Audio Archives

From intimate lunchtime talks by our world-renowned faculty to academic conferences curated by student organizations, the Law School is continually host to some of the most groundbreaking ideas in the legal academy and beyond. Since 2005, the Law School has been committed to sharing these ideas with not only our campus community but with the world at large by making available free audio recordings of selected events. Please use the filters below to find a recording that might interest you, or use the page links at the bottom to browse through the list at your leisure.

  • May 20, 2014

    As part of the anti-abortion movement's legislative campaign, seven states have passed bans on sex-selective abortion and many more are pending, including in Congress. Advocates of the bans argue that they are needed to prevent widespread elimination of female fetuses by Asians in the United...

  • May 15, 2014

    This talk was recorded on April 25, 2014, as the Law School's annual Loop Luncheon.

  • May 13, 2014

    The U.S. Constitution is "the supreme Law of the Land." Of course some of its provisions are vague and must be interpreted. But when the Constitution says something clearly, we follow it. Don't we?

  • May 8, 2014

    Economics explains legal compliance via sanctions, particularly by the ability of legal sanctions to change the cost of behavior and deter noncompliance. Yet rational choice tools predict other ways in which law influences behavior: by suggesting a means of coordination and by informing beliefs...

  • May 6, 2014

    Thomas R. Lee was appointed to the Utah Supreme Court by Governor Gary Herbert in July 2010. Before joining the Court, Justice Lee was the Rex & Maureen Rawlinson Professor of Law at the Brigham Young University Law School, where he continues to serve on a part-time basis as Distinguished...

  • April 29, 2014

    Alex Brill is a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies the impact of tax policy on the U.S. economy as well as the fiscal, economic, and political consequences of tax, budget, health care, retirement security, and trade policies. He also works on health care...

  • April 24, 2014

    The laws of intestacy are the same for men and women even though preferences for how one's estate should be divided differ by gender. Peanut-allergic octogenarian men and gluten-allergic pregnant women see the same warnings on consumer products even though they are interested in seeing...

  • April 23, 2014

    Professor Duncan is the Sherman S. Welpton Professor of Law at the University of Nebraska College of Law. He received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) in 1973. In 1976, he received his J.D. from the Cornell Law School, where he served on the Board of Editors of the...

  • April 21, 2014

    Congressman Michael Quigley is a graduate of the Harris School of Policy. He is the Congressman for Illinois's 5th District. Con. Quigley is outspoken against the FDA's ban against blood donation and will be at the law school to share his stance and answer questions from the audience.

  • April 10, 2014

    Legal discussions of negligence focus on issues of harm, fault, and remedy in the context of failure to exercise reasonable care.  The point of orientation is the negligent event.  In this talk I want to investigate a related moral duty, the duty of due care.