Alumni News

Arielle Tokorcheck, '11, Joins Hall, Render, Killian, Heath, & Lyman

February 26, 2015 - 9:44am

Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, the largest health care focused law firm in the nation, is pleased to announce associate attorney Arielle Tokorcheck, J.D., has joined the firm's Indianapolis office.

Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, the largest health care focused law firm in the nation, is pleased to announce associate attorney Arielle Tokorcheck, J.D., has joined the firm's Indianapolis office.

Tokorcheck practices largely within the firm's Supply Chain Procurement, Operations & Management practice area, assisting with contracting and compliance matters affecting hospitals and health systems. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame in 2008 and received her law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 2011, where she served as board member for the school's Health Law Society.

Tokorcheck is admitted to practice in California and Michigan and is a member of the American Health Lawyers Association and the California Society for Healthcare Attorneys.

Categories: Alumni News

Renee Newman Knake, '99, Named Inaugural Foster Swift Professor in Legal Ethics at Michigan State University College of Law

February 23, 2015 - 11:12am

Professor Knake’s teaching and scholarship focus on the ethical and regulatory structures which govern the practice of law.

Original source: 

http://www.law.msu.edu/news/2015/Foster-Swift-Names-Professorship.html

Michigan State University College of Law Dean Joan W. Howarth recently announced a generous award from the law firm Foster Swift Collins & Smith.

The award provides support to create and name the Foster Swift Professor of Legal Ethics for a five-year term. This professorship will be held by Professor Renee Newman Knake, co-director of the Kelley Institute of Ethics and the Legal Profession.

“It’s vital that our students be taught by the best legal minds so they are prepared to take on the challenges of the evolving legal profession,” Dean Howarth said. “I’m grateful to Foster Swift for also recognizing the importance of investing in our faculty.”

Categories: Alumni News

Calvin Campbell, '51, Longtime Illinois Appellate Judge, Dies

February 23, 2015 - 9:38am

In November 1978, he became the fourth African-American elected to the Illinois Appellate Court.

Original source: 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-calvin-campbell-obituary-met-20150...

In his early 20s, Calvin Campbell saw college as a nearly impossible dream for an African-American in the segregated South during the Depression, his family said.

He had returned from combat in World War II permanently scarred — losing a finger and part of his left hand — and it took a wily Army guidance counselor to convince this battle-scarred veteran to try college for a semester, said Mr. Campbell's daughter, Cathy.

"She told him, 'You can always quit.' But she must have seen something in my father that made her believe in him."

Mr. Campbell went on to graduate with a bachelor's degree from Howard University in Washington in 1948, and then earned a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1951.

In November 1978, he became the fourth African-American elected to the Illinois Appellate Court.

Categories: Alumni News

Thelma Brook Simon, '40, 1916-2015

February 20, 2015 - 9:49am

She graduated from the University of Chicago law school in 1940, and was one of only two women in her class, her son said.

Original source: 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/wilmette/news/ct-wml-thelma-simon-...

Family, colleagues and friends of former Wilmette Trustee Thelma Brook Simon remembered her this week as a brilliant and passionate woman who was dedicated to the legal profession, civic activism in Wilmette and her family.

Simon, who served on the Village Board during a tumultuous time in the 1960s and helped end the caucus system and begin the current era of municipal term limits, died Feb. 7 at the age of 98.

[...]

Thelma Brook Simon was born in Chicago in 1916 and graduated from Senn High School before graduating with Phi Beta Kappa honors from the University of Illinois. She later graduated from the University of Chicago law school in 1940, and was one of only two women in her class, her son said.

Categories: Alumni News

Brett M. Doran, '05, Elevated to Shareholder at Greenberg Traurig

February 19, 2015 - 10:49am

Doran is a member of the Litigation Practice and concentrates on commercial litigation, with an emphasis on class action, securities, and financial services industry litigation.

Original source: 

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/02/prweb12526851.htm

The international law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP announced the elevation of Brett M. Doran, Jason B. Elster, Tiffany S. Fordyce, Marc E. Harrison, Keith R. Jarosik, Meredith L. Katz, and Edward R. Winkofsky to shareholder in its Chicago office.

Doran is a member of the Litigation Practice and concentrates on commercial litigation, with an emphasis on class action, securities, and financial services industry litigation. He earned his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School and his B.A. from Indiana University.

Categories: Alumni News

Marvin A. Chirelstein, '53, 1928-2015

February 19, 2015 - 10:31am

Marvin A. Chirelstein, a leading scholar of federal taxation, corporate law, and contracts whose textbooks are still used by students across the country, died on Feb. 16. He was 86.

Original source: 

http://www.law.columbia.edu/marvin-chirelstein/623309

Columbia Law School Professor Emeritus Marvin A. Chirelstein, a leading scholar of federal taxation, corporate law, and contracts whose textbooks are still used by students across the country, died on Feb. 16. He was 86.

Chirelstein first joined Columbia Law School in 1954 to work on the Federal Income Tax Project under Dean William C. Warren. He then joined the government as an attorney in the U.S. Department of the Treasury and later taught at Rutgers School of Law and Yale Law School. Chirelstein returned to Columbia Law School as a visiting professor in 1981 and became a full-time faculty member in 1984. Two years later, he was named the first Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, an appointment announced by then-Columbia University President Michael I. Sovern ’55.

In addition to being a highly sought after academic expert on taxation, contracts, and corporate law, Chirelstein was a beloved professor who once taught a seminar on the legal side of one of his favorite sports: boxing. A music lover who played the violin, he was known for his dry sense of humor and quiet wit and was adored by students. Two of his textbooks, Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts and Federal Income Taxation: A Law Student’s Guide to the Leading Cases and Concepts, have guided generations of future lawyers through the complexities of the law. A third,Cases and Materials on Corporate Finance, opened the way to interdisciplinary analysis of corporate law.

Categories: Alumni News

Donald Bernstein, '78, Receives Judge Joseph M. Proskauer Award from UJA-Federation

February 17, 2015 - 9:29am

The UJA-Federation of New York recognized Davis Polk partner Donald Bernstein for his philanthropic work with the Judge Joseph M. Proskauer Award.

The UJA-Federation of New York recognized Davis Polk partner Donald Bernstein for his philanthropic work with the Judge Joseph M. Proskauer Award. The award, the most prestigious accolade given by the UJA-Federation to members of the legal community, is presented to lawyers who have shown profound commitment to philanthropy as well as to the highest ideals of the law. Davis Polk Managing Partner Thomas Reid presented Bernstein with the award at the UJA-Federation’s annual Lawyers Division event on February 10, 2015.

Categories: Alumni News

Himonas, '89, Unanimously Confirmed to the Utah Supreme Court

February 17, 2015 - 9:26am

Himonas, who is Greek Orthodox, will be the only non-Mormon on the state's high court. He has served as a judge in the 3rd District Court for a decade.

Original source: 

http://www.sltrib.com/home/2177583-155/himonas-unanimously-confirmed-to-...

The Utah Senate on Friday confirmed Constandinos Himonas to the state Supreme Court on a 27-0 vote.

Himonas, who is Greek Orthodox, will be the only non-Mormon on the state's high court. He has served as a judge in the 3rd District Court for a decade.

After his confirmation, Himonas told the Senate that its gallery was full of his family. "It is truly my Big Fat Greek Confirmation proceeding."

He told the Senate, "I am deeply, deeply committed to a textual approach to legislation that comes out of this body and the House, and an originalist approach to both the constitution of this state and the Constitution of the United States."

Categories: Alumni News

Eric William Waldo, '06, Marries Katherine Ann Bradley

February 16, 2015 - 4:43pm

Katherine Ann Bradley and Eric William Waldo were married Saturday evening at the InterContinental San Juan, a hotel in Puerto Rico.

Original source: 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/style/a-couple-finds-their-bearings.html

Katherine Ann Bradley and Eric William Waldo were married Saturday evening at the InterContinental San Juan, a hotel in Puerto Rico. The Rev. Aran Santana, a minister of the Missionary Churches of Christ, led a ceremony that included Catholic and Jewish wedding traditions. Colin J. Callahan, a friend of the couple, took part.

The bride, 30, is taking her husband's name. She is a trip coordinator for President Obama at the White House, helping plan his domestic and international travel. She graduated from Creighton University.

She is the daughter of Jenny A. Bradley and Andy D. Bradley of Omaha. Her father is the executive vice president for marketing and development for Goodwill Industries in Omaha. Her mother is a preschool teacher in Omaha for Holy Name School, a Roman Catholic grammar school.

The groom, 36, also works at the White House, as the executive director of Michelle Obama’s Reach Higher initiative, which encourages young people to pursue and complete their education past high school. He graduated from Brown University and received a master’s degree from Harvard University and a law degree from the University of Chicago.

Categories: Alumni News

Ashwini Vittalachar, LLM '07, Promoted to Partner at Samvad

February 11, 2015 - 4:07pm

Delhi-based Vittalachar handles general corporate, M&A, private equity and employment law work at the firm.

Original source: 

http://www.legallyindia.com/Law-firms/samvad-promotes-two-to-partnership

Samvad partners promoted senior associates Ashwini Vittalachar and Apurva Jayant to the partnership effective 1 April, taking its total number of partners to 9.

Delhi-based Vittalachar handles general corporate, M&A, private equity and employment law work at the firm. She is a ULC Bangalore 2006 alum who joined the firm in 2007 after completing her LLM from the University of Chicago’s law school.

Categories: Alumni News

Deno Himonas, '89, Recommended for Utah Supreme Court

February 11, 2015 - 11:12am

The Senate Judicial Confirmation Committee voted Tuesday to recommend that 3rd District Judge Constandinos "Deno" Himonas be confirmed for a spot on the Utah Supreme Court.

Original source: 

http://www.sltrib.com/news/2163886-155/judge-deno-himonas-gets-nod-from

The Senate Judicial Confirmation Committee voted Tuesday to recommend that 3rd District Judge Constandinos "Deno" Himonas be confirmed for a spot on the Utah Supreme Court.

The vote was 7-0 to approve Himonas, who was nominated by Gov. Gary Herbert to fill the vacancy created by the Feb. 1 retirement of Justice Ronald Nehring. A vote by the entire Utah Senate on the confirmation is expected to take place Friday.

If approved, Himonas, who is Greek Orthodox, would be the only non-Mormon on the Supreme Court.

Categories: Alumni News

Mick Lauter, '06, Elected to Partner at Sheppard Mullin

February 10, 2015 - 4:05pm

Mick Lauter is a member of the Finance and Bankruptcy practice group in the San Francisco office.

Original source: 

http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/sheppard-mullin-elects-eleven-a...

LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 10, 2015) - Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton LLP is pleased to announce that the firm has elevated eleven of its attorneys to partner. The new partners are William F. Ahmann (Palo Alto), Christopher J. Collins (New York), Pankit J. Doshi (San Francisco), Morgan Forsey (San Francisco), Kenneth D. Fox (Orange County), Michael M. Lauter (San Francisco), Amy L. McEvoy (Los Angeles), Marlene M. Nicolas (Los Angeles), James. E. Pugh (Los Angeles), Jeffrey F. Rector (Del Mar) and Zachary M. Turke (Los Angeles).

[...]

Mick Lauter is a member of the Finance and Bankruptcy practice group in the San Francisco office. Lauter specializes in bankruptcy, creditor's rights, receiverships, workouts and foreclosures. His practice includes representing debtors, creditors and committees in bankruptcy, representing lenders and special servicers in workouts, foreclosures and receiverships, and representing state and federal court receivers. Lauter also has significant experience representing lenders in real estate and asset based financings, and representing buyers in real estate purchases and sales. Lauter received his J.D. from University of Chicago Law School in 2006 and his undergraduate degree, Phi Beta Kappa, from University of California in 2001.

Categories: Alumni News

Mark Chenoweth, '99, on the Supreme Court's Role Regarding ACA Tax Credits

February 9, 2015 - 2:31pm

King v. Burwell is precisely the sort of case that the Supreme Court is supposed to decide.

Original source: 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/wlf/2015/02/06/linda-greenhouses-blatant-effort-to-invoke-greenhouse-effect-in-affordable-care-act-case-fails/

Linda Greenhouse is at it again. The New York Times Supreme Court reporter-turned-opinion writer is deeply troubled by the possibility that the Supreme Court may actually construe the Affordable Care Act precisely as Congress wrote it. And she is up to her old tricks of trying to influence the justices by suggesting that they “will have a great deal of explaining to do—not to me, but to history” if they strike down the proposed IRS rule at issue in the case.

Now that the Supreme Court has agreed to decide the proper scope of tax credits available under the law, Ms. Greenhouse laments, “[n]ot only the Affordable Care Act but the court itself is in peril as a result.” Chief Justice Roberts, by her lights, “saved the day” last time around. “The fate of the statute hung in the balance then and hangs in the balance today,” she continues, but “… [t]his time, so does the honor of the Supreme Court.”

And yet King v. Burwell is precisely the sort of case that the Supreme Court is supposed to decide. Not only does it raise an issue of exceptional importance—whether the IRS is permitted to appropriate billions of dollars in tax credits each year absent an express authorization from Congress to do so—but the Fourth and D.C. Circuits have issued conflicting decisions on that question, and only the Supreme Court can resolve such a conflict.

Categories: Alumni News

Lisa Ellman, '05, Is Shaping the Nation's Policy on Drones

February 4, 2015 - 11:21am

Lisa Ellman has been quietly working to craft policy that will make it possible for commercial drones to be flown in the US.

Original source: 

http://fortune.com/2015/02/04/obama-lisa-ellman-drones/

When Lisa Ellman was eight years old, she drafted a policy document for her family. She called it her Magna Carta—and it was primarily designed to keep her two annoying younger brothers in check. Ellman’s document levied a fine for saying mean words like “dummy” and for engaging in wild behavior like “pinching your older sister.”

“It was pretty effective,” Ellman says with a laugh. “My parents were responsible for implementing it and they did a great job.”

The Ellman household’s Magna Carta is no longer in effect, but its creator remains a policymaking junky. Now 36, Ellman has spent the past ten years working for Barack Obama. As a co-chair of Washington-based law firm McKenna Long & Aldridge’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Practice Group, she’s currently working with the Obama Administration to encourage policymaking efforts that will allow commercial drones to be flown in U.S. airspace.

Categories: Alumni News

Andrew Patner, EX ’88, 1959-2015

February 3, 2015 - 2:31pm

Patner was most recently a critic-at-large for WFMT-FM and a contributing critic for the Chicago Sun-Times.

Original source: 

http://chicago.suntimes.com/entertainment/7/71/340586/music-critic-andrew-patner-dead-age-55

Classical music writer Andrew Patner died suddenly Tuesday morning.

Patner was most recently a critic-at-large for WFMT-FM and a contributing critic for the Chicago Sun-Times.

Versatile and seemingly connected to everyone in Chicago’s arts community, Mr. Patner could discuss anything from the best place to get Chinese food in Hyde Park to set design at the Lyric opera to the need for some longtime musicians to acknowledge diminished skills.

A native Chicagoan with deep roots in Hyde Park, he previously worked at Chicago magazine and reported for the Wall Street Journal in the 1980s.

He studied at the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin, according to his biography at the Chicago Arts Critics Association. He also wrote the book, “I.F Stone: A Portrait,” and won a Lisagor award for his coverage of race and politics connected to the mayoral race of Mayor Harold Washington.

Categories: Alumni News

Ashish Prasad, '93, Shares Lessons on Launching a Legal Technology Startup

January 29, 2015 - 9:24am

After careful analysis and developing a  business plan, in 2008 I took a leave of absence from the firm to form a document review and electronic discovery company called Discovery Services.

Original source: 

http://www.lawtechnologynews.com/latest-news/id=1202716218037/Vendor-Voice-So-You-Want-to-Launch-a-Legal-Technology-Startup?mcode=1395244994797&curindex=0&slreturn=20150029101206

I am a legal technology entrepreneur. I started my career like many other lawyers. When I graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 1993,  I followed the traditional path to a clerkship with the Micigan Supreme Court, and then to Mayer Brown as an associate. In 2003, I was promoted to litigation partner, and in the same year, I became the founder and chair of the electronic discovery and records management practice. 

After five years in these roles, something changed in how I viewed my career.  I noticed that there was a need for a different approach to electronic data discovery than what law firms were offering, and I thought I could help fill the need.  After careful analysis and developing a  business plan, in 2008 I took a leave of absence from the firm to form a document review and electronic discovery company called Discovery Services.

Shortly after we launched, DS grew through help from my friends in the EDD, law firm and corporate legal communities. We had a great staff and helped our clients manage the often burdensome process of document review. Here are takeaways that I learned along the way, in the hopes of helping other aspiring legal entrepreneurs...

Categories: Alumni News

Matt Maxwell, '08, To Appear in Chicago Debut of 'The Other Place'

January 26, 2015 - 11:10am

The production runs February 13 - April 5, 2015 at Profiles Theatre's The Main Stage.

Original source: 

http://www.broadwayworld.com/chicago/article/THE-OTHER-PLACE-to-Make-Chicago-Premiere-at-Profiles-Theatre-213-45-20150123

Profiles Theatre continues its 26th Season with the Chicago premiere of The Other Place by Sharr White, directed by Artistic Director Joe Jahraus. The production runs February 13 - April 5, 2015 at Profiles Theatre's The Main Stage, 4139 N. Broadway. The press opening is Thursday, February 19 at 8pm.

In Sharr White's acclaimed new drama The Other Place, Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist, finds her life coming apart at the seams. Her husband filed for divorce, her daughter eloped with a much older man and her own health hangs in jeopardy. But in this brilliantly crafted work, nothing is as it seems. Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present and the elusive truth about Juliana boils to the surface.

[...]

Directed by Profiles Artistic Director Joe Jahraus, the cast of The Other Place features guest artist Lia D. Mortensen as Julianna. Lia was most recently seen in Pericles with Chicago Shakespeare Theatre and was seen last season at Profiles in their Midwest premiere of Annapurna. Also featured are guest artists George Infantado, Matt Maxwell, Nina O'Keefe, Steve Silver and Autumn Teague.

Categories: Alumni News

Steven C. Todrys, '78, Joins Evercore as a Senior Advisor

January 22, 2015 - 3:23pm

Evercore announced today that Steven C. Todrys has joined the Firm’s Investment Banking business as a Senior Advisor with a focus on transactional tax and structuring solutions.

Original source: 

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/steven-c-todrys-joins-evercore-as-a-senior-advisor-2015-01-22?reflink=MW_news_stmp

NEW YORK, Jan 22, 2015 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Evercore announced today that Steven C. Todrys has joined the Firm’s Investment Banking business as a Senior Advisor with a focus on transactional tax and structuring solutions. He will be based in Evercore’s office in New York.

Mr. Todrys was most recently a partner at the law firm of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, where he had served as the head of the firm’s tax practice. There, he provided tax advice on many significant and complex transactions, including the sale by Vodafone of its indirect interest in Verizon Wireless, the split-off of Mosaic from Cargill, the acquisition by Mars of Wrigley, the sale of Wyeth to Pfizer, and numerous buyout transactions by KKR, Hellman & Friedman and Silver Lake. Mr. Todrys is a past chair of the Tax Section of the New York State Bar Association. He holds a JD from the University of Chicago Law School and a BA from the University of Rochester.

Ralph Schlosstein, Evercore’s Chief Executive Officer, said, “We are delighted to welcome Steve to Evercore where his experience and expertise will help us to provide the most sophisticated transaction structuring advice to our clients across all of the industry groups we serve.”

Steven Todrys said, “I am looking forward to using the experience I have developed in my 35 years as a tax lawyer to help Evercore’s clients achieve their business objectives. Evercore’s client focus and philosophy coupled with its leading advisory capabilities provide a great platform to serve the clients’ strategic needs.”

Categories: Alumni News

Adam Bonin, ’97, Begins Column in Philadelphia Magazine

January 20, 2015 - 2:54pm

In his first column for Philadelphia Magazine, Adam Bonin calls for an end to the judicial fundraising charade.

Original source: 

http://www.phillymag.com/citified/2015/01/20/judicial-fundraising-charade/

Adam Bonin, ’97, is a new columnist with Philadelphia Magazine. In his first column, he calls for an end to the "judicial fundraising charade":

It’s a part of the campaign process which gives many a sense of the oogies; the relentless quest for cash in which candidates for office call their friends, colleagues, former colleagues, ideological sympathizers, anyone who’s given money to people like them, anyone who might have a beef with the other candidates, and then, inevitably, all these same people again next week.

It’s especially uncomfortable when it comes to candidates for judicial office, because judges are supposed to be impartial, and as the U.S. Court of Appeals explained in 1991:

It is no secret that aside from family and close personal friends of the candidate (rarely affluent, or necessarily enthusiastic sources) judicial campaigns must focus their solicitations for funds on members of the bar. This leads to the unseemly situation in which judges preside over cases in which the parties are represented by counsel who have contributed in varying amounts to the judicial campaigns.

Pennsylvania, like most states which elect judges, tries to take some of the ickiness out of the process by preventing judges (and judicial candidates, but I’ll just say “judges” from here) from raising the money themselves. The Rules of Judicial Conduct expressly prohibit such personal solicitations; money can only be raised by members of the judge’s campaign committee instead.

In practice, however, the phone calls go like this...

Categories: Alumni News

Henry G. Manne, '52, 1928-2015

January 20, 2015 - 1:02pm

A towering figure in legal education, Manne was one of the founders of the Law and Economics movement, the 20th century’s most important and influential legal academic discipline.

Henry Girard Manne died on January 17, 2015 at the age of 86. A towering figure in legal education, Manne was one of the founders of the Law and Economics movement, the 20th century’s most important and influential legal academic discipline.

Manne is survived by his wife, Bobbie Manne; his children, Emily and Geoffrey Manne; two grandchildren, Annabelle and Lily Manne; and two nephews, Neal and Burton Manne. He was preceded in death by his parents, Geoffrey and Eva Manne, and his brother, Richard Manne.

Henry Manne was born on May 10, 1928, in New Orleans. The son of merchant parents, he was raised in Memphis, Tennessee. He attended Central High School in Memphis, and graduated with a BA in economics from Vanderbilt University in 1950. Manne received a JD from the University of Chicago in 1952, and a doctorate in law (SJD) from Yale University in 1966. He also held honorary degrees from Seattle University, Universidad Francesco Marroquin in Guatemala and George Mason University.

Following law school Manne served in the Air Force JAG Corps, stationed at Chanute Air Force Base in Illinois and McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. He practiced law briefly in Chicago before beginning his teaching career at St. Louis University in 1956. In subsequent years he also taught at the University of Wisconsin, George Washington University, the University of Rochester, Stanford University, the University of Miami, Emory University, George Mason University, the University of Chicago, and Northwestern University.

Throughout his career Henry Manne ’s writings originated, developed or anticipated an extraordinary range of ideas and themes that have animated the past forty years of law and economics scholarship. For his work, Manne was named a Life Member of the American Law and Economics Association and, along with Nobel Laureate Ronald Coase, and federal appeals court judges Richard Posner and Guido Calabresi, one of the four Founders of Law and Economics.

In the 1950s and 60s Manne pioneered the application of economic principles to the study of corporations and corporate law, authoring seminal articles that transformed the field. His article, “Mergers and the Market for Corporate Control,” published in 1965, is credited with opening the field of corporate law to economic analysis and with anticipating what has come to be known as the Efficient Market Hypothesis (for which economist Eugene Fama was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2013). Manne’s 1966 book, Insider Trading and the Stock Market was the first scholarly work to challenge the logic of insider trading laws, and remains the most influential book on the subject today.

In 1968 Manne moved to the University of Rochester with the aim of starting a new law school. Manne anticipated many of the current criticisms that have been aimed at legal education in recent years, and proposed a law school that would provide rigorous training in the economic analysis of law as well as specialized training in specific areas of law that would prepare graduates for practice immediately out of law school. Manne’s proposal for a new law school, however, drew the ire of incumbent law schools in upstate New York, which lobbied against accreditation of the new program.

While at Rochester, in 1971, Manne created the “Economics Institute for Law Professors,” in which, for the first time, law professors were offered intensive instruction in microeconomics with the aim of incorporating economics into legal analysis and theory. The Economics Institute was later moved to the University of Miami when Manne founded the Law &Economics Center there in 1974. While at Miami, Manne also began the John M. Olin Fellows Program in Law and Economics, which provided generous scholarships for professional economists to earn a law degree. That program (and its subsequent iterations) has gone on to produce dozens of professors of law and economics, as well as leading lawyers and influential government officials.

The creation of the Law & Economics Center (which subsequently moved to Emory University and then to George Mason Law School, where it continues today), was one of the foundational events in the Law and Economics Movement. Of particular importance to the development of US jurisprudence, its offerings were expanded to include economics courses for federal judges. At its peak a third of the federal bench and four members of the Supreme Court had attended at least one of its programs, and every major law school in the country today counts at least one law and economics scholar among its faculty. Nearly every legal field has been influenced by its scholarship and teaching.

When Manne became Dean of George Mason Law School in Arlington, Virginia, in 1986, he finally had the opportunity to implement the ideas he had originally developed at Rochester. Manne’s move to George Mason united him with economist James Buchanan, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1986 for his path-breaking work in the field of Public Choice economics, and turned George Mason University into a global leader in law and economics. His tenure as dean of George Mason, where he served as dean until 1997 and George Mason University Foundation Professor until 1999, transformed legal education by integrating a rigorous economic curriculum into the law school, and he remade George Mason Law School into one of the most important law schools in the country. The school’s Henry G. Manne Moot Court Competition for Law & Economics and the Henry G. Manne Program in Law and Economics Studies are named for him.

Manne was celebrated for his independence of mind and respect for sound reasoning and intellectual rigor, instead of academic pedigree. Soon after he left Rochester to start the Law and Economics Center, he received a call from Yale faculty member Ralph Winter (who later became a celebrated judge on the United States Court of Appeals) offering Manne a faculty position. As he recounted in an interview several years later, Manne told Winter, “Ralph, you’re two weeks and five years too late.” When Winter asked Manne what he meant, Manne responded, “Well, two weeks ago, I agreed that I would start this new center on law and economics.” When Winter asked, “And five years?” Manne responded, “And you’re five years too late for me to give a damn.”

The academic establishment’s slow and skeptical response to the ideas of law and economics eventually persuaded Manne that reform of legal education was unlikely to come from within the established order and that it would be necessary to challenge the established order from without. Upon assuming the helm at George Mason, Dean Manne immediately drew to the school faculty members laboring at less-celebrated law schools whom Manne had identified through his economics training seminars for law professors, including several alumni of his Olin Fellows programs. Today the law school is recognized as one of the world’s leading centers of law and economics.

Throughout his career, Manne was an outspoken champion of free markets and liberty. His intellectual heroes and intellectual peers were classical liberal economists like Friedrich Hayek, Ludwig Mises, Armen Alchian and Harold Demsetz, and these scholars deeply influenced his thinking. As economist Donald Boudreax said of Dean Manne, “I think what Henry saw in Alchian – and what Henry’s own admirers saw in Henry – was the reality that each unfailingly understood that competition in human affairs is an intrepid force…”

In his teaching, his academic writing, his frequent op-eds and essays, and his work with organizations like the Cato Institute, the Liberty Fund, the Institute for Humane Studies, and the Mont Pelerin Society, among others, Manne advocated tirelessly for a clearer understanding of the power of markets and competition and the importance of limited government and economically sensible regulation.

After leaving George Mason in 1999, Manne remained an active scholar and commenter on public affairs as a frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal. He continued to provide novel insights on corporate law, securities law, and the reform of legal education. Following his retirement Manne became a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Ave Maria Law School in Naples, Florida. The Liberty Fund, of Indianapolis, Indiana, recently published The Collected Works of Henry G. Manne in three volumes.

For some, perhaps more than for all of his intellectual accomplishments Manne will be remembered as a generous bon vivant who reveled in the company of family and friends. He was an avid golfer (who never scheduled a conference far from a top-notch golf course), a curious traveler, a student of culture, a passionate eater (especially of ice cream and Peruvian rotisserie chicken from El Pollo Rico restaurant in Arlington, Virginia), and a gregarious debater (who rarely suffered fools gladly). As economist Peter Klein aptly remarked: “He was a charming companion and correspondent — clever, witty, erudite, and a great social and cultural critic, especially of the strange world of academia, where he plied his trade for five decades but always as a slight outsider.”

Scholar, intellectual leader, champion of individual liberty and free markets, and builder of a great law school—Manne’s influence on law and legal education in the Twentieth Century may be unrivaled. Today, the institutions he built and the intellectual movement he led continue to thrive and to draw sustenance from his intellect and imagination.

There will be a memorial service at George Mason University School of Law in Arlington, Virginia on Friday, February 13, at 4:00 pm. In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations be made in his honor to the Law & Economics Center at George Mason University School of Law, 3301 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22201 or online at http://www.masonlec.org.

Categories: Alumni News