Calendar

March 2017

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2 Mar 2017 - 3:41pm
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The Section of Family Planning & Contraceptive Research and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at The University of Chicago are proud to host a one-day conference on reproductive justice and health care reform, examining the impact of reform on the reproductive health of underserved women and youth. This conference is co-sponsored by the Center for Health and the Social Sciences (CHeSS), the Center for Health Administration Studies (CHAS), and the International House Global Voices Program.

The conference will feature speakers presenting research on the ways in which health care reform offers benefits and new challenges for the reproductive health of underserved women and youth.

Keynote Speakers:
Toni Bond Leonard, President/CEO, Black Women for Reproductive Justice
Harold Pollack, PhD, Professor at the School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago
Adam Sonfield, MPP, Senior Public Policy Associate, Guttmacher Institute

Additional Speakers:
Kym Ahrens, MD, MPH, Seattle Children's Research Institute/University of Washington
& Amy Dworsky, PhD, University of Chicago
Susan Berke Fogel, JD, National Health Law Program
Amanda Dennis, MBE, Ibis Reproductive Health
Angel Foster, DPhil, MD, AM, Ibis Reproductive Health
Debra Stulberg, MD, MAPP, University of Chicago

2 Mar 2017 - 3:52pm
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At first blush, the rise of the independent director in Asia appears to be a straightforward example of a significant legal transplant from the United States to Asia. A few decades ago, independent directors, which are an American legal invention, were virtually non-existent in Asia.  Today, they are ubiquitous throughout Asia. 

The meteoric rise of the ‘independent director’ in Asia is considerably more complex than it appears. Although the label ‘independent director’ has been transplanted precipitously from the US (in some cases via the UK) throughout Asia, who is labelled an ‘independent director’ (i.e., the ‘form’ that independent directors take) and what independent directors do (i.e., the function they perform) in Asia differ significantly from the American concept of the independent director.  To add to the complexity, the form and function of ‘independent directors’ varies within Asia from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.  As such, in reality, there are varieties of independent directors in Asia—none of which conform to the American concept of the independent director. This challenges the widely-held assumption that ‘independent directors’ are universally similar and follow the American concept of the independent director. 

The practical and theoretical implications of this finding will be explored in this seminar. This seminar is based on a co-authored chapter by Dan W. Puchniak (National University of Singapore) and Kon Sik Kim (Seoul National University), which will be part of a forthcoming edited volume on “Independent Directors in Asia” published by Cambridge University Press later this year. 

Dr. Dan W. Puchniak is the Director of the National University of Singapore (NUS) Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS), the Editor-in-Chief of the Asian Journal of Comparative Law (AsJCL) and an Associate Professor at NUS Law. Dan has received numerous domestic and international awards for his academic research and teaching.

In 2016, Dan was a Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo where he taught an intensive course on comparative corporate law with leading corporate law professors from around the world. In 2015, Dan was a Visiting Fellow in the Commercial Law Centre at Harris Manchester College (Oxford University), Visiting Professor and Global Challenge Visiting Scholar at Seoul National University School of Law, Visiting Associate Professor at Vanderbilt Law School and Visiting Scholar of Law at the University of Chicago Law School.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Lunch will  be provided.

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Orientation Schedule

FINAL

Fall 2009 - Class of 2012

Tuesday, September 22

(The events on Tuesday are planned by our main campus Graduate Affairs division, and your attendance is entirely optional.  We will present most of the information about available campus resources during our Law School orientation, but the social hour, at least, will give you an opportunity to connect with the larger graduate student community at the University of Chicago.  Please see http://grad.uchicago.edu/campus/orientation for additional details) 

12:00 noon -4:00 p.m. 

  • New Graduate & Professional Student Orientation (Main Campus)
    Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 East 59th Street. Chicago 60637
    Includes sessions on Graduate Student Life, Campus Resources, and Living in Chicago 

4:00 - 5:30 p.m. 

  • Information Fair and Social Hour hosted by the Graduate Council   

Day 1 at the Law School: Life of the Mind

Wednesday, September 23

  • 8:30 - 9:15 a.m.: Welcome Breakfast and Short Tours- Green Lounge
    • Check-in
    • Pick up Orientation materials
    • Law School Tour
  • 9:15 - 9:45: A Welcoming Tradition for 1Ls - Classroom Wing and James Park Hall Concourse
  • 9:45 - 10:40: Deans' Welcomes and Introductions - Auditorium
  • 10:45 - 11:45: Keeping An Open Mind -  Faculty Panel  - Auditorium
    • Comparative Constitutionalism - Professors Rosalind Dixon and Tom Ginsburg
  • 11:45 - 1:00 p.m.: Lunch and Small Section Introductions 
  • Section A    Room I
  • Section B     Room III
  • Section C    Room IV
  • Section D    Room V
  • Section E    Room D
  • Section F    Room F
  • 1:00 - 2:00 Academic Life at the Law School - Auditorium
    •  Faculty Welcome to the Law School and Panel Discussion - Professors Emily Buss, Anup Malani, and Adam Samaha
  • 2:15 - 3:15: What to Expect During your First Class?
    • Discuss Case Briefing and Academic Resources with Academic Counselors
    • A-E    Room I
    • F-J    Room III
    • K-O    Room IV
    • P-T    Room V
    • U-Z    Room D
  • 3:15 – 3:30 p.m.    Professor Anup Malani – Short survey
  • 4:00 p.m.  Law School Tours (meet at the front desk)
  • 4:30: Refreshments by the Reflecting Pool for the Boat Cruise and Board Buses
  • 5:00: Buses Depart for the Boat Cruise (front of the Law School)
  • 6:00 - 8:00 Boat Cruise aboard the Evening Star, Navy Pier
  • 8:15 Buses Depart from the Boat Cruise for Hyde Park
    • Students can explore dinner on their own downtown.   

Day 2: Joining the Legal Profession

 Thursday, September 24

  •  8:45 - 9:15 a.m. Continental Breakfast - Green Lounge
    • Sign up for Community service
  • 9:15 – 9:30 a.m.    Welcome from Career Services
  • Abbie Willard, Associate Dean for Career Services
  • 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. If I’d Only Known Then What I Know Now – Auditorium
    • Professor Todd Henderson ’98,
    • Dean Marsha Nagorsky ’95, 
    • Associate Director of Student Affairs Maureen Sheehan ’04,
    • Clinical Instructor Tara Thompson ’03
  • 10:45 - 11:15     Academic Policies and Resources - Auditorium
  • Judith Wright, Associate Dean for Library Services
  • Michele Baker Richardson, Dean of Students
  • 11:15 - 11:45     Online Resources and Identity Management - Communications - Auditorium
    • Aaron Rester, Manager of Electronic Communications
  • 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. Taste of Hyde Park Lunch - Green Lounge
  • 1:30 - 2:15 Financial Management for Law Students - Auditorium
    • Karla Vargas, Director of Financial Aid, and the Student Loan Administration
  • 2:30 - 3:15 Introduction to On-Campus Resources - Auditorium and Classroom Wing
    • Transportation and Campus Safety, Marlon Lynch, Chief Safety Office
    • Student Care Center, Dr. Kristine Bordenave, Director 
    • Student Counseling and Resource Center, Dr. Thomas Kramer, Director
  • 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Campus Resource Fair – Law School Classroom Hallway
    • Representatives from several campus services will be available in the Law School to answer individual questions.
    • Going Green at the Law SchoolGreenbooks Book Sale  Classroom III
      Purchase used textbooks with proceeds going to students working in public interest and environmental programming.  Cash or check only.
    • Chicago Law Foundation T-Shirt Sale – Classroom IV
      Purchase Chicago Law gear with proceeds going to students working in public interest.  Cash or check only
  • 5:00 Entering Students Cocktails and Dinner - Green Lounge
    • Business Attire Suggested
    • Please wear your nametag.

Day 3: Law as a Service Profession

Friday, September 25

  •  8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Law School Day of Service - Room IV
    • Breakfast for Service Activity Volunteers with Service Oriented Student Organizations
  • 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Service Activities with the University Community Service Center - Room IV
  • 1:00 - 2:00 Lunch for Service Activity Volunteers with Clinical Faculty
  • Featuring Professor Randolph Stone, Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic

  • 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Queer 101 – Graduate Orientation for LGBTQ Students
    • Sponsored by the Graduate Affairs Division
      Main Campus – 5710 South Woodlawn
  • 4:00 - 5:30 Celebrating Diversity Reception - 5710 South Woodlawn
    • Student groups invite the Class of 2012 to a reception at the Multicultural Student Center on Campus

Orientation Continued…

Saturday, September 26

  • 10:30-noon Living with Your Law Student – Classroom V
  • A panel discussion for spouses and partners of incoming law students.  Please join us after the session for an ice cream social sponsored by Amicus, a married/partnered student organization. Children welcome!

Tuesday, September 29

  • 4:00 p.m.  Computer and Library Training (Sections A&B) – Classroom V

Wednesday, September 30

  • 4:00 p.m.  Computer and Library Training (Sections C&D) – Classroom V

Thursday, October 1

  • 4:00 p.m.  Computer and Library Training (Sections E&F) – Classroom V

Autumn Quarter Student Events

Wednesday, September 30

  • 9:00 p.m. Big Sibling Mentoring Program Coffee Mess – Green Lounge
  • Please join your mentoring group for coffee, bagels, and donuts. 
  • 12:15 p.m. Chicago’s Best Ideas featuring Professor Henderson – Room II

Friday, October 2

  • 4:00 p.m. Student Organizations Activity Fair and Welcome BBQ – Green Lounge
  • Meet the leadership of the various Law School Student Organizations and celebrate completing your first week of class.

Wednesday, October 7

  • 9:00 p.m. The Devil in the White City Coffee Mess – Green Lounge
  • Please join Professors Masur and McAdams to discuss The Devil in the White City over coffee.

Tuesday, October 13

  • 12:15 p.m.  Chicago’s Best Ideas featuring Professor Ben-Shahar – Room II

Monday, October 19 through Friday, October 23

  • Various times - Diversity Week Events

Tuesday, November 10

  • 12:15 p.m. Chicago’s Best Ideas featuring Dean Levmore – Room II
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Students with questions about OCI should contact the Office of Career Services.

Employers can find information about the Fall 2009 On-Campus Interview Program here.

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Students with questions about OCI should contact the Office of Career Services.

Employers can find information about the Fall 2009 On-Campus Interview Program here.

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Students and employers should log in to https://law-uchicago-csm.symplicity.com/ for details.

Questions? Contact Paul Woo at p-woo1@uchicago.edu.

2 Mar 2017 - 4:08pm
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On-Campus Interviews will NOT take place on Saturday, August 28, or Sunday, August 29.

Students and employers should log in to https://law-uchicago-csm.symplicity.com/ for details.

Questions? Contact Paul Woo at p-woo1@uchicago.edu.

Directions to Chicago Booth:


View Larger Map

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See http://www.law.uchicago.edu/graduation for additional information.

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TRANSFER STUDENT ORIENTATION 2011
Thursday, August 18 and Friday, August 19
All events are in Room V unless otherwise specified.

Thursday

Please wear close-toed shoes, long pants, and clothes you can get dirty.  Please bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the Chicago Food Depository.

  • 9:30 a.m. - Registration
  • 10:00 a.m. - Welcomes, Introductions 
    • Michael H. Schill, Dean and Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law 
    • Ann Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions 
    • Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students 
    • Shannon Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs 
  • 10:30 a.m. - Law School Information Tours and Library Overview 
    • Winston Gu and Julia Kasper, Rising 3Ls and Transfer Student Coordinators
    • Library Personnel
  • 11:15 a.m. - Break; Pick up Boxed Lunches
  • 11:30 a.m. - Career Services and Public Interest        
    • Abbie Willard, Associate Dean for Career Services & Policy Initiatives
    • Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
    • Susan Curry, Director, Public Interest Law & Policy 
  • 12:00 p.m. - Overview of Clinics and Experiential Programs 
    • Jeff Leslie, Acting Associate Dean for Clinical and Experiential Learning, Clinical Professor of Law and Faculty Director of Curriculum 
  • 12:30 p.m. - Bus Departs for Service Activity
    • Incoming transfer students, Winston Gu, and Julia Kasper
  • 1:00 p.m. - Service Activity at the Chicago Food Depository
  • 4:00 p.m. - Bus departs Chicago Food Depository to return to the Law School
  • 4:45 p.m. - Bus arrives at the Law School
  • 4:45 p.m. - Dessert Social in the South Green Lounge Sponsored by Themis Bar Review

Friday

Please bring your laptop. 

  • 9:00 a.m.  - Mini Coffee Mess
    Sponsored by External Affairs
    Be sure to pick up a special gift from External Affairs!
  • 9:30 a.m. - Topic Access Program
    • Journal Topic Access Editors: Hillary Guigue August, Law Review Topic Access & Recruitment Editor; Tamara Hill, Chicago Journal of International Law Executive Editor; Legal Forum Representative TBD
  • 10:00 a.m. - Law School Computing 
    • David Blood, Student Computer Lab Manager 
  • 10:30 a.m. - Registration/Exam Taking Nuts and Bolts
    • Roberto Koch, Registrar 
  • 11:00 a.m. - Electronic Resources and Protecting Your Online Reputation
    • Aaron Rester, Manager of Electronic Communications 
  • 11:45 a.m. - Break; Your first of many lunches catered by The Snail
  • 12:00 p.m. - Uniquely U of C – Student Perspective
    Panel of 3Ls who transferred in last year moderated by Julia Kasper
    • Alexis Bates, Rising 3L and President of Law School Chapter of the American Constitution Society
    • Bobby Earles, Rising 3L and Black Law Students Association Alumni Chair
    • Scott Wolf, Rising 3L and 2010-2011 Transfer Law Students Association Representative
  • 1:15 p.m. - Getting Started at the University and the Law School 
    • Shannon Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs 
  • 2:00 p.m. - Clerkships 
    • Lior Strahilevitz, Deputy Dean and Sidley Austin Professor of Law
    • Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
  • 2:30 p.m. - Break; Snacks
  • 2:45 p.m. - Financial Aid and LRAP
    • Karla Vargas, Director of Financial Aid 
  • 3:30 p.m. - Academic Policies and Resources
    • Roberto Koch, Registrar
    • Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
    • Judith Wright, Associate Dean for Library Services
  • 4:00 p.m. - An Introduction to Law & Economics
    • Douglas G. Baird, Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law 
  • 4:45 p.m. - Overview of Transfer Programs/Office of the Dean of Students Programming/Wrap-Up
    • Julia Kasper and Dean Gardner
  • 5:15 p.m. - Meet at VCA Desk to Carpool or Walk to Seven Ten Lanes
  • 5:30 p.m. - Transfer Student Welcome Reception and Bowling Party (RSVP by 8/15 requested)
    Seven Ten Lanes, 1055 East 55th Street   
    New students, their spouses/significant others and their transfer buddies are welcome to attend.
2 Mar 2017 - 4:10pm
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Please note: Interviews will not be conducted on Saturday, August 27th or Sunday, August 28th

Information for students: https://law-uchicago-csm.symplicity.com/stude...

Information for employers: https://law-uchicago-csm.symplicity.com/emplo...

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TRANSFER STUDENT ORIENTATION 2012
Thursday, August 16 and Friday, August 17
All events are in Room V unless otherwise specified.

Thursday

Please wear close-toed shoes, long pants, and clothes you can get dirty.  Please bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the Chicago Food Depository.  You will receive a class t-shirt to wear for the class picture and service activity.

  • 9:00 a.m. - Registration
    Please allow plenty of time to find parking if you plan to drive (the Law Lot will not be available) and to pick up your registration packet and t-shirt.
  • 9:30 a.m. - Welcomes, Introductions
    • Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions
    • Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
    • Shannon P. Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs
  • 10:00 a.m. - Law School Information Tours and Library Overview
    • Matea Bozja and Ehren Fournier, Rising 3Ls and Transfer Student Coordinators
    • Library Personnel
  •  10:45 a.m. - Overview of the UChicago 1L Year
    • Jonathan Masur, Deputy Dean, Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar
  • 11:15 a.m. - Career Services and Public Interest               
    • Abbie Willard, Associate Dean for Career Services & Policy Initiatives
    • Susan Curry, Director, Public Interest Law & Policy
  •  11:45 a.m. - Break; Pick up Boxed Lunches

  • 12:15 p.m. - Group Photo

  • 12:30 p.m. - Bus Departs for Service Activity
    • Incoming transfer students, 3L transfer buddies, Ehren Fournier
  • 1:00 p.m. - Service Activity

  • 4:00 p.m. - Buses depart Service Sites to return to the Law School

  • 4:45 p.m. - Buses arrive at the Law School

  • 4:45 p.m. - Dessert Social in the South Green Lounge
    Sponsored by Themis Bar Review

Friday

Please bring your laptop.

  • 9:00 a.m. - Mini Coffee Mess
    Sponsored by External Affairs

    Be sure to pick up a special gift from External Affairs!

  • 9:30 a.m. - UChicago Journals & Topic Access Programs
    • Jaime Willis, Rising 3L and Topic Access Editor, University of Chicago Law Review
  •  9:45 a.m. - Law School Computing
    • David Blood, Student Computer Lab Manager
  • 10:30 a.m. - Electronic Resources and Protecting Your Online Reputation
    • Aaron Rester, Manager of Electronic Communications
  • 11:00 a.m. - Academic Policies and Resources
    • Roberto Koch, Registrar
    • Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
    • Judith Wright, Associate Dean for Library Services
  •  11:45 a.m. - Break; Your first of many lunches catered by The Snail
  •  12:00 p.m. - Uniquely UChicago – Student Perspective
    • Panel of students who transferred in last year led by Transfer Coordinators Matea Bozja and Ehren Fournier
  • 1:15 p.m. - Break
  •  1:30 p.m. - Getting Started at the University and the Law School
    • Shannon Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs
  •  2:00 p.m. - Clerkships
    • Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
  •  2:30 p.m. - Financial Aid and LRAP
    • Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions
    • Kevin Petty, Assistant Director, Admissions & Financial Aid
  • 3:00 p.m. - Break; Snacks
  •  3:15 p.m. - Q&A Session
    • Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
    • Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
  •  3:45 p.m. - An Introduction to Law & Economics
    • Douglas G. Baird, Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law
  • 4:30 p.m. - Overview of Transfer Programs/Office of the Dean of Students Programming/Wrap-Up
    • Matea Bozja, Ehren Fournier and Dean Gardner
  • 5:15 p.m. - Meet at VCA Desk to Carpool or Walk to Seven Ten Lanes
  • 5:30 p.m. - Transfer Student Welcome Reception and Bowling Party (Please RSVP by 8/13)
    Seven Ten Lanes, 1055 East 55th Street
    Spouses/significant others are welcome to attend.  Your transfer buddies are invited to this event.
2 Mar 2017 - 4:11pm
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The following non-seminar courses and non-1L courses may not meet on Wednesday, May 22nd:

 

  • Corporate Reorganizations (Professor Baird)
  • Taxation of Corporations II (Professor Weisbach)
  • Criminal Procedure I (Professor McAdams)
  • Federal Regulation of Securities (Professor Henderson)
  • Local Government Law (Professor Roin)
  • Public Choice (Professor Levmore)
  • Criminal Procure I (Professor Epstein)
  • Federal Criminal Law (Professor Miles)
  • Legal Profession (Professor Alberts)
  • Health Law (Professor Malani)
  • Regulation of Investment Professionals (Professor Henderson)
  • Telecommunications Law and Regulation (Professor Neal)
  • Privacy (Professor Strahilevitz)
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Thursday classes meet on Friday, and Friday classes meet on Thursday.  Except lunch workshops and all classes starting at 4 p.m. or later, which will meet regulary.

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Monday, June 2nd – Contracts

Ben-Shahar/Posner – Monday, June 2nd between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

Baird/Morrison – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

Wednesday, June 4th – Criminal Procedure

Ferzan/McAdams – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Masur/Miles – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

Friday, June 6th – Civil Procedure II

LaCroix – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Wood – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

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2Ls, 3Ls, LLMs

In-Class Exams:

Evidence – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Foreign Relations Law – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Legislation and Statutory Interpretation – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

LLM Exams (a.m.) – 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

 

Criminal Procedure I – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Development of Legal Institutions – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Local Government Law – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

LLM Exams (p.m.) – 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

 

Take-Home Exams:

American Legal History: The Twentieth Century – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 23rd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 27th

Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 23rd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 27th

 

1Ls

In-Class Exams:

Evidence – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Foreign Relations Law – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Legislation and Statutory Interpretation – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Criminal Procedure I – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Local Government Law – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Development of Legal Institutions – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

 

Take-Home Exams:

American Legal History: The Twentieth Century – Monday, May 26th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication – Monday, May 26th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

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Due to Admitted Students Weekend, the course schedules will be swapped for Thursday, April 10, and Friday, April 11, for all classes other than those that meet during lunch or begin at 3:30 pm or later.  If you would normally have class on Thursday, April 10 (other than during lunch or starting at 3:30 pm or later), you will have class at the same time, in the same room, on Friday, April 11.  And if you would normally have class on Friday, April 11 (other than lunch or beginning 3:30 or later), you will have class at the same time in the same room on Thursday, April 10.  Lunchtime classes, including the Constitutional Law Workshop, and seminars that begin at 3:30 or later, are unaffected by this change. 

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Due to Admitted Students Weekend, the course schedules will be swapped for Thursday, April 10, and Friday, April 11, for all classes other than those that meet during lunch or begin at 3:30 pm or later.  If you would normally have class on Thursday, April 10 (other than during lunch or starting at 3:30 pm or later), you will have class at the same time, in the same room, on Friday, April 11.  And if you would normally have class on Friday, April 11 (other than lunch or beginning 3:30 or later), you will have class at the same time in the same room on Thursday, April 10.  Lunchtime classes, including the Constitutional Law Workshop, and seminars that begin at 3:30 or later, are unaffected by this change. 

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2L/3L classes that meet 3 times/week will not meet on this day.  This change will not affect 1L classes, 1L electives, or any class that meets fewer than 3 times/week during Spring Quarter.  Classes that will be affected are: Con Law I, Corporate Finance, Advanced Civil Procedure, Legal Profession, Patent Law, Federal Regulation of Securities, Taxation of Corporations II, Telecommunications Law and Regulation, American Law and the Rhetoric of Race, Federal Courts, Land Use, Network Industries, and Marriage (at the discretion of Professor Case). 

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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Please bring your laptop.

9:00 a.m.              Registration
Please allow plenty of time to find parking if you plan to drive (the Law Lot will not be available) and to pick up your registration packet and t-shirt.

9:30 a.m.              Welcomes, Introductions
Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions
Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
Shannon P. Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs

10:00 a.m.            Law School Information Tours and Library Overview
Laura Bernescu and Jeff Gilson, Rising 3Ls and Transfer Student Coordinators
Library Personnel

10:45 a.m.            Overview of the UChicago 1L Year
Jonathan Masur, Deputy Dean, Professor of Law and Herbert and Marjorie Fried Teaching Scholar

11:15 a.m.            Law School Computing
David Blood, Student Computer Lab Manager

11:45 a.m.            Break; Your first of many lunches catered by Cedars

12:00 p.m.            Uniquely UChicago – Student and Alumni Perspective
Panel of students and alumni who transferred to UChicago Law and led by Laura Bernescu
Alexis Bates, ’12, Associate, Skadden, Arps
Katie Knue, Rising 3L
Kelly Albinak Kribs, ’11, Associate, Sidley, and Former Clerk, Judge Rebecca R. Pallmeyer, ‘79
Raj Srinivasan, Rising 3L
Scott Wolf, ’12, Associate, Kirkland & Ellis

1:15 p.m.              Break

1:30 p.m.              Getting Started at the University and the Law School
Shannon P. Bartlett, Associate Director of Student Affairs

2:00 p.m.              Financial Aid and LRAP
Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions
Kevin Petty, Assistant Director, Admissions & Financial Aid

2:30 p.m.              Clerkships
Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services

3:00 p.m.              Break; Snacks

3:15 p.m.              Q&A Session
Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students

3:45 p.m.              An Introduction to Law & Economics
Douglas G. Baird, Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law

5:15 p.m.              Meet at VCA Desk to Carpool or Walk to Seven Ten Lanes

5:30 p.m.              Transfer Student Welcome Reception and Bowling Party (Please RSVP by 8/9)
Seven Ten Lanes, 1055 East 55th Street         
Spouses/significant others are welcome to attend.  Your transfer buddies are invited to this event.

Thursday August 15, 2013

Please wear close-toed shoes, long pants, and clothes you can get dirty.  Please bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the Greater Chicago Food Depository.  You will receive a class t-shirt to wear for the class picture and service activity.

8:45 a.m.              Mini Coffee Mess
Sponsored by External Affairs

Be sure to pick up a special gift from External Affairs!

9:15 a.m.              UChicago Journals & Topic Access Programs
Julia Schwartz, Rising 3L and Executive Topics and Comments Editor, University of Chicago Law Review

9:30 a.m.              Career Services and Public Interest          
Abbie Willard, Associate Dean for Career Services & Policy Initiatives
Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services

10:00 a.m.            Academic Policies and Resources
Roberto Koch, Registrar
Amy M. Gardner, Dean of Students
Sheri Lewis, Director of the D’Angelo Law Library and Lecturer in Law

10:45 a.m.            Break

11:00 a.m.            Overview of Transfer Programs/Office of the Dean of Students Programming/Wrap-Up

11:45 a.m.            Group Photo

12:00 p.m.            Lunch

12:30 p.m.            Bus Departs for Service Activity at the Greater Chicago Food Depository
Incoming transfer students, current students

1:00 p.m.              Service Activity at the Greater Chicago Food Depository

4:00 p.m.              Bus Departs Greater Chicago Food Depository to return to the Law School

4:45 p.m.              Bus arrives at the Law School
Dessert Social in the South Green Lounge
Sponsored by Themis Bar Review

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2Ls, 3Ls, LLMs

In-Class Exams:

Evidence – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Conflict of Laws – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

LLM Exams (a.m.) – 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

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Legislation and Statutory Interpretation – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

LLM Exams (p.m.) – 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

 

Take-Home Exams:

American Legal History: The Twentieth Century – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 22rd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 26th

Comparative Legal Institutions – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 22nd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 26th

Feminist Philosophy – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 22nd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 26th

Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication – Anytime between 8:00 a.m. beginning on Friday, May 22nd and 5:00 p.m. ending on Tuesday, May 26th

 

1Ls

In-Class Exams:

Evidence – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Conflict of Laws – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Legislation and Statutory Interpretation – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

 

Take-Home Exams:

American Legal History: The Twentieth Century – Monday, May 25th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

Comparative Legal Institutions – Monday, May 25th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

Feminist Philosophy – Monday, May 25th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication – Monday, May 25th between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ONLY!

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Monday, June 1st – Property

Helmholz – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Fennell – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

Wednesday, June 3rd – Criminal Law

Miles – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

McAdams – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

Friday, June 5th – Civil Procedure II

Casey – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Wood – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

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2L/3L classes that meet 3 times/week will not meet on this day.  This change will not affect 1L classes,
1L electives, or any class that meets fewer than 3 times/week during Spring Quarter.  Classes that will be affected are: American Law and the Rhetoric of Race, Banking Law, Bankruptcy and Reorganization: The Federal Bankruptcy Code, Business Organizations, Corporate Finance, Federal Courts, Federal Regulations of Securities, Insurance Law, Land Use, Legal Profession, Local Government Law, Patent Law, Public Choice, Taxation of Corporations II, and Telecommunications and Internet Law

2 Mar 2017 - 4:13pm
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Autumn 2014 Exam Period:

Wednesday, December 10th beginning at 8:00 a.m. through Tuesday, December 16th ending at 5:00 p.m.

2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs In – Class Exams (ALL):

JD morning exams begin at 9:00 a.m.

JD afternoon exams begin at 2:00 p.m.

LLM morning exams begin at 8:30 a.m.

LLM afternoon exams begin at 1:00 p.m.

2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs Take – Home Exams (ALL):

JD and LLM – may be started and must be finished anytime between 8:00 a.m., Wednesday, December 10th and 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 16th inclusive of the weekend.

1Ls:

Elements of the Law In – Class Exam – all sections begin at 9:00 a.m. Thursday, December 11th

Civil Procedure I Take – Home Exam – all sections begin at 8:00 a.m. and conclude at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, December 15th. Must be taken within 8 consecutive hours, but must be uploaded no later than 5:00 p.m. For example, if you begin at 8:00 a.m., your exam must be uploaded at 4:00 p.m. or if you begin your exam at 1:00 p.m., your exam must still be uploaded no later than 5:00 p.m.

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Thursday, August 4: Orientation Day 1

Please bring your laptop.

8:45 a.m. Registration

Please allow plenty of time to find parking if you plan to drive (the Law Lot will not be available) and to pick up your registration packet and t-shirt.

9:00 a.m.

Welcomes, Introductions
Thomas J. Miles, Dean, Clifton R. Musser Professor of Law and Economics
Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions & Financial Aid
Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students

9:30 a.m. Law School Information Tours and Library Overview
Shiva Jayaraman, Rising 3L and Editor-in-Chief, Chicago Journal of International Law
Michael Trajkovich, Rising 3L and Transfer Student Coordinator
Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services
Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach
10:30 a.m. UChicago Journals & Topic Access Programs
Carmel Dooling, Rising 3L and Executive Editor, University of Chicago Law Review

Shiva Jayaraman, Rising 3L and Editor-in-Chief, Chicago Journal of International Law
Nick Smith, Rising 3L and Topic Access Editor, The Legal Forum

10:45 a.m.

Law School Computing
David Blood, Manager of User Services 

11:15 a.m.

Financial Aid and LRAP
Kevin Petty, Associate Director of Admissions & Financial Aid 

11:30 a.m.

Career Services and Public Interest
Abbie Willard, Associate Dean, Office of Career Services
Susan J. Curry, Director, Public Interest Law and Policy 

12:00 p.m.

Lunch; Find Your Locker

1:45 p.m.

Trolley Departs for Service Activity

2:15 p.m.

Service Activity
Cornerstone Community Outreach, 4628 N Clifton Ave, Chicago, IL

Students will work with Cornerstone Community Outreach to sort donations. Please wear comfortable clothes. Jeans are recommended.

4:15 p.m.

Trolley Departs from Cornerstone Community Outreach to return to the Law School

4:45 p.m.

Trolley arrives at the Law School
Pizza Social in the South Green Lounge
Sponsored by Themis Bar Review

Friday, August 5: Orientation Day 2

You received a class t-shirt on Thursday that you should wear for the class picture.

8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast
Sponsored by External Affairs
Be sure to pick up a special gift from External Affairs

9:00 a.m.

Academic Policies and Resources
Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students
Office of the Registrar  

9:30 a.m.

Clerkships
Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services

10:00 a.m.

Addressing Gender-based Violence in our Community
Shea Wolfe, Deputy Title IX Coordinator

10:30 a.m.

An Introduction to Law & Economics
Douglas G. Baird, Harry A. Bigelow Distinguished Service Professor of Law

11:30 a.m.

Q&A Session
Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students
Lois Casaleggi, Senior Director, Office of Career Services
Michael Trajkovich, Rising 3L and Transfer Student Coordinator

12:15 p.m. Group Photo
Meet outside on the North side of the Reflecting Pool
Be sure to wear your class t-shirt today
12:30 p.m.

Lunch

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Thursday, September 15: Orientation Day 1

8:30 - 9:00 a.m.

Registration & Welcome Breakfast North Green Lounge

 Be sure to pick up your nametag, class t-shirt, and welcome bag.

9:00 - 9:45 a.m.

Welcomes and Introductions Auditorium

Ann K. Perry, Associate Dean for Admissions & Financial Aid

Thomas J. Miles, Dean, Clifton R. Musser Professor of Law and Economics, and Walter Mander Research Scholar

Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students                         

Richard Badger, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs

9:45 - 10:00 a.m.

Break

10:00 - 10:30 a.m.

Address on Professionalism Auditorium

Justice Mary L. Mikva, Illinois Appellate Court, First District

Introduction by Jonathan S. Masur, John P. Wilson Professor of Law, David and Celia Hilliard Research Scholar, and Director of the Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Program in Behavioral Law, Finance and Economics

10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Law School 101: What You Need to Know Auditorium

Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students

Abbie F. Willard Associate Dean of Career Services and Policy

Sky Emison, Rising 3L and Law Students Association President

11:30 - 12:00 p.m.

Addressing Gender-based Violence in Our Community – Auditorium 

Shea Wolfe, Deputy Title IX Coordinator

12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Lunch & Introduction to Public Interest and Pro Bono Green Lounge

Susan J. Curry, Director of Public Interest Law and Policy

Aican Nguyen, Director of International Programs                 

Nura Maznavi, Pro Bono Service Initiative Project Director

1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Faculty Perspectives on the Law School Classroom  Auditorium

William Baude, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Law

Emily Buss, Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of Law

Herschella G. Conyers, Clinical Professor of Law

William H.J. Hubbard, Professor of Law and Ronald H. Coase Teaching Scholar

Moderated by Shannon P. Bartlett, Dean of Students

2:00 - 2:15 p.m.

Break

Find your lockers

2:15 - 3:45 p.m.

Pro Bono Project Training Various rooms 

Your service assignment was sent to you via email.

3:45 - 4:00 p.m.

Class of 2019 Photo South Side of the Fountain

4:00 p.m.

Optional Law School ToursMeet at the “VCA” desk

Join rising 2Ls and 3Ls for a tour of the Law School.

Friday, September 16: Orientation Day 2

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Coffee MessNorth Green Lounge

10:00 - 10:45 a.m.

The Secrets to Law School Success Auditorium 

Elizabeth Kieff, MD

10:45 - 11:00 a.m.

Break

11:00 - 12:00 p.m.

Academic Counselors Present: What to Expect During Your First Class &Utilizing Campus Resources for a Successful 1L Year Auditorium

Michaela Kabat, ‘17

Matt Klomparens, ‘17

Shelby Klose, ‘17

Amanda Mayo, ‘17

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Lunch & Student Life Panel – North Green Lounge  

Amelia Garza-Mattia, ‘18

Hannah Gelbort, ‘18

Kathrine Gutierrez, ‘18

Amanda Johnson, ‘18

Sean Planchard, ‘18

1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

Optional Introduction to Law School Financial Aid Courtroom

Kevin Petty, Director of Admissions & Financial Aid

This session is optional and will be of most benefit to students who did not attend a financial aid presentation at ASW.

2:45 - 3:45 p.m.

Optional Computer & Library TrainingRoom III 

David Blood, Manager of User Services

Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services

Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach

2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Optional Campus Tours – Meet at the “VCA” (Law School reception desk)

Join rising 2Ls and 3Ls for a tour of campus dining options, the book store, and popular study spaces outside the Law School.

 

Optional Chicago Law Foundation T-shirt Sale – North Green Lounge

Purchase UChicago law gear with proceeds going to students working in public interest. Cash, check, or credit cards are accepted, although credit card transactions incur a small fee.

 

Optional GreenBooks Sale GreenBooks Room under the Auditorium 

 

Optional U-SHIP (The University of Chicago Student Health Insurance Plan) Presentation – Room V

 This session is optional and is intended for students with questions about U-SHIP.


More orientation events

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Monday, September 19: Kapnick Leadership Development Initiative Retreat

You will receive your schedule for the retreat when you arrive for check in on Monday, September 19.

7:30 - 8:00 a.m.

Arrival and Check in by Bigelow Section – Various

Bigelow Section A [Mink] (Bigelow Fellow: Feinstein): Room I

Bigelow Section B [Breckinridge] (Bigelow Fellow: Grunwald): Room III

Bigelow Section C [Hall] (Bigelow Fellow: Shapiro): Room IV 

Bigelow Section D [Currie] (Bigelow Fellow: Pollack): Room V

Bigelow Section E [Director] (Bigelow Fellow: Zambrano): Room D

Bigelow Section F [Lafontant] (Bigelow Fellow: Hafiz): Room F

Tuesday, September 20 - Friday, September 23: Kapnick Leadership Development Initiative Retreat

You will receive your schedule for this week when you check in on Monday morning.  You should plan on being occupied from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on these dates.

 


 

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Students from the Law School's International Immersion Program will be visiting Singapore in March. Please join Chicago Law alumni in welcoming them at a networking reception!

Kindly RSVP at here by Friday, March 10.

Please contact Ragan Memmott with any questions.

The Law School would like to thank Marshall Horowitz '92 for hosting this event.

2 Mar 2017 - 5:14pm
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Suppose a court holds in the context of a habeas petition that a constitutional right is not yet "clearly established." Can we conclude from this that the right does not exist? The answer, of course, is "no"-the court has only said that the right has not yet been explicitly recognized. Yet in case after case, spanning areas of law from habeas, to patent law, to evidence law, judges (and their clerks) make precisely these types of "deference mistakes": they rely on precedent without understanding the standard of review or burden of proof that governed that precedent.

5:30-6:00 p.m.: Registration
6:00-7:00 p.m.: Program
7:00-8:00 p.m.: Networking Reception

Kindly RSVP.

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Don't forget to note whether this event is open to the public, e.g. "This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited."

3 Mar 2017 - 5:43pm
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Don't forget to note whether this event is open to the public, e.g. "This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited."

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6 Mar 2017 - 1:57pm
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Please join us for this breakfast welcoming the Law School's newest admitted students. This is a great opportunity to meet and mingle with fellow alumni and to share your Chicago Law experience with prospective students.

RSVP to kerstin.wichmann@homburger.ch by March 10, 2017.

The Law School would like to thank Homburger and Daniel Daeniker LLM '96 for hosting this event.

6 Mar 2017 - 3:29pm
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The Big Data revolution is pushing the boundaries of law and jurisprudence. Various regulated activities are shifting from human to data-driven machine control governed by contractual platforms instead of licensing regimes. How should the law address this profound transition? Does Big data transform the law itself — lawyering, judging, lawmaking?

This symposium explores how data technologies are changing the fundamental nature of law, of the legal process, contracts, and of the activities law regulates. It examines the role that law can serve in regulating data driven activities and the relevance of existing justifications for regulation.

Among the issues explored in the symposium are:

  • Personalization of law and legal standards
  • Prediction-based law and machine learning
  • Crowdsourcing the law
  • Regulation of data-driven activity
  • Moral implications: privacy, autonomy, and equality


 

This is an international academic conference co-sponsored by the Coase-Sandor Instiute for Law and Economics.

Registration is required. Please register at https://goo.gl/forms/MRtk5u9dTI4bY1qr2

For all registration questions, please contact the team at Institut François Gény at ifg-contact@univ-lorraine.fr.

All other inquiries/questions, please contact Ms. Curtrice Scott, Coase-Sandor Institute, curtrice@uchicago.edu.


 
Schedule of Events

March 17, 2017 

Palais du Luxembourg
Salle Clémenceau
15 ter rue de vaugirard
75006, PARIS
8:40 Welcome Coffee (salle René Coty)

9:00 - 9:10 Welcome speech by Florence G’sell, Institut François Gény and Omri Ben-Shahar, University of Chicago Law School

9:10 - 9:30 Introduction by Guy Canivet, former Premier Président of Cour de Cassation and former member of the Constitutional Council
 
I. The Data Analytics Revolution
 
9:30-11:00 Understanding Behaviors with Data Analytics
 
Chair:  Christian  Licoppe,  Professor, Sociology of Information and Communication Technologies, Télécom ParisTech
  • Serge Abiteboul, Senior Researcher INRIA, Member of the French Academy of Sciences, Big Data and Human Sciences
  • Elizabeth Beasley, Head of CEPREMAP Well Being Observatory, "Using Google Trends to assess Well Being"
  • Jonathan S. Masur, Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School, Subjective Well-Being Data and Public Policy 
Coffee break
 
11:20- 13:00  Predictive Analytics and the Law
 
Chair: Laure Lavorel, VP Assistant General Counsel EMEA, CA Technologies, Administrator, Cercle Montesquieu 
  • Jacques Levy Vehel, Senior Researcher, INRIA, and Jerôme Dupré, magistrat (on leave of absence), "Using Data Analytics in Legal Risk Assessment"
  • Anup Malani, Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School, "Big Data and Prison Overcrowding"
  • Harold Epineuse, Researcher, IHEJ, "Predictive Justice?"
Lunch break
 
II. How Data Analytics will reshape the Law
 
14:30 – 16:15 « Personalized » Law
 
Chair: Jérôme Deroulez, Attorney, Member of the Paris Bar Incubator
  • Anthony J. Casey, Professor of Law, University of Chicago School of Law, "The End of Rules and Standards"
  • David Restrepo Amariles, Professor of law, HEC Paris, "Law’s Learning Algorithm: Making Rules Fit through Big Data"
  • Ariel Porat, Professor of Law, Tel Aviv University and Visiting Professor of Law, University of Chicago, "Personalized Negligence Law"
 
16:30 – 18:15 Towards a Machine Learning Driven Law?
 
Chair:Jean Lassègue, Researcher in Philogophy, EHESS/CNRS 
  • Florence G’sell, Professor of Law, University of Lorraine, Institut François Gény, "Automated Decision Making"
  • Grégory Lewkowicz, Professor of Law, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Perelman Center, Back to Leibniz: Smart Law & Algorithmic Regulations

Final Remarks by Jeroen Luchtenberg, Attorney at Law (Paris and New York)

March 18, 2017 

 Maison du Barreau
Auditorium
2, rue de Harlay
75001, PARIS

 
III. How Data Analytics will Affect Individuals
 
9:00-9:20  Welcome Coffee
 
9:20-9:30  Welcome Speech, by Hannelore Schmidt, Attorney at Law, Member of the Paris Bar Incubator
 
9:30-11:00 Big Data and Consumers  
Chair: Ricardo Cortes-Monroy, Senior VP and Group General Counsel, Nestlé
  • Omri Ben-Shahar, Professor of Law and Kearney Director of the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics, University of Chicago, "Interpreting Contracts Via Surveys and Experiments"
  • Anne-Lise Sibony, Professor of European Law, University of Louvain, "Protecting Consumers Against Unfair Use of Data: The Perspective of EU Consumer Law"
  • Célia Zolynski, Professor of Law, UVSQ/Paris-Saclay, Member of the Conseil National du Numérique, Big Data and Consumer Law: Regulating Online Platforms
Coffee break
 
11:15 – 13:00  Big Data and Citizens: Privacy and Ethics (roundtable)
Chair: Béatrice Delmas Linel, Managing Partner, Osborne Clarke
  • Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, Researcher, MIT MediaLab/Imperial College, Big Data and Artificial Intelligence: How to Protect Privacy?
  • Edouard Geffray, Secretary General of CNIL, Dealing with Ethics and Privacy in the European Union
  • Héléna Pons-Charlet, Head of Legal, Digital Crimes Unit, Microsoft, The Fourth Industrial Revolution,  Artificial Intelligence as an Opportunity for Future Welfare 
  • Laure Lavorel, VP Assistant General Counsel EMEA, CA Technologies, Administrator, Cercle Montesquieu, The Key Role of Cybersecurity
This is an international academic conference. The event is free and open to the public, but registration via  https://goo.gl/forms/MRtk5u9dTI4bY1qr2 is required.
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8 Mar 2017 - 3:55pm
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We will be recognizing all graduating students who have completed the Pro Bono Pledge by completing at least 50 hours of supervised volunteer legal work that helps to meet the legal needs of persons of limited means, to promote access to justice, or to serve the public good.

Featured speaker: John Knight '88, Director LGBT and HIV Project, ACLU-Illinois

The University of Chicago Law School Pro Bono Service Initiative reflects the principle that members of the legal profession and those aspiring to enter the legal profession have an obligation to provide law-related services to individuals, groups, or causes that are underrepresented in the legal system.

Lunch will be served

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10 Mar 2017 - 11:25am
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The Long Reach of the Sixties:
LBJ, Nixon, and the Making of the Contemporary Supreme Court

Featuring Laura Kalman,
Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Laura Kalman focuses on the period between 1965 and 1971, when Presidents Johnson and Nixon launched the most ambitious effort to control the Court since Franklin Roosevelt tried to pack it with additional justices.  She roots their efforts to mold the Court in their desire to protect their Presidencies, and she sets them within the broader context of a struggle between the executive, judicial and legislative branches of government.  The battles that ensued transformed the meaning of the Warren Court in American memory by calcifying its image as “activist” and “liberal” ;  changed the Court itself as an institution; and have  haunted—indeed scarred—the contemporary Supreme Court appointments process. 

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13 Mar 2017 - 4:49pm
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"Reassessing the State and Local Government Toolkit" will be held at the Law School on June 18–20, 2009. This conference is being organized by Richard Epstein, Lee Fennell, and Julie Roin and is jointly sponsored by the University of Chicago Law School John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics and the University of Chicago Law Review.

The conference will focus on the legal, political and economic implications of various techniques that are (or that might be) used by states and localities to achieve economic and social ends.  Participants will address questions arising in contexts ranging from economic development to education to land use to housing policy.  Conference papers will be published in a symposium issue of the University of Chicago Law Review.

Participants include:

  • Vicki L. Been, NYU School of Law
  • Christopher R. Berry, The Harris School, University of Chicago
  • Richard Briffault, Columbia Law School
  • David A. Dana, Northwestern University School of Law
  • William A. Fischel, Dartmouth College
  • Nicole Garnett, Notre Dame Law School
  • Jacob Gersen, University of Chicago Law School
  • Clayton Gillette, NYU School of Law
  • Roderick M. Hills, Jr., NYU School of Law
  • Thomas W. Merrill, Yale Law School
  • Richard C. Schragger, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Christopher Serkin, Brooklyn Law School

Schedule

Friday, June 19

 

8:00–8:30 Continental Breakfast

8:30–8:45 Welcome/ Introduction

8:45–9:35 Neither "Creatures of the State" nor "Accidents of Geography": The Consolidation of American Public School Districts in the Twentieth Century
William A. Fischel

9:35–10:25 Affordable Private Education and the Middle Class City
Nicole Garnett

10:25–10:40 Break

10:40–11:30 The Past and Future of Local Industrial Policy
Richard C. Schragger

11:30–12:20 Henry George’s Revenge: The Steep Costs of Using Non-Cumulative Zoning to Preserve Land for Urban Manufacturing
Roderick Hills

12:20–2:00 Lunch

2:00–2:50 Entrenching Environmentalism: Private Conservation Easements Over Public Land
Christopher Serkin

2:50–3:40 Community Benefit Agreements: A New Local Government Tool or Another Variation on the Exactions Theme?
Vicki Been

3:40–3:55 Break

3:55–4:45 The Timing of Elections
Christopher R. Berry and Jacob E. Gersen

4:45–5:35 Controlling Residential Stakes
Lee Anne Fennell and Julie Roin

Saturday, June 20

8:30–8:45 Continental Breakfast

8:45–9:35 Who Should Authorize a Commuter Tax?
Clayton Gillette

9:35–10:25 How to Undermine Tax Increment Financing: The Lessons of ProLogis v. City of Chicago
Richard A. Epstein

10:25–10:40 Break

10:40–11:30 Overcoming Local Tragic Choices by Voting
Thomas Merrill

11:30–12:20 The Most Popular Tool: Tax Increment Financing and Local Government
Richard Briffault

12:20 Box Lunch

Abstracts

Community Benefit Agreements: A New Local Government Tool or Another Variation on the Exactions Theme?
Vicki Been
    A community benefits agreement ("CBA") results from negotiations between a developer proposing a particular land use and a coalition of community organizations that claims to represent the individuals and groups affected by the proposed development (or seeks to do so). In a typical CBA, community members agree to support the developer’s proposed project, or at least promise not to oppose the project or to invoke procedural devices or legal challenges that might delay or derail the project. In return, the developer agrees to provide to the community such benefits as assurances of local jobs, affordable housing and environmental improvements.
    CBAs are a relatively recent phenomenon across the United States, although they grow out of a long history of negotiations among developers, land use authorities and public officials, and the affected community and/or various stakeholder groups (such as environmental groups or organized labor) over development proposals that require governmental approval. The first major CBA, the Los Angeles Staples agreement, was signed in 2001. Since then, at scores of CBAs have been negotiated across the country.
    Given the rising popularity of CBAs, it is important to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of these agreements in light of both the experience of parties who have entered into CBAs (albeit limited) and more theoretical concerns about the impact that CBAs may have on the processes of land use regulation and real estate development. Those theoretical concerns are grounded in a long history of efforts by communities, developers, and local governments to find flexible ways to address neighbors’ concerns about development proposals. Conditional rezonings, development agreements, negotiated exactions, conditional negative declarations in environmental impact review, and compensated siting agreements between industries needing to develop locally undesirable land uses ("LULUs") and host communities have been used for decades. The debates about, and experiences under, such progenitors of CBAs offer important insights into the possible advantages and disadvantages of CBAs.
    This essay begins by briefly summarizing the structure, history, and political and legal context of CBAs. Part II evaluates the benefits and drawbacks various stakeholders perceive CBAs to offer or threaten. Part III surveys some of the thorny legal and policy questions presented by CBAs. Part IV argues that local governments should avoid the use of CBAs in the land use process, and should recognize CBAs in economic development processes that will be intertwined with land use approvals only after adopting various constraints designed to ensure their transparency, representativeness, consistency with the local government’s jurisdiction-wide priorities, and enforceability.

 The Timing of Elections 
Christopher R. Berry and Jacob E. Gersen 
The timing of local government elections varies enormously in the United States. Many local political institutions hold elections simultaneously with other local, state, or federal elections. Others, however, do not coordinate at all or take steps to ensure that elections are held at different times. Citizens in some localities face the specter of local government elections in eleven months of the year and the legal regimes regulating electoral timing are no less varied. This essay argues that electoral timing is consequential for democratic theory and practice. Empirically, we shows that off-cycle elections—elections occurring at odd times during the year or during years in which there is no major state or federal election—produce systematically lower turnout. This reduction in turnout is unlikely to be randomly distributed across the pool of potential voters, as the essay illustrates with a simple formal model. Because off-cycle elections increase the costs of political participation, voters with more at stake will tend to participate in off-cycle elections, while those with less at stake will not. Put differently, the timing of elections can produce selective participation that drives the influence of special interests on electoral outcomes. To evaluate this theory, we analyze the impact of electoral timing on substantive policy outcomes. By virtue of a 1980s change in the California Election Code, school boards were given the option of changing their elections from off-cycle to on cycle. Consistent with the selective participation effect, special interests are less well off in on-cycle election districts. Turnout is systematically lower and teacher salaries are systematically higher when school district elections are held off-cycle. Against this backdrop, we consider alternative legal regimes for regulating the timing of local government elections.

The Most Popular Tool: Tax Increment Financing and Local Government
Richard Briffault
Tax increment financing (TIF) is both the most widely used and the most controversial local government program for financing economic development in the United States. Although TIF’s role in financing Kelo-style takings has gotten the most attention, most TIF plans do not involve eminent domain, and most of the legal and political battles over TIF have had little to do with takings. This paper considers why TIF has become so widespread and what the debate about TIF tells us about the state of American local government.  TIF succeeds – in the sense of its ubiquitous adoption and use – because it maps precisely on to the principal features of contemporary local government. So, too, TIF is controversial because it exacerbates some of the basic tensions in our local government structure and policies. The paper explores four key features of TIF that resonate closely with out local government system – decentralization, the fiscalization of local policy, interlocal conflict, and entrepreneurial development policies. It suggests that major changes that would restrict TIF are unlikely unless the local government setting to which TIF is so well adapted changes as well.

The Foreclosure Crisis and the Anti-Fragmentation Principle in State Property Law
David Dana 
We are in the midst of a massive foreclosure crisis that has its roots, in part, in the over-fragmentation of property. Secured credit in homes has been divided and over-divided and spun into so many separate interests that economically rational, socially beneficial modifications of loans are impossible. The mortgage story is a new one but the excessive fragmentation of property and the creation of waste and inefficiency is not new. Our legal tradition has an answer, in the form of an anti-fragmentation principle, which is implicit in our estate law doctrines and in state oil and gas unitization statutes. Consistent with this principle, federal government trustees should be authorized to review troubled mortgages and, where modification would yield greater total return than foreclosure, modify the loans. Blind trustee review can be achieved without formal condemnations of property interests or the creation of government liability for regulatory takings.

 

How to Undermine Tax Increment Financing: The Lessons of ProLogis v. City of Chicago
Richard A. Epstein
The purpose of my paper is to examine the level of constitutional protection that is afforded to the complex set of rights that local governments offer to outside lenders who finance public improvements in tax increment finance districts. The standard devices do not  provide traditional liens against any particular asset because to do so would be to abandon the tax exempt status of the municipal bonds  that are issued. Yet at the same token they do provide extensive protections against the local governments that insure that these obligations will be repaid in all events, which allow these bonds to  trade in ordinary markets. And local governments normally covenant  to pay these bonds in the event that they no longer continue to use the public improvements in question. The bonds may, however, be  vulnerable to loss when local public improvements are subject to condemnation by governments that operate outside their home territory, as proved the case in Chicago v. Prologis, now before the  Illinois Supreme Court. My purpose is to defend the proposition that these complex interests should be treated as property under the takings clause and not simply as a mere expectation devoid of constitutional protection. The examination of this topic opens the way for a larger consideration of the difficult question of valuation under the takings clause, and how property should be understood under  the takings clause in light of the powerful public choice considerations that tend to reduce or eliminate its protection.

Controlling Residential Stakes
Lee Anne Fennell and Julie Roin
The paper examines whether, how, and why local governments might get involved in regulating or shaping the financial stakes that residents have in their homes.  The idea that residents can have too small a stake has been brought home by rashes of foreclosures and abandonments, and also relates to longstanding questions about the effects of renters and owner-occupants, respectively, on a communityHowever, recent scholarship has also pointed out problems that arise when residents have too great a financial stake in their homes (e.g., the NIMBYism of Fischel's homevoters).  The question is whether local governments can identify a more desirable intermediate position and help members of their communities move towards it. Local governments might regulate problematic forms of stakeholding, or affirmatively foster intermediate stakeholding arrangements (whether through limited equity homeownership arrangements or revised leasehold forms).  More radically, local governments might experiment with regionalism carried out through shared equity arrangements in which local homeowners hold stakes in the housing markets of surrounding localities.

 

Neither "Creatures of the State" nor "Accidents of Geography": The Consolidation of American Public School Districts in the Twentieth Century
William A. Fischel
American public school districts numbered more than 200,000 in 1910. By 1970 there were fewer than 20,000. The decline was almost entirely accounted for by the consolidation of one-room, rural schools, into larger school districts. Education leaders had long urged districts to consolidate, and the record of their efforts leaves the widely-accepted impression that the state government caused the consolidation. My story is that consolidation was demand driven. Local residents had to approve consolidation. They voted to do so, I argue, only after high-school education became widespread. Graduates of one-room schools found it difficult to get into high school. Rural districts that were not "making the grade" were unattractive to home and farm buyers, and the threat of reduced property values induced voters to agree to consolidate. 

 

Affordable Private Education and the Middle Class City
Nicole Garnett
Although central-city fortunes improved during the last decade-and-a-half, most large urban centers continue to lose families with children, especially middle-class families. These losses are troubling because there are reasons to believe that middle-class families are a cornerstone of urban health—especially the undisputed connection between residential tenure, homeownership, and social capital. This Essay focuses on the centrality of quality educational options—including affordable private schools—to the goals of building and sustaining a middle-class city. Without question, public-school quality strongly influences parents’ residential decisions: Not only do concerns about urban public schools draw many families to the suburbs, but many parents who choose urban life also choose to invest in private education for their children. Private schools, however, are not an option for many middle-class families: The average tuition at a non-religious private high school in the U.S. is $17,413, more than one-third of the median household income. In light of this financial reality, this Essay suggests that—along with emphasizing public-school reforms, including charter and magnet schools—state and local governments should consider using tax policy to help make private schools accessible to those of modest means. Specifically, the Essay suggests that programs granting tax credits for donations to nonprofit scholarship organizations, which are already in place in several states, can be used to unbundle residential and educational decisions by increasing both the affordability and diversity of educational options available to middle-class parents.

 

Who Should Authorize a Commuter Tax?
Clayton P. Gillette
A few cities around the United States impose a commuter tax—a tax on income earned within the city by nonresidents. Perhaps more cities would do so if they had the requisite legal authority. But cities are creatures of the states of which they are political subdivisions and legal doctrine requires that they receive either state legislative or constitutional approval before exercising authority. States have jealously guarded their prerogatives over the taxing power. Even many states that grant constitutional home rule to their cities except the taxing power from those grants. Perhaps there is nothing surprising about this state of affairs with respect to commuter taxes. After all, the natural stopping point for the exercise of unrestricted local authority is legislation that imposes significant externalities. Since, by definition, the commuter tax falls on nonresidents, the predicate of external effects appears to be satisfied. Nevertheless, in this Article I argue that, as a general principle, the decision to tax should be allocated to that level of government that is best positioned to balance the social costs and benefits of the proposed exaction. Perhaps more controversially, I then argue that it is the city that imposes the tax rather than the state that traditionally authorizes it that occupies that position. Thus, I will tentatively conclude that cities should be entitled to authorize the imposition of a commuter tax without prior state authorization.

 

Henry George’s Revenge: The Steep Costs of Using Non-Cumulative Zoning to Preserve Land for Urban Manufacturing
Roderick Hills
Since 1961, New York City has used non-cumulative zones to reserve land exclusively for manufacturing.  Other cities have followed suit:  Chicago, for instance, uses "planned manufacturing districts" to retain industry in the Clybourn, Goose Island, and Elston corridors.  All such non-cumulative zones serve the purpose of preventing developers of residential users from competing against manufacturers for urban land on the theory that the former will often outbid the latter when high-end urban housing is more profitable than industrial uses.  Advocates of non-cumulative zones argue that the high-wage jobs of manufacturing enterprises ought not to be crowded out of the city by more profitable residential uses. 
      This essay examines whether such a zoning strategy is a sensible way to retain manufacturing within the city.  The essay assumes that cities might properly want to subsidize urban manufacturing under certain circumstances – for instance, to protect low-income neighborhoods from welfare losses or promote certain agglomeration spillover benefits from concentrating different industries within a single municipality.  Are non-cumulative zones a good way to accomplish this goal compared to tax subsidies or direct budget outlays?   
      The essay argues that non-cumulative zones are a particularly inefficient way of inducing manufacturing enterprises to stay within the city for three reasons.  First, such zones typically do not require any industrial activity level as a condition for zoning protection.  Therefore, non-cumulative zones can lead to under-utilized land – e.g., abandoned or under-occupied warehouses – that neither supply jobs nor agglomeration economies to the city, at the cost of tax base and housing opportunities.  Second, non-cumulative zones are inalienable entitlements that manufacturers cannot forego.  Therefore, they have the potential to inflict higher deadweight loss than tax subsidies or direct budget outlays whenever the spread between the price of residential and industrial uses of land exceeds the value of the manufacturing enterprise to the city.  Third, the subsidy delivered to manufacturers by non-cumulative zones is not very visible to the public, making this mechanism prone to abuse by small groups of developers, unions, or manufacturers even when the benefits of the proposed or existing manufacturing uses to the city as a whole are dubious.  Well-connected developers, for instance, can use such zones to exclude competition for buildable residential land, massaging their connections to re-zone the land while insuring that rival builders do not have access to developable urban land.   
      Rather than being a sensible means for subsidizing industry, this essay suggests that non-cumulative zones might better serve the function of allowing the city to capture rents resulting from the conversion of land from low-value industrial uses to higher-value residential uses.  Taxing away this extra value might raise revenue for a wide variety of purposes (including subsidies for industries with spillover benefits) with minimal excess burden.  In order for non-cumulative zones to serve this purpose, however, the city needs a visible and expeditious way to re-zone the land without (a)  leaving too much money on the table for the developer or (b) leaving land in an over-regulated state for too long a period of time because of neighborhood opposition to conversion.  My tentative normative proposal is that up-zoned land be subject to a special "Georgist" windfall tax (basically, a higher rate on the extra increment of value to the lot from the upzoning) and that the revenue from this tax be used for industrial retention (or whatever -- affordable housing, etc) to buy off neighborhood, manufacturer, or union opposition to the re-zoning.

 

Overcoming Local Tragic Choices by Voting
Thomas W. Merrill
Disputes about the provision of local public goods have often been resolved by voting among affected property owners. Special assessment districts, local zoning referenda, and business improvement districts are examples. In this paper, I consider whether voting by property owners can be used to resolve certain local disputes that entail "tragic choices," by which I mean decisions that entail tradeoffs between incommensurate values and hence have no demonstrably right answer. The central case I have in mind is a dispute over whether to use eminent domain to facilitate local economic development – an issue that has elicited intense controversy and has produced disparate results when considered by courts, legislatures, and in state-wide voter initiatives. 
   To anchor the discussion, I describe a recent episode in which voting by property owners was used to resolve a neighborhood controversy in New Haven Connecticut. The question was whether the Saint Ronan/Edgehill area, a residential neighborhood consisting of some 250 properties, would be declared an historic preservation district. The issue involve a tragic choice as I define the term: proponents of the measure cited concerns about tear downs and institutional encroachment into the neighborhood; opponents invoked homeowner autonomy and the costs of bureaucratic oversight. A study report was prepared, public meetings held, and neighbors engaged in door-to-door lobbying on behalf of competing positions. Pursuant to local law, the matter was put to a vote by secret ballot, with a two-thirds majority of homes required for approval. A majority voted against the proposal – a result that was apparently regarded as legitimate by all.
   There are a number of features of the Saint Ronan/Edgehill dispute which may make it difficult to replicate in other contexts. The neighborhood is demographically homogenous, the residents are highly educated, many are otherwise active in civic affairs, and turnover is low. I contend, however, that three structural features of the dispute were critical in making voting the appropriate decisional tool for resolving a dispute with no demonstrably correct answer. First, both the costs and the benefits of the proposed historic preservation district would have been borne by the homeowners, with few external effects. Second, the dispute entailed uniform high stakes; every homeowner would be affected in roughly equal measure, and the effect was likely to be significant. Third, there were no informational distortions in the form of advertising or lobbying by interest groups outside the community. Given these features, resolving the dispute by voting among affected owners was probably better than any other decisional tool that can be imagined.
   Whether the Saint Ronan/Edgehill voting model can be extended to other local tragic choices like economic development takings is uncertain. Economic development takings, like historic preservation, generate controversy over predictive judgments and valuations of outcomes as to which there are no clearly right answers, and in that sense there is a direct parallel. The structural features contain similarities and differences. On the one hand, economic development takings, like historic preservation, generate benefits and costs that are largely internal to the locality where the takings occur. Similarly, it is unlikely that interest groups outside the community will be motivated in the ordinary case to attempt to distort the flow of information about the issue. On the other hand, economic development takings, unlike historic preservation, do not impose uniform high stakes on all affected property owners. Some owners – those whose property is taken – are presumably net losers, whereas as other property owners – those whose property is untouched – are presumably net winners (assuming the economic development project succeeds). 
   Nevertheless, I argue that if certain conditions are met – such as requiring that the funds to compensate the owners whose property is taken be raised from taxes imposed on those whose property in untouched – it may be appropriate to resolve disputes over local economic development takings by voting among affected property owners. Given the failure of courts, legislatures, and voter initiatives to reach consistent judgments about the propriety of economic development takings, allowing such tragic choices to be resolved by local voting would seem to be an appropriate subject for experimentation.

The Past and Future of Local Industrial Policy
Richard C. Schragger
Scholars of local government tend to assume that policy-makers can exert some influence over city well-being. More specifically, the literature assumes that government policies—either at the federal, state, or local level—can influence local economic growth and decline, the most important determinant of a city’s health. This connection between policy and local economic outcomes implies a theory of how cities form and grow, however, and legal scholars have not adequately articulated such a theory. Without an account of how cities develop, we are left to assume that generally good policies will induce growth in the economy and generally bad policies will induce decline. But this is an assumption. If cities do not have much control over their economies than government policy is not particularly relevant to urban outcomes.

This Essay first argues that we need a better (and more self-conscious) account of city formation and local economic growth. The Essay then tests our intuitions about the relationship between policy and economic development by considering a number of explanations for why cities have resurged over the last fifteen to twenty years. Finally, the Essay contrasts two economic development policies that have been adopted in New York City—one that preceded the current financial crisis and one that followed it. The first policy involved location subsidies for a large financial services employer. The second policy involves retraining financial service workers and subsidizing small, start-up ventures. Whether either approach works depends significantly on one’s theory about how city economic development happens. I contend that we do not know enough to be able to predict how one policy or another will affect city growth and decline.

Entrenching Environmentalism: Private Conservation Easements Over Public Land
Christopher Serkin
Anti-entrenchment rules generally prevent local governments from making enforceable precommitments around land use policy. A local government cannot pass an unrepealable zoning ordinance, for example. Nevertheless, driven by local demand, local governments have found various ways around this prohibition by relying on private law mechanisms to create obligations binding in the future. This Essay examines conservation easements as one such tool. In particular, the Essay focuses on an example from Vermont in which a town is in the process of conveying conservation easements over property it owns to a private conservation group. This mechanism functions like an unrepealable ordinance that prohibits the property from being developed, limited only by the government’s ability to condemn the easements back. The Essay examines the benefits and potential costs of precommitting to conservation in this way, including the substantial risks of political malfunction. It then canvasses other forms of private law precommitments -- entering contracts, conveying property, issuing debt -- and finds protections built into each of these that either limit governments’ power to use them in the first place, or create safety valves to release governments later on. The Essay ultimately argues for similar protection from conservation easements. When governments take conservation easements over public land through eminent domain, and they should be given the option of paying the fair market value of the easements on the date the easements were created, instead of their market value on the date of the condemnation. This limits the extent of entrenchment to the value of the development rights when the conservation easements were conveyed away.

 

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15 Mar 2017 - 9:41am
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Geoffrey Stone, leading constitutional scholar and author of Sex and the Constitution, traces the evolution of legal and moral codes that have attempted to legislate issues as explosive and divisive as abortion, same-sex marriage, pornography, and contraception, from the ancient world to today. Michael Gerhardt, scholar-in-residence at the National Constitution Center, moderates.

Details and tickets

Video livestream

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17 Mar 2017 - 1:02pm
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Join your fellow classmates for an informational session on the art of dance. Participants will receive a Wellness T-shirt.

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20 Mar 2017 - 10:34am
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Help low income legal permanent residents apply to become citizens! Instituto Del Progreso Latino  will be hosting a training at the law school for students interested in volunteering at a citizenship workshop at the Mexican Consulate on Saturday, April 1st from 9:00am-1:00pm. Spanish is not required. 

Box lunches from Bombay Wraps Lunch will be served.

20 Mar 2017 - 10:53am
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In his new book Sex and the Constitution, legal scholar and CHF favorite Geoffrey Stone explores the historical evolutions of religious, social, and legal approaches to sex and the surprising role American constitutional law has played in contemporary debates over all manner of sexual mores: obscenity, contraception, abortion, and homosexuality. These issues have been at the core of what Stone deems a “constitutional revolution,” and will likely remain controversial topics under the new administration and the current—and future—line-up on the Supreme Court. Don’t miss this wide-ranging conversation on the past, present, and future of sex, the role of the Court, and the evolution of constitutional law.

Details and registration

20 Mar 2017 - 11:10am
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Prof. Garoupa will be presenting his paper "Judging in Europe: Do Legal Traditions Matter?"

Open to the public. Paper available at the Judicial Behavior Workshop webpage.

20 Mar 2017 - 12:00pm
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One of our leading constitutional scholars, Stone is the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago and author of the multi-award winning Perilous Times, a groundbreaking history of the abridgement of First Amendment rights in wartime. In his second book, Stone traces the history of efforts to manage sexual behavior with legislation, something that the founders, by separating church and state, meant to rule out. Their Enlightenment values, however, were challenged by late 19th-century laws banning pornography, contraception, and abortion. More clashes between sexual freedom and sexual morality followed in later decades, and Stone tracks the debate as it played out in major High Court cases such as Griswold v. Connecticut, Roe v. Wade, and Obergefell v. Hodges.

This event is free to attend with no reservation required. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis. Click here for more information.

20 Mar 2017 - 12:48pm
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How have attitudes toward contraception and abortion evolved over time? How has the Supreme Court come to play a central role in defining these fundamental rights of American citizens? And what is the future of these rights with the prospect of a possible succession of Donald Trump appointments to the Supreme Court?

Drawing from his new book, Sex and the Constitution, legal scholar Geoffrey R. Stone, JD’71, traces the complex and fascinating relationship between sex, religion, and law from the ancient world to the present.

6:00 p.m.  Registration and networking
6:30 p.m.  Presentation and discussion
7:30 p.m.  Reception

$20/person
$10/recent graduate (College alumni of the past 10 years and graduate alumni of the past five years)
Free for UChicago graduates from the current academic year
Two complimentary registrations for members of the Chicago, Harper, Phoenix, and Medical and Biological Sciences Alumni Association philanthropic societies

Register for this event here.

20 Mar 2017 - 12:49pm
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Modern Islamic finance, in which financial activity strives to adhere to the principles of Islamic law, is a rapidly growing global industry valued at roughly $2 trillion.

Legal scholar Cynthia Shawamreh, JD’88, will explore the basic principles and practices of modern Islamic finance. 

6:00 p.m.  Registration and networking
6:30 p.m.  Presentation and discussion
7:30 p.m.  Reception

$20/person
$10/recent graduate (College alumni of the past 10 years and graduate alumni of the past five years)
Free for UChicago graduates from the current academic year
Two complimentary registrations for members of the Chicago, Harper, Phoenix, and Medical and Biological Sciences Alumni Association philanthropic societies

Please RSVP here.

20 Mar 2017 - 12:56pm
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Author Geoffrey R. Stone talks about his new book, “Sex and the Constitution,” which chronicles the epic story of how sex came to be legislated in America.

The book explores how two centuries of American law have imposed regulations over contraception, abortion, obscenity and sodomy, and looks ahead to future fights in a battle-worn Supreme Court, as justices navigate profoundly divisive yet vital issues.

“Sex and the Constitution” shows how our sexual mores sprang not only from Enlightenment-era revolutionaries, but extend further back to Judeo-Christian beliefs about sex, sin and shame.

A book signing will follow the program. RSVP here.

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23 Mar 2017 - 2:00pm
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The International Law Society 

presents

International Arbitration | An Overview & Practical Guidance

Featuring: Agustin Sanz and Hugh Carlson, Three Crowns LLP, Washington, D.C.

MONDAY, April 10

Room V

Lunch provided

Join Three Crowns attorneys Mr. Agustin Sanz and Mr. Hugh Carlson in a lunchtime conversation about international arbitration.  Hugh and Agustin will provide an overview of this practice, offer some practical guidance on breaking into the field, and describe how the UChicago economic emphasis can be of value to students’ considering joining this practice.

Mr. Sanz is a senior associate at Three Crowns, and focuses on comparative public and international law from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as valuation in international arbitration.  He holds a JD degree from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), an LLM from the University of Chicago and is currently a JSD candidate at the Law School.  He has extensive experience of both international commercial and investment treaty arbitrations involving disputes in a broad range of sectors.

Mr. Carlson is the Director of Practice at Three Crowns, in which capacity he maintains an active practice in international dispute resolution and serves in a leadership role at the firm.  He has extensive practice experience in international commercial and investment treaty arbitration.  He is an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law, from which he also holds a JD.

Both Agustin and Hugh are lecturers in the Harvard Law School workshop Damages in International Arbitration.

Note: This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

23 Mar 2017 - 3:41pm
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This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

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24 Mar 2017 - 3:09pm
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In contrast to a Chicago’s Best Ideas where completed work is presented, a paper that is in the preliminary stages will be presented by Professor Baude to a small group of students.

Following the short presentation, a group discussion will follow.  Students will be asked to give feedback and commentary on the paper that was presented. Participating students will have the benefit of experiencing the academic writing process and engaging in academic discussion.   

Each participant will receive a copy of the paper one week in advance of the program. Participants are to read the draft of the paper being presented and come prepared with a few questions and comments.

Only twelve slots are available for this event, and they will be filled on a first come, first serve basis.  After signing up, you will receive an email from Candace Bergeron (cbergeron@uchicago.edu) with event details and procedures if space is available. Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP for this event at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/MiniWIP4/3   

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27 Mar 2017 - 8:53am
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The Skadden Fellowships allow graduates to design their dream public interest jobs. These two-year fellowships fund work in civil legal services for clients living in poverty. Susan Plum, the Executive Director of the Fellowships, will be video-conferencing with students to explain the program and answer your questions. Don’t miss the opportunity to find out about these prestigious fellowships and get tips on how to create a strong application. This is an essential program for all students interested in public interest work

To RSVP, go to: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/skaddeninfosession



27 Mar 2017 - 8:55am
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If you are considering applying for a public interest fellowship after graduation or after a judicial clerkship, please join us for this program.  The program will cover types of fellowships, timeline considerations, available resources, and tips for navigating the process. This program is primarily for 2Ls, as well as 3Ls with clerkships, but 1Ls who are interested in public interest fellowships are welcome to attend.  [Lunch Provided]

To RSVP, got to: http://www.law.uchicago.edu/PGFsession

27 Mar 2017 - 2:50pm
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The Uneasy Case for Product Liability by A. Mitchell Polinsky, Stanford Law School

27 Mar 2017 - 2:51pm
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"Tying in Two-Sided Markets, with Application to Google"

Ed Iacobucci, Professor of Law, Associate Dean Research & Osler Chair in Business Law, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

27 Mar 2017 - 2:51pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

27 Mar 2017 - 3:05pm
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The University of Chicago Law School is proud to present the 2006 Ronald Coase Lecture in Law and Economics. The 2006 Coase Lecture will be delivered by Lior Strahilevitz, Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School,  on Tuesday, January 24, 2006. The topic of the lecture is "Information Asymmetries and the Rights to Exclude." The lecture will take place at 4:00 pm in the Weymouth Kirkland Courtroom of the University of Chicago Law School.  All are welcome. Questions may be directed to Marsha Nagorsky.

Download a PDF of the 2006 Coase Lecture

27 Mar 2017 - 3:07pm
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Sponsored by the Center for Law, Philosophy & Human Values at the University of Chicago Law School

Where did our "morality"-- our moral sense, our moral intuitions, our dispositions to make particular kinds of moral judgments--come from?  And does its origin have any bearing on the value,  justification, or credibility of our morality?

Supernatural explanations for our moral sense are no longer credible, so in the modern era, we have tried to understand what role culture, psychology, biology, and economic circumstances have played in the development of our morality.   Hume in the 18th-century and Nietzsche in the 19th-century pioneered the genre of histories of morality, though it has been another 19th-century thinker, Darwin, whose own tentative ideas about the evolutionary origins of our moral sense that have been particularly influential in much recent work in the social sciences concerned with morality.   Hume and Darwin saw moral genealogies as playing a kind of vindicatory role for our moral sense, while Nietzsche conceived of moral genealogy as serving a critical purpose.   How can such genealogies do either?

In the last twenty years, there has been a robust and renewed interest in moral genealogies among philosophers and social scientists.   Anthropology, psychology, and biology have all provided resources for our contemporary genealogists of morality, who see the correct understanding of the origins of our moral sense as sometimes supporting a radical moral relativism on one extreme, and sometimes supporting the idea of an "innate" moral sense at the other.

The first day of the conference will be devoted to exploring the historical figures concerned with genealogies of morality:  Hume, Nietzsche, and Darwin-and their intellectual interactions, affinities, and differences.  The second day will present some of the best contemporary practitioners of moral genealogy.  Participation at this conference is by invitation only. .  If you have any questions about this event, please contact Brian Leiter (bleiter@uchicago.edu).

Recordings

“Genealogy and Morality”
Speaker:    Michael N. Forster (Chicago)
Commentator:  Nir Ben Moshe (Chicago)

“Hume and the Genealogy of Morality”
Speaker:  Peter Kail (Oxford)
Commentator:  Guy Elgat (Northwestern)
 
“Evolutionary Ethics:  Contra Nietzsche and Contemporaries”
Speaker:  Robert J. Richards (Chicago)
Commentator:  Nicholas Koziolek (Chicago)

“Altrusim and Morality:  No Necessary Connection”
Speaker:  Daniel Batson (Kansas)
Commentator:  Martha Nussbaum (Chicago)

“The Genealogy of Morals” (chapter 6 of The Emotional Construction of Morals)
Speaker:  Jesse Prinz (CUNY Grad Center)
Commentator:  Agnes Callard (Chicago)

 

Speakers and Commentators

C. Daniel Batson is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Kansas.

Nir Ben Moshe is a Ph.D. candidate in Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

Agnes Callard is Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

Guy Elgat is a Ph.D. candidate in Philosophy at Northwestern University.

Michael N. Forster is Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago. 

Peter Kail is University Lecturer in the History of Modern Philosophy at Oxford University and Fellow of St. Peter's College, Oxford.

Robin Kar is Professor of Law and Philosophy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nicholas Koziolek is a Ph.D. candidate in Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

John Mikhail is Professor of Law and Philosophy at Georgetown University.

Martha C. Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago.

Jesse J. Prinz is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

Robert J. Richards is Morris Fishbein Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Chicago.

 

Conference Papers and Participants' Schedule

The items below require a password in order to be accessed. Please contact Professor Leiter if believe you should have access to these files.

Papers will be posted as received.

Participants' Schedule
C. Daniel Batson, "Altruism and Morality: No Necessary Connection"
Michael N. Forster, "Genealogy and Morality"
John Mikhail, "Moral Grammar and Intuitive Jurisprudence"
Robert J. Richards, "Evolutionary Ethics: Contra Nietzsche and Contemporaries"

27 Mar 2017 - 3:11pm
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2008 Chicago Conference

University of Chicago Graduate School of Business
Gleacher Center 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60611 USA

Sponsored by the University of Chicago Law School, University of Chicago Graduate School of Business and the Coase Foundation

Program
Professor Coase’s Opening Remarks 

27 Mar 2017 - 3:14pm
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The University of Chicago Law School is proud to present the 2007 Coase Lecture in Law and Economics. The 2007 Coase Lecture will be delivered by Anup Malani, Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School,  on Tuesday, January 23, 2007. The title of the lecture is "Culling Chickens." The lecture will take place at 4:00pm in the Weymouth Kirkland Courtroom of the University of Chicago Law School and a reception will follow. All are welcome. Questions may be directed to Marsha Nagorsky.

Listen to and discuss this lecture on the Law School's Faculty Blog.

Download a PDF of the 2007 Coase Lecture

27 Mar 2017 - 3:37pm
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The University of Chicago Law School Presents the
2008 COASE LECTURE IN LAW AND ECONOMICS

"Slices and Lumps"
Lee Fennell
Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2008 4:00 PM
WEYMOUTH KIRKLAND COURTROOM
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LAW SCHOOL

Problems involving the aggregation and division of entitlements are ubiquitous in law and in everyday life.  Fragments held by multiple parties—such as parcels of land, effort, or segments of a bridge—often must be assembled together to be worth much. Conversely, a presently unified entitlement may be more valuable if it can be split into separate pieces held by different parties.  The lecture will examine these "lumping" and "slicing" problems (which turn out to be two sides of the same coin), show how they turn up in both interpersonal and intrapersonal contexts, and offer some tools for addressing them.  Attention will be given to strategic behavior and valuation difficulties, which pose special challenges to efficient entitlement reconfiguration.

See video, listen to, and discuss this lecture on the Law School's Faculty Blog.

Download a copy of this paper

27 Mar 2017 - 3:53pm
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A later version of this paper was published as "Some Economic Considerations in the Intellectual Property Protection of Software," 24 Journal of Legal Studies 321 (1995).

Download a copy of this paper

27 Mar 2017 - 4:10pm
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Some of the material in part 2 b of this essay has been published before in the Law School Alumni Magazine of the University of Chicago . See Randal C. Picker, Law and Economics II: The Sequel, 39 U. Chi. L. School Record 10 (Spring 1993). Much of the analysis contained herein is taken from selected chapters of Douglas G. Baird, Robert H. Gertner, and Randal C. Picker, Game Theory and the Law (Harvard Univ. Press, 1994, paperback 1998). A version almost identical to this essay appeared as the law and economics selection for a symposium on interdisciplinary approaches to the law in the 27 Loyola ( Los Angeles ) University Law Review 127 (1993).

22.Picker.IntroGame.pdf

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28 Mar 2017 - 10:45am
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Race, Gender and Political Ideology in Personal Bankruptcy Outcomes by Paige Marta Skiba, Vanderbilt University Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 10:57am
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Thursday, February 18th

5:00 – 7:30 PM | Room C
Student Papers
Chaired by Jennifer Nou, University of Chicago

  • Alyssa O'Connor (3L): "'Quiet but not blind': Lessons for Financial Regulators from Austen's Least-loved Protagonist"
  • Alexandra Scott (2L): "Anne Brontë's Helen Huntingdon: A Case Study of the Evolution of the Marital Prison"
  • Sonul Rao (3L): "An Assembly Line of Crime: The Interaction of Money, Class, and the Law in Charles Dickens's Great Expectations"
  • Stacey Petrek (2L): "'Stephen, how like you this play?': Examining the Influence of  Money on the Artist in James Joyce's Ulysses"
  • Luke Sperduto (1L): "Time and Exchange in Fitzgerald's Winter Dreams"

Friday, February 19th

10:00 AM – 12:00 PM | Room V
Nineteenth Century Britain
Chaired by Randy Berlin, University of Chicago

  • “Commerce, Law, and Revolution in the Novels of Elizabeth Gaskell and Charlotte Brontë” - Alison LaCroix, University of Chicago
  • “Money, Law and Status in Trollope’s England” - Nicola Lacey, London School of Economics
  • “Wealth and Warfare in the Novels of Jane Austen” - Seebany Datta-Barua, Illinois Institute of Technology and Jonathan Masur, University of Chicago

12:15 – 1:25 PM | Room II
Keynote
Chaired by Saul Levmore, University of Chicago

  • “Melville, Manufacturing, Machinery and the Modern Economy” - Lawrence H. Summers, Harvard University

1:45 – 3:45 PM | Room V
Nineteenth Century United States
Chaired by William Baude, University of Chicago

  • “Money and Art in Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward” - Douglas Baird, University of Chicago
  • “Counterfeiting Confidence: The Problem of Trust in the Age of Contract” - Susanna Blumenthal, University of Minnesota
  • “Bartleby’s Consensual Dysphoria” - Robin West, Georgetown University

4:30 – 6:00 PM | Courtroom
Play and music
Reception immediately following the production

Saturday, February 20th

9:30 – 10:45 AM | Room V
The Golden Age and the Great Depression I
Chaired by Genevieve Lakier, University of Chicago

  • “Gatsby’s Greatness and Douglas’s Goodness” - Justin Driver, University of Chicago
  • “Regulating Greed: Biographical Markers in Dos Passos’ The Big Money” - Saul Levmore, University of Chicago

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM | Room V
The Golden Age and the Great Depression II
Chaired by John Rappaport, University of Chicago

  • The Grapes of Wrath and the Role of Luck in Economic Outcomes” - Richard McAdams, University of Chicago
  • “The Second New Deal and the Fourth Courtroom Wall: Law, Labor, and Liberty in The Cradle Will Rock” - Laura Weinrib, University of Chicago

2:00 – 4:00 PM | Room V
Religion, Race, Poetry
Chaired by David Weisbach, University of Chicago

  • “The Morning and Evening Star: Religion, Money, and Love in Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt and Elmer Gantry” - Martha C. Nussbaum, University of Chicago
  • Raisin, Race, and The Real Estate Revolution of the Early Twentieth Century” - Carol Rose, Yale University
  • “Irish [and Dutch and American] Poets, Learn Your Trade: The Political Economy of European Poetry since 1900” - Deirdre McCloskey, University of Illinois at Chicago

Abstracts
Musical & Play Program
Nussbaum, "The Morning and the Evening Star"
Levmore, "Regulating Greed"
West, "Bartleby’s Consensual Dysphoria"
Baird, "Money and Art in Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward"
McCloskey, "Irish [and English and American] Poets, Learn Your Trade"
Rose, "Raisin, race, and the real estate revolution of the early 20th century"
Lacey, "Gamblers and Gentlefolk: Money, Law and Status in Trollope’s England"
Datta-Barua & Masur, "Wealth and Warfare in the Novels of Jane Austen"
Blumental, "Counterfeiting Confidence"

28 Mar 2017 - 11:05am
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Kreisman Housing Initiative - April 2017 Gleacher Breakfast Panel

                

Please join us for this breakfast and presentation on "Place-Based Redevelopment Strategies: The Case of the Reclaiming Southwest Chicago Campaign"

April 17, 2017
8:00 AM – Breakfast
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Panel

Gleacher Center
450 N. Cityfront Plaza Drive
Room 208

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register, please visit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/37992/Kreisman.

Jeff Leslie (Moderator)
Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning, Clinical Professor of Law, Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative, Co-director of the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy, and Faculty Director of Curriculum.

Jeff Leslie graduated from Yale College and Yale Law School and clerked for Judge Joel M. Flaum of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Before joining the Law School, he was an Assistant Corporation Counsel in the City of Chicago Department of Law, where he worked on affordable housing and economic development transactions. He is the Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative Clinic, representing community-based affordable housing developers, and teaches courses in commercial real estate, affordable housing law and policy, negotiations, and transactional lawyering skills. He currently serves as the Faculty Director of Curriculum and as Director of Clinical and Experiential Learning. 

Jeff Bartow
Executive Director, Southwest Organizing Project

Jeff has been organizing in the Chicago metropolitan area since 1989, after spending 10 years organizing in Fort Worth, Texas. Jeff has been a resident of Southwest Chicago since 1992. He joined SWOP as Executive Director in September 2002. Prior to becoming the Executive Director of SWOP, he served as the Executive Director of the Interfaith Leadership Project of Cicero, Berwyn and Stickney for nearly a decade.

Susan J. Popkin, PhD
Senior Fellow, Urban Institute

Susan Popkin is a senior fellow and director of the Neighborhoods and Youth Development initiative in the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute. A nationally recognized expert on public and assisted housing, Popkin directs a research program that focuses on the ways neighborhood environments affect outcomes for youth and on assessing comprehensive community-based interventions. A particular focus is gender differences in neighborhood effects and improving outcomes for marginalized girls.

Popkin’s current projects include the multisite HOST demonstration, which is testing two-generation service models for vulnerable families in public and assisted housing while creating a network of housing providers seeking to use housing as a platform for services; PASS, a community-based participatory research effort to develop strategies to promote sexual health and safety for adolescents and reduce coercive and risky behavior; the evaluation of the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative; and the evaluation of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family-Centered Community Change Initiative.

Popkin is the coauthor of the award-winning Moving to Opportunity: The Story of an American Experiment to Fight Ghetto Poverty, lead author of The Hidden War: Crime and the Tragedy of Public Housing in Chicago, and coauthor of Public Housing Transformation: The Legacy of Segregation.

Amir Sufi, PhD
Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Amir Sufi is the Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He serves as an associate editor for the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Professor Sufi's research focuses on finance and macroeconomics. He has articles published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Finance, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. His recent research on household debt and the economy has been profiled in the Economist, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. It has also been presented to policy-makers at the Federal Reserve, the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs, and the White House Council of Economic Advisors. This research forms the basis of his book co-authored with Atif Mian: House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession and How We Can Prevent It from Happening Again, which was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2014.

Sufi graduated Phi Beta Kappa with honors from the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University with a bachelor's degree in economics. He earned a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 2005.

PARKING

Parking is available free of charge at the lot at 201 E Illinois. Enter the lot, located at the intersection of Lower Illinois and St. Clair, from either the Lower Illinois or St. Clair entrance. Take a ticket from the machine as you enter the lot, and pick up a validation sticker as you check in for the panel event. The sticker will allow you to exit the lot free of charge following the event. You may find this map of parking lots surrounding the Gleacher Center helpful. The 201 E Illinois lot is marked with a "4" on page two of the map.

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register, please visit http://www.law.uchicago.edu/node/37992/Kreisman.


This event is organized by the Kreisman Initiative on Housing Law and Policy at the University of Chicago Law School, which brings together the best housing research at the University of Chicago to engage the real estate, public policy, and financial communities. The Initiative is co-directed by Lee Fennell, Max Pam Professor of Law at the Law School, and Jeff Leslie, Clinical Professor of Law and Paul J. Tierney Director of the Housing Initiative at the Law School.

28 Mar 2017 - 11:08am
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Competition and Unconscionability  Ezra Friedman, Northwestern University School of Law

28 Mar 2017 - 11:33am
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Duopoly Theory with Exclusionary Contracts: The Abuse of Joint Dominance by Edward M. Iacobucci, University of Toronto Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 11:44am
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The ABA presents Tony West, Assistant Attorney General, Civil Division, United States Department of Justice. Beginning at 4pm in the Courtroom, Mr. West will deliver a keynote speech before opening the floor to a Q&A, moderated by Robert A. Clifford of Clifford Law Offices, ABA Illinois state delegate to the ABA House of Delegates. Following that will be a networking reception in the Courtroom Hallway. Students can also enter to win various prizes, including a free membership to the ABA law student division, a complete bar review course from Kaplan PMBR, and a trip to the ABA annual meeting.

Download the flyer

28 Mar 2017 - 11:47am
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Risk Reversibility by Lee Fennell, University of Chicago Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 11:50am
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Don Herzog is working on a book on household politics in early modern England.  Despite the illusions of word-processing and his heroic ability to whip footnotes into shape, this draft remains quite rough.

28 Mar 2017 - 11:54am
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Set in Stone? Change and Innovation in Consumer Standard Form Contracts
Florencia Marotta-Wurgler, New York University School of Law, and Robert Taylor, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

28 Mar 2017 - 12:03pm
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Social Titles and Coordination Richard Brooks, Yale Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 12:06pm
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Are Criminal Sentencing Guidelines Binding? Quasi-experimental Evidence from Human Calculation Errors by Ann Piehl, Department of Economics, Rutgers University

28 Mar 2017 - 12:09pm
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Intellectual Property as a Law of Organization by Jonathan Barnett, University of Southern California Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 12:11pm
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Ordeals by Peter T. Leeson, George Mason University, Department of Economics

28 Mar 2017 - 12:20pm
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A Theory of Rational Jurisprudence  by Scott Baker, Washington University Law School

28 Mar 2017 - 12:26pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

28 Mar 2017 - 12:31pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

28 Mar 2017 - 12:34pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

28 Mar 2017 - 12:45pm
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Judicial Review and Democratic Failure by Matthew Stephenson, Harvard Law School

This workshop is held in conjunction with the Milton Friedman Institute for Research in Economics.

28 Mar 2017 - 12:48pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

28 Mar 2017 - 12:49pm
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Organized by Professors Richard H. McAdams and Thomas J. Miles, this conference will explore economic theory and empiricism on race in employment, housing, policing, criminal sentencing, politics, and other areas of public policy concern. Our participants will be nationally prominent economists from law schools, economics departments, and allied fields. Our aim is to provide stronger social science foundations for law and policy affecting or affected by race. The Journal of Legal Studies intends to publish a special symposium issue on this topic for those paper contributions that are approved through peer review.

 

Conference schedule

Friday, May 14th

9:30-9:45 a.m.

  • Dean Michael H. Schill
  • Welcome and introduction

9:45-10:45 a.m.

10:45-11:45 a.m.

  • Richard Brooks, Yale Law School, "Diversity and Perceptions of Racial Justice"
  • Discussant: Lee Fennell, University of Chicago Law School

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. - Break

1:15-2:15 p.m.

  • Steve Raphael, University of California Berkeley, "The Evolution of Gender Employment Differentials within Racial Groups in the United States"
  • Discussant: Derek Neal, University of Chicago

2:15-3:15 p.m.

  • Peter Siegelman, University of Connecticut School of Law, "The Compromised Worker and the Limits of Employment Discrimination Law"
  • Discussant: Kerwin Charles, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago, and National Bureau of Economic Research

3:15-3:30 p.m. Break

3:30-4:30 p.m.

  • Ebonya Washington, Yale University and National Bureau of Economic Research, "The Mythical Tradeoff between Black Representatives and Black Policy Interests"
  • Discussant: Adam Cox, University of Chicago Law School

4:30-5:30 p.m.

Saturday, May 15th

9:00-10:00 a.m.

10:00-11:00 a.m.

  • David Abrams, University of Pennsylvania Law School, "Do Judges Vary in Their Treatment of Race?"
  • Discussant: Jonathan Guryan, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

11:00-Noon

  • Max Schanzenbach, Northwestern University School of Law, "Racial Disparities, Judicial Discretion, and the United States Sentencing Guidelines"
  • Discussant: Jens Ludwig, University of Chicago and Co-Director of the University of Chicago Crime Lab

Read abstracts of papers that will be presented at the conference.

28 Mar 2017 - 1:00pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

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29 Mar 2017 - 11:56am
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Learning From the City:  The Midwest Regional Convening of U.N. Habitat III

Learning From the City is one of five regional convenings co-hosted by the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development in collaboration with civic,
governmental, educational, and philanthropic partners in advance of the U.N.
Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III).

9:30-11:00am: Investing in People and Communities
11:15-12:30pm: Securing Housing Options for All
12:45-1:30pm: Lunch Keynote
1:45-3:00pm: Responding to Shocks and Building Resilience ** Professor Mark Templeton**
3:15-4:30pm: The Role of Big Data in Shaping Regional Policy
4:30-4:45pm: Concluding Remarks

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required.

Event program

29 Mar 2017 - 11:59am
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29 Mar 2017 - 12:00pm
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"The Distortionary Effect of Evidence on Primary Behavior"
Alex Stein, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University

29 Mar 2017 - 12:03pm
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Coal Mine Safety: Do Unions Make a Difference?
Alison Morantz, Stanford Law School

29 Mar 2017 - 12:05pm
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"Liability Rules when Injurer's Assets Are Endogenous: The Efficiency of Softer Standards"
Fernando Gomez, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

29 Mar 2017 - 12:14pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

29 Mar 2017 - 12:15pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

29 Mar 2017 - 12:18pm
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Reading:

  • "The Law and Policy of Judicial Retirement"
29 Mar 2017 - 12:21pm
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The Intellectual Property Law Society and the Federalist Society are happy to welcome Jeff Wall, '03, and Ashley Keller, '07, back to the Law School for a discussion on the Supreme Court's "Unprecedented Interest in IP Issues."

Jeff Wall, '03, is the Co-Head of Sullivan and Cromwell's Appellate Litigation Practice in Washington, D.C. He has argued 11 cases before the Supreme Court and filed more than 175 merits or certiorari-stage briefs in that Court. Named by The National Law Journal as a “rising star” for being “one of the youngest advocates to rack up double-digit U.S. Supreme Court appearances,” he recently argued Stryker v. Zimmer and Halo Electronics v. Pulse Electronics on the availability of enhanced damages in patent infringement cases. Mr. Wall joined S&C after serving as an Assistant to the Solicitor General in the U.S. Department of Justice. He received a number of recognitions for his advocacy before the Supreme Court during that time, including awards from the Attorney General for outstanding contributions by a new employee and from the Internal Revenue Service for outstanding support to the Office of Chief Counsel.

Mr. Wall was a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas and Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He has taught courses in law school on administrative law and federal jurisdiction. He is an officer of the Edward Coke Appellate Inn of Court, which is the principal bench-bar organization for appellate judges and lawyers in the Washington area.  He is also a member of the Advisory Committee on Procedures for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, as well as the Supreme Court Historical Society. Mr. Wall graduated from Georgetown University and received a JD from the Law School in 2003.

Ashley C. Keller, '07, co-founded Gerchen Keller Capital and serves as a Managing Director. He is a former partner at Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP, The American Lawyer’s litigation boutique of the year, where he handled various trial and appellate matters involving multi-billion-dollar securities and patent cases, contractual disputes and mass-tort class actions. Before practicing, Mr. Keller was a law clerk for Judge Richard Posner at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy at the Supreme Court of the United States.
 
Most recently, Mr. Keller was an analyst at Alyeska Investment Group, a Chicago-based market neutral hedge fund, where he focused on investments in companies facing litigation and other complicated regulatory matters. Mr. Keller graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College and received an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a JD from the Law School in 2007, where he graduated first in his class.

Catering will be provided by Z&H MarketCafe. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited.

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29 Mar 2017 - 12:23pm
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Rethinking Personal Jurisdiction
Daniel Klerman, USC Gould School of Law

29 Mar 2017 - 12:24pm
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The first speaker at this new Forum on Contracting will be Lucian Bebchuk, William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Friedman Professor of Law, Harvard Law School. His presentation will be "How to Fix Bankers' Pay."

The forum will be held at the Law School in room F.

This event is in conjunction with the Law School and the Booth School of Business.  It is organized by Omri Ben-Shahar at the Law School and Richard Holden at Booth.

[How to Fix Bankers' Pay]

29 Mar 2017 - 12:32pm
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Max Schanzenbach, Professor of Law and Director of the Searle Center on Law, Regulation and Economic Growth, Northwestern University School of Law
Racial Disparities, Judicial Discretion, and the United States Sentencing Guidelines

29 Mar 2017 - 12:33pm
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(students please arrive at 11.45am for brief introduction)

29 Mar 2017 - 12:37pm
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The second speaker at this new Forum on Contracting will be Oliver Hart, Andrew E. Furer Professor of Economics, Harvard University. His presentation will be "Rethinking Incomplete Contracts."

The forum will be held at the Booth School of Business, Hyde Park campus, room C10.

This event is in conjunction with the Law School and Booth School of Business.  It is organized by Omri Ben-Shahar at the Law School and Richard Holden at Booth.

PPT Slides

29 Mar 2017 - 12:47pm
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The workshop is open to all faculty, fellows, and staff and to students taking the course for credit. Other students may be able to attend if they have a special interest in the paper being presented, but they should check with Mr. Strauss first, because space is limited.

29 Mar 2017 - 12:49pm
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Taxation and Liquidity
Yair Listokin, Associate Professor of Law, Yale University

29 Mar 2017 - 12:51pm
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"Political Will and Fiscal Federalism in Municipal Bankruptcy"
Clay Gillette, Max E. Greenberg Professor of Contract Law, New York University

29 Mar 2017 - 12:53pm
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The Borat Problem and the Law of Negotiation
Russell Korobkin, Professor of Law, UCLA

29 Mar 2017 - 1:07pm
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"Blank Checks, Insufficient Balances"
John A. Ferejohn, New York University School of Law

29 Mar 2017 - 1:09pm
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From the National Archives, to More Military Commissions, Indefinite Executive Detention, and Wikileaks: The Ongoing Debate as Seen Through the Eyes of Trial Lawyers. Please join the University of Chicago Law School's American Constitution Society and the International Human Rights Law Society on Tuesday, May 10th, 2011 at 12:15pm in Room I as we proudly welcome three extremely prominent trial lawyers from Illinois, Florida, and New York involved in the defense of Guantanamo detainees and in numerous other complex criminal cases. 

Thomas Anthony Durkin has been admitted by the U.S. Department of Defense to The Pool of Qualified Civilian Defense Counsel to Practice Before the Military Commissions, and presently serves on the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyer’s Select Committee on Military Tribunals and Terrorism. He also serves as a member of the Advisory Committee of the Center for Civil and Human Rights of the University of Notre Dame Law School.  Mr. Durkin’s efforts to defend several Guantanamo Bay detainees have attracted national attention and praise. He served as counsel, along with the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City, for two detainees at Guantanamo Bay who have since been returned to their home countries, for which he and his firm, along with all other Guantanamo counsel, received the 2007 Frederick Douglass Human Rights Award from the Southern Center for Human Rights.  Mr. Durkin was selected in 2008 to be a participant in the John Adams Project, a joint effort of the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to provide civilian defense counsel to assist the military lawyers in the trial of the five High Value Detainees charged in U.S. v. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, et al., in the Military Commissions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with conspiring to orchestrate the September 11th attacks of the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

Linda Moreno has successfully defended clients in a number of high profile cases including Dr. Sami al-Arian, a Palestinian professor, in a case that the government described as the seminal test of the Patriot Act in United States vs. Sami Amin al-Arian, et al. After a 6-month trial, which garnered international attention, the jury refused, in a 53-count indictment, to return a single guilty verdict against Dr. al-Arian and acquitted him of several of the most serious charges.   Ms. Moreno also represented the chairman of the board of the pre-eminent Muslim charity in America in the federal prosecution of United States vs. Holy Land Foundation, et al, in Dallas, Texas.  Ms. Moreno has lectured on civil liberties and terrorism prosecutions at various universities and institutions, including Columbia University Law School and  Yale Law School. She has appeared on numerous panels, both in the United States and abroad, on subjects involving civil liberties in the wake of the events of September 11, 2001.

Joshua L. Dratel has stood up for individual rights in some of the past three decades' most complicated and important cases both factually and legally, including the investigations and prosecutions of major construction companies, a telecommunications giant, the 1998 bombings of the U.S. Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, and representation of political and business leaders. He has appeared for defendants in nine different federal districts, and has written or argued appeals in the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Eighth, and Ninth Circuits.  Mr. Dratel's honors include the Frederick Douglas Human Rights Award from the Southern Center for Human Rights in 2007, the Robert C. Heeney Award from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers in 2006, and the Clarence Darrow Award from the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho in 2005.  Mr. Dratel was named one of New York's Super Lawyers for both 2008 and 2009.  Mr. Dratel is co editor of The Torture Papers: The Legal Road to Abu Ghraib (Cambridge University Press: 2005), which won the American Association of Publishers 2005 Award for Excellence in Professional and Scholarly Publishing (Law and Legal Studies).

Free lunch will be provided. Tuesday, May 10th at 12:15pm (please arrive at 12:05 for food). Room I, University of Chicago Law School. For more information, please contact Molly L. Wiltshire: mwiltshire@uchicago.edu.

Guantanamo Redux poster.pdf

29 Mar 2017 - 1:35pm
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This conference, organized by Jake Gersen and Richard Epstein, will deal generally with the legal, economic and social issues that surround education in the United States. The conference and papers will cover a wide range of topics that run the gamut from K-12, college, and graduate education, both in the private and the for-profit sector. The proceeds of the conference will be published in the January 2012 volume of the University of Chicago Law Review. The event is sponsored by the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics and the University of Chicago Law Review.

Friday:  June 17, 2011

8:50 a.m.

welcome Richard A. Epstein

9:00 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

"Freedom to Fail: The Keystone of American Federalism"
Paul Peterson and Daniel Nadler, both Harvard University

9:50 a.m.–10:40 a.m.

“Teaching Patriotism: Love and Critical Freedom”
Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago Law School

10:50 a.m.–11:40 a.m.

“Do Amish One-Room Schools Make the Grade? The Dubious Data of Wisconsin v. Yoder"
William Fischel, Department of Economics, Dartmouth College

11:40 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

“A Critique of the Obama Administation's New Gainful Employment Rules”
David Figuli, Partner, Figuli Law Group, and Anthony Guida, Senior Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Education Management Corporation

2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

“The Economic Future of Higher Education”
Henry Hansmann, Yale Law School

2:50 p.m.–3:40 p.m.

“What Is ‘Education’?” 
Emily Buss, University of Chicago Law School

3:40 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

“The Role of Accreditation Commissions in Higher Education: The Troublesome Case of Dana College”
Richard Epstein, New York University, Hoover Institution and  University of Chicago Law School

Saturday: June 18, 2011

9:00 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

“Religion, Schools, and Judicial Decisionmaking: An Empirical Perspective”
Michael Heise, Cornell Law School

9:50 a.m.–10:40 a.m.

“Catholic Schools, Charter Schools, and Urban Neighborhoods”
Margaret Brinig and Nicole Garnett, both University of Notre Dame

10:55 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

“Special Education: Its Ethical Dilemmas, Entitlement Status, and Suggested Systemic Reforms”
Miriam Kurtzig Freedman, Of counsel, Stoneman, Chandler & Miller LLP, Boston

11:45 a.m.–12:35 p.m.

"Making Courts Matter: Politics and the Implementatoin of State Supreme Court Decisions"
Christopher R. Berry, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago, and Charles Wysong, Stanford Law School

printable schedule

29 Mar 2017 - 1:38pm
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"Have Inter-Judge Sentencing Disparities Increased in an Advisory Guidelines Regime? Evidence From Booker"

29 Mar 2017 - 1:42pm
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Michael K. Fridkin, Senior Staff Attorney for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, will be speaking about clerkship opportunities. The Office of Staff Attorneys handles about half of all the cases in the 7th Circuit and about a fourth of all cases subject to oral argument. Appendix A of the Clerkship Manual has a list of alumni who have worked in the Office of Staff Attorneys at the Seventh Circuit. Please RSVP at http://www.law.uchicago.edu/clerkshipprograms.

29 Mar 2017 - 1:49pm
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*This will be a lunchtime workshop. Lunch will be served.

29 Mar 2017 - 1:50pm
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"Barnette and the First Amendment Right to Privacy.” 

*This will be a lunchtime workshop. Lunch will be served.

29 Mar 2017 - 2:05pm
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Reading:

Corey Rayburn Yung, "How Judges Decide: A Multidimensional Empirical Typology of Judicial Styles in the Federal Courts."

29 Mar 2017 - 2:23pm
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Incentives for Corruption
Ben Olken, Department of Economics MIT

[slides]

29 Mar 2017 - 2:26pm
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When and Why Individuals Obey Form-Adhesive Contracts: Experimental Evidence of Consent, Compliance, Promise, and Performance
Zev J. Eigen, Nothwestern University School of Law

29 Mar 2017 - 2:27pm
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“Should Consumers Be Permitted to Waive Products Liability? Product Safety, Private Contracts, and Adverse Selection”
Kathryn Spier, Harvard Law School

29 Mar 2017 - 2:29pm
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For those prospective students who will be in the area, we encourage you to visit us during one of our Prospective Student Open Houses.  Each Open House is free and open to the public.  Read more about what to expect at one of our Prospective Student Open Houses and RSVP to attend one.  

2015 Prospective Student Open Houses

29 Mar 2017 - 2:29pm
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For those prospective students who will be in the area, we encourage you to visit us during one of our Prospective Student Open Houses.  Each Open House is free and open to the public.  Read more about what to expect at one of our Prospective Student Open Houses and RSVP to attend one.  

2015 Prospective Student Open Houses

29 Mar 2017 - 2:36pm
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The University of Chicago Law School and the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics welcome Kate Litvak, Professor of Law at Northwestern University School of Law.

Professor Litvak will explore findings in her paper, Investment - Cash Flow Sensitivity Is Not Caused by Financial Constraint: New Evidence From a Randomized SEC Experiment.

The sensitivity of firm’s investment to cash flows is one of the grand unresolved puzzles of corporate finance. This sensitivity could be caused by a firm’s financing constraints (and therefore reveal imperfections in capital markets), by agency problems, or by non-problematic factors. Prior papers have not been able to disentangle these causal relationships because the firm’s financing constraints, investment, and cash flows are endogenous.

29 Mar 2017 - 2:37pm
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Please join us for a lunch event featuring James Cole ’95, who is President Obama’s nominee for General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Education. Formerly a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York, James will speak about why he chose to join Wachtell and then the Obama Administration, as well as highlights from his experiences as a junior associate, senior associate, law firm partner and senior governmental official. A lively Q&A session will follow his remarks.

This event is free and open to Law School students, faculty, and staff.

James Cole '95

29 Mar 2017 - 2:39pm
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Valuable Lies

Should a Muslim employee who falsely stated in his job interview that he is Christian in order to avoid discrimination be fired for his dishonesty? Should a buyer of a tract of land who conducted an expensive investigation before contracting that revealed a high likelihood of mineral deposits be subject to liability for fraud because he told the seller he knew nothing about the land's mineral potential before purchase? Is a doctor violating her legal duties toward her patient if she convinces him to get vaccinated on the pretext that it is in his best interest when it is instead in the public interest? In all of these cases, and many others, parties are allowed not to disclose material information to an interested party but not to lie about the same information.

Ariel Porat, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University and Fischel-Neil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School

29 Mar 2017 - 2:40pm
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The University of Chicago Law School Presents
The 2017 2017 Ulysses and Marguerite Schwartz Memorial Lecture

American Lawyers:  What we have been. What we must be now.  

Featuring Roberta Ramo, Modrall Sperling

29 Mar 2017 - 2:40pm
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The Blueberry Soup Outreach Tour is a year long nationwidescreening and discussion series based around the themes ofcommunity participation found in the people’s movement in Icelandthat lead to the rewriting of the nation’s constitution. The keyargument being the value of social media and person to person communications within participatory government, using the film Blueberry Soup as a catalyst. Each event will begin with a free publicscreening of the documentary, followed by a Q+A forum where we will discuss the points of the film and how they relate to localinitiatives and engaging the community. The intention of these eventsis to give examples to individuals looking to collaborate with theirneighbors in developing local solutions to problems within the society.

blueberrysouppress2014.pdf

29 Mar 2017 - 2:41pm
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Over the last decade, a growing body of empirical scholarship has emerged that tries to test whether international human rights treaties have helped to improve human rights practices. Although this line of research has produced some evidence suggesting that human rights treaties may have made a difference in specific circumstances, the balance of the evidence has not found a consistent relationship between ratification of human rights treaties and improved human rights practices. This evidence raises the question that is the topic of the conference: has international human rights law failed? This conference will bring together prominent political scientists, historians, philosophers, and legal scholars to discuss this question.

The conference is organized by Eric Posner and Adam Chilton and sponsored by the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics.

Participants include:
Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago
Samuel Moyn, Harvard University
Yonatan Lupu, George Washington University
Jeremy Waldron, New York University
Tom Ginsburg, University of Chicago
Zach Elkins, University of Texas
Mathias Risse, Harvard University
Andrew Woods, University of Kentucky College of Law
Christopher Fariss, Penn State University
Geoff Dancy, Tulane University
Katerina Linos, University of California, Berkeley
Anna Schrimpf, Princeton University
Eric Posner, University of Chicago
Adam Chilton, University of Chicago

Registration has closed. There may be seats available on a wait and see basis for certain paper presentations. 

Conference Schedule

29 Mar 2017 - 3:06pm
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Douglas A. Blackmon is the Pulitzer-Prize winning author of Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II, and co-executive producer of the acclaimed PBS documentary of the same name. He is also the executive producer and host of American Forum, a public affairs program produced at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center and aired weekly on more than 250 PBS affiliates across the US.

Blackmon was the longtime chief of The Wall Street Journal’s Atlanta bureau and the paper’s Senior National Correspondent until 2012, when he joined the faculty of the University of Virginia and became a contributing editor at the Washington Post. 

His book, a searing examination of how the enslavement of African-Americans persisted deep into the 20th century, was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. The Slavery by Another Name documentary was broadcast in February 2012 and attracted an audience of 4.8 million viewers.

On Thursday, February 11, 2016, Mr. Blackmon will visit The Law School to discuss the Legacy of Neo-Slavery as expressed through Mass Incarceration and Aggressive Policing.

Douglas Blackmon

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30 Mar 2017 - 10:56am
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Now in her fourth term as the chief legal officer for the State of Illinois, Attorney General Lisa Madigan will discuss her role in civil rights issues in the United States that serve as a reminder that human rights are not a concept reserved to foreign affairs. Learn about the Office of the Attorney General’s role as a human rights lawyer and how you could use your law degree to promote human rights in our country and the world.

Sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic and the Domestic and Sexual Violence Project. 

Lunch provided. Seating limited. 

30 Mar 2017 - 11:26am
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Following the popular uprisings that swept across the region starting December 2010, ten Arab countries replaced, rewrote or reconsidered their constitutions, with some countries doing so several times in just a few years.  It was the largest concentration of constitutional negotiations anywhere in the world since the fall of the Berlin Wall.  Despite the revolutionary environment and the clear popular demand for change, almost all of the constitutions that were adopted were only superficially different from the texts that they replaced.  In my presentation, I will offer an explanation for this disappointing development, which will center around two main factors: (i) that the region’s constitutions are underpinned by a small number of fundamental principles that are heavily inspired by the region’s modern colonial history; and (ii) democratic forces throughout the region did not make the case for wholesale structural change.  I will expand on both these factors and offer a prognosis for future developments in the relationship between the individual and the state in the Arab region.

Zaid Al-Ali is the Senior Adviser on Constitution-Building for the Arab Region at International IDEA and an independent scholar.  In his work, Al-Ali focuses on constitutional developments throughout the Arab region, with a particular focus on Iraq and the wave of reforms that took place in Morocco, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan and Yemen following the start of popular uprisings in December 2010.  Al-Ali has published extensively on constitutional reform in the Arab region, including on process design issues and the impact of external influence.  He is the author of The Struggle for Iraq’s Future: How Corruption, Incompetence and Sectarianism Have Undermined Democracy (Yale University Press 2014).  Prior to joining International IDEA, Zaid worked as a legal adviser to the United Nations in Iraq, focusing on constitutional, parliamentary and judicial reform.  He also practiced international commercial arbitration law for 12 years, representing clients in investment and oil and gas disputes mainly as an attorney with Shearman & Sterling LLC in Paris and also as a sole practitioner.  He holds an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, a Maitrise en Droit from the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and an LL.B. from King’s College London.  He was a Law and Public Affairs Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at Princeton University in 2015-2016.  He is a founder member of the Arab Association of Constitutional Law and is a member of its executive committee.

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

30 Mar 2017 - 12:36pm
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Please join us at Roosevelt House as we welcome Geoffrey R. Stone, one of America's most distinguished legal scholars, to discuss his groundbreaking new book, Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America's Origins to the Twenty-First Century, a one-volume history that overturns popular shibboleths, while dramatically narrating the epic story of how sex came to be legislated in America.

Video Live stream

Details

Faculty: Geoffrey R. Stone

 

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