The Faculty Podcast

Listen to lectures by—and discussions with—the University of Chicago Law School's eminent faculty, as well as some very special guests.

January 15, 2010

This address by Ronald Coase (Clifton R. Musser Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Chicago Law School) to the conference "Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase" was recorded November 23, 2009.

December 31, 2009

This talk was presented on October 16, 2009 at the Conference on Comparative Constitutional Design at the University of Chicago Law School. Eric Posner is Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School, and Adrian Vermeule is John H. Watson, Jr. Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. John Carey (Dartmouth College) provided commentary on the paper.

December 14, 2009

This talk was recorded on October 17, 2009 as part of the Conference Comparative Constitutional Design held at the Unversity of Chicago Law School. Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Law School. Rajmohan Gandhi (University of Illinois) provides commentary.

December 3, 2009

Legal scholars praise "incrementalism" and "minimalism" in law, which is to say the idea that law should progress in small steps and lawmakers should intervene less rather than more. But the acclaim for these approaches ignores the role of interest groups in our legal system. There are many issues where there is good reason to think that legislating step-by-step is a recipe for getting to the wrong result.

Saul Levmore is Dean and William B. Graham Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded on November 10, 2009 as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas Series.

November 19, 2009

What work do the categories "the free market" and "regulation" do for us? Why do we incarcerate one out of every one hundred adults? These seemingly unrelated questions, it turns out, are deeply interconnected. The categories of free and regulated markets emerged as an effort to make sense of irreducibly individual phenomena—unique forms of social organization. In the process, the categories helped shape the dominant belief that the economic realm is characterized by natural order, and that the only legitimate sphere of government intervention is policing and punishment. The consequences have been devastating: first, in distorting and expanding the penal sphere beyond our worst possible dreams, and, second, in naturalizing and masking the regulatory mechanisms inherent to all markets that massively redistribute wealth. In this CBI, Professor Harcourt challenges these categories and asks us to imagine a world where the terms "free" and "regulated" markets no longer exist.

This talk was recorded May 21, 2009 as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas lecture series.

November 5, 2009

The University of Chicago Law School's "Shakespeare and the Law" conference brought together thinkers from law, literature, and philosophy to investigate the legal dimensions of Shakespeare's plays. Participants explored the ways in which the plays show awareness of law and legal regimes and comment on a variety of legal topics, ranging from general themes, such as mercy and the rule of law, to highly concrete legal issues of his time. Other papers investigated the subsequent influence of his plays on the law and explored more general issues concerning the relationship between law and literature.

The keynote session of the conference featured Justice Stephen Breyer, Judge Richard Posner, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics Martha Nussbaum, and Frank L. Sulzberger Distinguished Service Professor Richard Strier (English, University of Chicago). It was recorded May 15th, 2009.

October 29, 2009

This panel discussion was recorded on October 20, 2009 and was sponsored by Outlaw, the Law School Democrats, and the Law School Republicans. Mary Anne Case is Arnold I. Shure Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School; Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago Law School; David Strauss is Gerald Ratner Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School; and James Madigan is Class of '00 and Lecturer in at the University of Chicago Law School.

October 22, 2009

Tom Ginsburg is Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This paper, co-written with Zachary Elkins (University of Texas at Austin School of Law) and James Melton (IMT Institute for Advanced Studies, Italy) was presented on October 17, 2009 at the Conference on Comparative Constitutional Design at the University of Chicago Law School. Jose Antonio Cheibub  (University of Illinois) provides commentary on the paper.

October 16, 2009

Alison Siegler is Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School and is the Director of the Mandel Legal Aid Clinic’s Federal Criminal Justice Project. This talk was recorded On October 15, 2009 and sponsored by the Chicago chapter of the American Constitution Society.

October 12, 2009

Jonathan Masur is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded October 5, 2009 as part of the Law School's annual First Monday Lecture Series.