Forbes Article by Mark Chenoweth '99 on Federal Discovery Rules Reform

From Forbes.com:

With the conclusion of the Federal Rules Advisory Committee’s public comment period last month, the first leg of what The Legal Pulse has described as the long and winding road to reform of the federal rules for discovery is now over. We have at last reached the “end of the beginning,” to borrow Churchill’s phrase.

Comments contributed by the business community conveyed the consistent message that the current rules encourage over-preserving documents, a practice that ill-serves the interests of justice. The committee record is replete with anecdotes demonstrating this point, but it had lacked aggregate data until recently. Enter a Preservation Costs Survey conducted by Professor William Hubbard (my former contemporary at the University of Chicago Law School who has returned to teach there now), which thoroughly documents systematic over-preservation of electronic materials and its profound costs. A summary of Professor Hubbard’s findings is available here.

Business Defendants’ Stories. In its comment to the Advisory Committee, 307,000-employee General Electric noted that in order to preserve information contained in emails alone, it is “faced with a universe of approximately 4,770 terabytes” of data. (Just 10 terabytes, by comparison, is roughly enough storage for the Library of Congress’s entire book collection.)  The comment cited one example from 2011 in an instance where litigation had not yet been filed. GE incurred “fees of $5.4 million to collect and preserve 3.8 million documents totaling 16 million pages.” The company also reported it must spend over $100,000 a year to simply maintain those documents.

Read the rest of the article.