Audio Archives

From intimate lunchtime talks by our world-renowned faculty to academic conferences curated by student organizations, the Law School is continually host to some of the most groundbreaking ideas in the legal academy and beyond. Since 2005, the Law School has been committed to sharing these ideas with not only our campus community but with the world at large by making available free audio recordings of selected events. Please use the filters below to find a recording that might interest you, or use the page links at the bottom to browse through the list at your leisure.

  • April 17, 2015

    We are in an age of accelerating technology but many fear we are also in an age of growing inequality. Does the fast pace of innovation pose a threat to social stability? Many fear that machines will take away jobs from the less skilled and extend the reach of superstars, thus deepening...

  • April 17, 2015

    Our patent system has historically been thought to be an engine of innovation, but it is much criticized today. Is a one-size-fits all model for patent duration appropriate in today's technological environment or does it simply incentivize unnecessary litigation? For instance, the rapid pace of...

  • April 17, 2015

    Given that everyone is getting older and more prone to disease, medical innovation is one of the most important measures, if not the most important measure, of a successful health policy. Technological acceleration, including advances in genomics and stem cell research, suggest that we are on...

  • April 17, 2015

    Regulation can be a significant barrier to innovation, protecting incumbents and making it harder to bring new goods and services to market. Determining the appropriate regulation is all the more difficult when accelerating technology is creating many new opportunities as well as potential...

  • April 7, 2015

    Becky Norton Dunlop’s duties and travel itinerary as The Heritage Foundation’s vice president for external relations have made her the think tank's “chief ambassador” outside the Beltway.

  • April 7, 2015

    With commentary by Professor Tom Ginsburg

  • April 6, 2015

    The Supreme Court's federalism battleground has recently shifted from the Commerce Clause to two textually marginal but substantively important domains: the Necessary and Proper Clause and, to a lesser extent, the General Welfare Clause. For nearly a decade, these quieter, more structurally...

  • March 30, 2015

    Commentary by Bigelow Fellow Genevieve Lakier

  • March 19, 2015

    Access Justice laws give people equal opportunity to enjoy primary goods, ensuring that access to these goods is not allocated by markets and is not tilted in favor of wealth and privilege.

  • March 16, 2015

    At her confirmation hearing, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan said that "we are all originalists." Is that true, and what would it mean for it to be true? In Is Originalism Our Law?, I argue that there is an important sense in which Justice Kagan was right.