Audio Archives

From intimate lunchtime talks by our world-renowned faculty to academic conferences curated by student organizations, the Law School is continually host to some of the most groundbreaking ideas in the legal academy and beyond. Since 2005, the Law School has been committed to sharing these ideas with not only our campus community but with the world at large by making available free audio recordings of selected events. Please use the filters below to find a recording that might interest you, or use the page links at the bottom to browse through the list at your leisure.

  • June 4, 2009

    The Enlightenment took us from a world of Empire to an Age of Reason and equality in the public sphere. But it left the private spheres of culture and religion in the Dark Ages of imposition and unreason. In the Enlightenment worldview, freedom in the public sphere is freedom itself.

  • April 23, 2009

    What will the election of Barack Obama mean for the Supreme Court of the United States? To answer this question, it is necessary to understand the current make-up of the Court and its direction. What are the predispositions of the current Justices? What do we mean today by the terms "liberal"...

  • February 13, 2009

    In this talk, subtitled "A Dialogue about Political Philosophy and the Judge's Role," Professor Nussbaum discussed her "capabilities approach," a normative approach to basic political principles that has implications for how constitutions should be both written and interpreted.

  • February 12, 2009

    Labor relations consists of two broad areas—unions and employment discrimination. Both areas have been stable for some time. The last major labor law reform was in 1959. The employment discrimination law dates back to 1991. The new Obama administration is, however, ramping up tough legislation...

  • January 29, 2009

    Can China be convinced to join an international climate change agreement? Existing studies that purport to answer this question incorrectly treat China as a unitary nation, leading to inaccurate projections about the behavior of the Chinese State and even China's future carbon emissions.

  • December 4, 2008

    Law often allocates risk, as through tort doctrines. Should people be able to undo or "reverse" such risk allocations by, for example, selling their rights to any claims that may later develop? Scholars have interestingly examined this question, as well as many other innovative ideas for...

  • November 13, 2008

    There is the well known problem, or reality, of juvenile and destructive communication on the Internet, normally engaged in behind the protective cover of anonymity. Is this somehow a different problem on the Internet than it is elsewhere and, if so, are there solutions that are effective and...

  • October 30, 2008

    Mary Anne Case is Arnold I. Shure Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk, entitled "Why Evangelical Protestants are Right When They Say that State Recognition of Same-Sex Marriages Threatens Their Marriages and What the Law Should Do About It," was recorded October 1...

  • July 25, 2008

    In the absence of pre-cognitive superbeings and Tom Cruise, how are police and policy makers supposed to allocate scarce crime-fighting resources? There is a vibrant academic literature on predicting crime, with models of various types offered as the best way of estimating future crime rates.

  • July 11, 2008

    It has become commonplace in American political discourse for Christian evangelicals to assert that the United States was founded as a "Christian nation" and that in recent decades secularists have gained control and distorted our nation's founding traditions and values. In this lecture,...