Daniel Hemel, and Richard Epstein, moderated by Professor Emily Buss

Lunch from Z&H will be provided, funded in part by Student Government.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

13 Apr 2017 - 11:23pm
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Domestic and Sexual Violence Project, Defenders, If/When/How: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice, and the ACLU present:

Abuse Behind Bars: Legal Efforts to End Rape in Prison, featuring the following panelists:

- Alan Mills, Executive Director at Uptown Peoples Law Center
- Sheila Bedi, Clinical Associate Professor of Law at the Northwestern School of Law and an attorney with the Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center
- Gina Fedock, Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration
- Monica Cosby, a prison rape survivor

Professor Claudia Flores will moderate.

Lunch will be provided. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

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14 Apr 2017 - 12:58pm
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The University of Chicago Law School Presents
The 2017 Ulysses and Marguerite Schwartz Memorial Lecture

American Lawyers:  What we have been. What we must be now.  

Featuring Roberta Ramo, Modrall Sperling

Roberta Ramo, a shareholder at Modrall Sperling in Albuquerque, served as president of the American Bar Association from 1995 to 1996, the first woman in history to lead the largest nationwide organization of attorneys.  She also serves as the first woman president of The American Law Institute, elected in 2008.  Ramo will share her thoughts on the obligations of American lawyers to the Democracy from private clients to government positions. 

RSVP here: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/38315/Schwartz

14 Apr 2017 - 5:08pm
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Kreisman Housing Initiative - April 2017 Gleacher Breakfast Panel

                

Please join us for this breakfast and presentation on "Place-Based Redevelopment Strategies: The Case of the Reclaiming Southwest Chicago Campaign"

April 17, 2017
8:00 AM – Breakfast
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Panel

Gleacher Center
450 N. Cityfront Plaza Drive
Room 208

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register, please visit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/37992/Kreisman.

Jeff Leslie (Moderator)
Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning, Clinical Professor of Law, Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative, Co-director of the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy, and Faculty Director of Curriculum.

Jeff Leslie graduated from Yale College and Yale Law School and clerked for Judge Joel M. Flaum of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Before joining the Law School, he was an Assistant Corporation Counsel in the City of Chicago Department of Law, where he worked on affordable housing and economic development transactions. He is the Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative Clinic, representing community-based affordable housing developers, and teaches courses in commercial real estate, affordable housing law and policy, negotiations, and transactional lawyering skills. He currently serves as the Faculty Director of Curriculum and as Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning. 

Jeff Bartow
Executive Director, Southwest Organizing Project

Jeff has been organizing in the Chicago metropolitan area since 1989, after spending 10 years organizing in Fort Worth, Texas. Jeff has been a resident of Southwest Chicago since 1992. He joined SWOP as Executive Director in September 2002. Prior to becoming the Executive Director of SWOP, he served as the Executive Director of the Interfaith Leadership Project of Cicero, Berwyn and Stickney for nearly a decade.

Susan J. Popkin, PhD
Senior Fellow, Urban Institute

Susan Popkin is a senior fellow and director of the Neighborhoods and Youth Development initiative in the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute. A nationally recognized expert on public and assisted housing, Popkin directs a research program that focuses on the ways neighborhood environments affect outcomes for youth and on assessing comprehensive community-based interventions. A particular focus is gender differences in neighborhood effects and improving outcomes for marginalized girls.

Popkin’s current projects include the multisite HOST demonstration, which is testing two-generation service models for vulnerable families in public and assisted housing while creating a network of housing providers seeking to use housing as a platform for services; PASS, a community-based participatory research effort to develop strategies to promote sexual health and safety for adolescents and reduce coercive and risky behavior; the evaluation of the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative; and the evaluation of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family-Centered Community Change Initiative.

Popkin is the coauthor of the award-winning Moving to Opportunity: The Story of an American Experiment to Fight Ghetto Poverty, lead author of The Hidden War: Crime and the Tragedy of Public Housing in Chicago, and coauthor of Public Housing Transformation: The Legacy of Segregation.

Amir Sufi, PhD
Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Amir Sufi is the Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He serves as an associate editor for the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Professor Sufi's research focuses on finance and macroeconomics. He has articles published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Finance, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. His recent research on household debt and the economy has been profiled in the Economist, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. It has also been presented to policy-makers at the Federal Reserve, the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs, and the White House Council of Economic Advisors. This research forms the basis of his book co-authored with Atif Mian: House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession and How We Can Prevent It from Happening Again, which was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2014.

Sufi graduated Phi Beta Kappa with honors from the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University with a bachelor's degree in economics. He earned a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 2005.

PARKING

Parking is available free of charge at the lot at 201 E Illinois. Enter the lot, located at the intersection of Lower Illinois and St. Clair, from either the Lower Illinois or St. Clair entrance. Take a ticket from the machine as you enter the lot, and pick up a validation sticker as you check in for the panel event. The sticker will allow you to exit the lot free of charge following the event. You may find this map of parking lots surrounding the Gleacher Center helpful. The 201 E Illinois lot is marked with a "4" on page two of the map.

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register, please visit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/37992/Kreisman.


This event is organized by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy at the University of Chicago Law School, which brings together the best housing research at the University of Chicago to engage the real estate, public policy, and financial communities. The Initiative is co-directed by Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law at the Law School, and Jeff Leslie, Clinical Professor of Law and Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative at the Law School.

Southwest Chicago Event Poster

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17 Apr 2017 - 8:51pm
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Earlier this year, nationally-recognized public speaking coach Marsha Hunter, in partnership with Schiff Hardin, presented a lecture on general communication skills titled, “The Always Articulate Attorney.” Marsha returns to Chicago on Friday, May 5 where she will conduct 90 minute, small group oral advocacy workshops. Participants will have the chance to practice a portion of either their Bigelow oral argument or another prepared speech and receive substantial individual feedback regarding their presentation and speaking styles from Marsha. The program is non-evaluative – it is solely a professional growth opportunity.

RSVP's are required at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/OralAdvocacyWorkshop. There are three times available to participate throughout the day. Sponsored by Schiff Hardin.

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18 Apr 2017 - 3:45pm
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Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy, Law of the Land, the Public Interest Law Society, and the Black Law Students Association present:

 

NOT WELCOME:  The Uneven Geographies of Housing Choice

                

Panelists:

Andrea Juracek, Associate Director, Housing Choice Partners
JoAnn Newsome, Director of Human Rights Compliance, Chicago Commission on Human Relations

Jackie Paige, Member, National Housing Residents Association

Betsy Shuman-Moore, Director of the Fair Housing and Hate Crime Project, Chicago Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Charles Barlow (Moderator)  Lecturer in Public Policy and Geography, The University of Chicago

 

Lunch will be provided. This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited.  

The Housing Choice Voucher program seeks to combat socioeconomic segregation by affording low-income families an opportunity to rent quality housing in the private market in higher-income neighborhoods. However, despite advancements in fair housing protections in recent years, persistent source of income discrimination leaves many voucher holders unable to secure their choice of housing.

Through the voices and perspectives of residents, enforcement agencies, advocacy organizations, and housing service providers, panelists will examine barriers to housing choice and explore mechanisms to secure fair housing opportunities in the Chicago region for Housing Choice Voucher households.


This event is organized by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy at the University of Chicago Law School, which brings  together the best housing research at the University of Chicago to engage the real estate, public policy, and financial communities. The Initiative is co-directed by Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law at  the Law School, and Jeff Leslie, Clinical Professor of Law and Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative at the Law School.

18 Apr 2017 - 5:08pm
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Are you planning to work in a public interest position after graduation?  Have you accepted a judicial clerkship?

If so, are you planning to participate in the Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP)?  Do you have any questions about LRAP?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions – please join the Financial Aid Office on Wednesday, April 26.

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP here by Monday, April 24

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20 Apr 2017 - 4:32pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Lunch will be provided.

20 Apr 2017 - 4:34pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Lunch will be provided.

20 Apr 2017 - 4:35pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Lunch will be provided.

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21 Apr 2017 - 2:50pm
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Please join the Law Review, the Chicago Journal of International Law, and the Legal Forum for a panel discussion with representatives from all three journals. Panelists will provide overviews of their journals, answer questions about their experiences as members, and highlight the benefits of joining a journal. Lunch provided.

Each talk will cover the same topics, so students need attend only one.

21 Apr 2017 - 2:52pm
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Please join the Law Review, the Chicago Journal of International Law, and the Legal Forum for a panel discussion with representatives from all three journals. Panelists will provide overviews of their journals, answer questions about their experiences as members, and highlight the benefits of joining a journal. Lunch provided.

Each talk will cover the same topics, so students need attend only one.

21 Apr 2017 - 2:54pm
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Join the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society for a panel discussion with the Hon. Jill Pryor, Hon. L. Felipe Restrepo, and Hon. Richard J. Sullivan.  Professor Dennis Hutchinson will serve as the moderator for the panel. Boxed lunches will be served 

21 Apr 2017 - 2:56pm
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Students are encouraged to attend the final round of the Edward W. Hinton Moot Court Competition. The case argued is Davila v. Davis, No. 16-6219.  Please join the finalists for a reception in the Courtroom Corridor after the arguments conclude at 4:00pm.

Questions Presented: 

1) Does the rule established in Martinez v. Ryan, 132 S. Ct. 1309 (2012), and Trevino v. Thaler, 133 S. Ct. 1911, 1921 (2013), that ineffective state habeas counsel can be seen as cause to overcome the procedural default of a substantial ineffective assistance of trial counsel claim, also apply to procedurally defaulted, but substantial, ineffective assistance of appellate counsel claims? 

2) In light of Hurst v. Florida, 136 S. Ct. 616, 622 (2016), must Texas’ second punishment special issue be decided by the jury beyond a reasonable doubt?

Petitioners: Kaitlin Beck & Joe Egozi

Respondents: Julius Kairey & Joshua Pickar

The final round will be judged by three federal judges: Judge Jill Pryor, U.S. Court of Appeals, Eleventh Circuit; Judge L. Felipe Restrepo, U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit; and Judge Richard J. Sullivan, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York.

Time: 3:00pm Arguments, 4:00pm Reception

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23 Apr 2017 - 12:55pm
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This year's LSA Open will take place at Coyote Run Golf Course in Flossmoor, Illinois on Saturday May 13th; just a 30 minute drive from the law school and 40 minutes from downtown.  This event is sponsored by the Law Students Association, the student government body for The University of Chicago Law School.

The tournament format will be a 4 person scramble, with corresponding contests for long drive and closest to the pin on designated holes.  Shotgun start will begin promptly at 2pm, with unlimited range balls before tee off starting at 1pm.  You may sign up as a foursome, threesome, twosome or single.  However, threesome's, twosome's and singles will be paired with other groups at the discretion of the course and tournament committee. 

The cost per golfer is $60, which includes green fee, cart, unlimited range balls, two drink tickets for the round (which can be redeemed for soda, bottled water, or domestic beer), and a buffet dinner after the round.  Rental clubs will be available at the course for a cost of $15-20.

Register here: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/golf

Please contact Drew Gregory, ’17, at andrewgregory@uchicago.edu with any questions.

We hope to see you there!

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