Alumni News

Jon Lerner, '95: To Serve as Deputy UN Ambassador

January 19, 2017 - 4:59pm

Nikki Haley, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for UN Ambassador, has selected Jon Lerner, '95 to be her deputy.

Original source: 

http://jewishinsider.com/10389/jon-lerner-to-...

Nikki Haley, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for UN Ambassador, has selected Jon Lerner to be her deputy, according to FITSNews, a South Carolina political website. The selection was first reported by New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman, citing several sources.

A veteran advisor to the South Carolina Governor, Lerner, who is Jewish, has worked with numerous GOP clients including Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Tim Scott (R-SC). Lerner is considered a staunch conservative. Former First Lady Jenny Sanford told McClatchy Newspapers in 2010, “He works for clients who he believes in and who reflect his own ideological principles. That provides him a sense of purpose and integrity and focus that is lacking in other consultants.”

Throughout the 2016 Presidential race, Lerner played a key role in the NeverTrump campaign, Politico reported in March. Working as a senior strategist for the Washington-based Club for Growth, the group started airing ads against Trump during the fall of 2014 in Iowa. Club for Growth intensified its efforts against the New York businessman spending millions on ads in key states of Florida and Illinois.

Continue reading: http://jewishinsider.com/10389/jon-lerner-to-serve-as-deputy-un-ambassador/

Categories: Alumni News

Amanda Jester, '03: Named to Ambulatory M&A Advisor Leading Lawyers List

January 18, 2017 - 2:00pm

Amanda K. Jester, '03, partner and member of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP's Board of Directors (Austin), has been named to the Ambulatory M&A Advisor annual Leading Lawyers list.

Original source: 

http://m.marketwired.com/press-release/waller...

Three attorneys from Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, a leading provider of legal services to the healthcare, financial services, technology, retail and hospitality industries, have been named to the Ambulatory M&A Advisor annual Leading Lawyers list

The attorneys are:

  • Amanda K. Jester, partner and member of Waller's Board of Directors (Austin)
  • George W. Bishop III, partner (Nashville)
  • Matthew R. Burnstein, partner and chairman of Waller's Board of Directors (Nashville)

"Our work with healthcare clients has brought many accolades to Waller this year, and we can credit that to our expansive roster of dedicated attorneys," said Ken Marlow, Chair of Waller's nationally recognized Healthcare Department. "We are honored for Amanda, George and Matt to be named to the Leading Lawyers list, as we continue our commitment to serving the healthcare industry."

The Leading Lawyers list designates lawyers who have achieved a high degree of recognition and success within the healthcare transaction field with at least 10 years of experience.

Amanda Jester represents private equity funds, hospitals, free-standing emergency centers, surgery centers, physician practices, dental practices and specialized service providers in mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures. Amanda specializes in physician practice mergers and acquisitions and has represented both physician practices and investors in consolidations and private equity platform transactions. Jester graduated with a B.A. in Philosophy from Austin College and earned her J.D. at the University of Chicago Law School.

Categories: Alumni News

Kathleen Salvaty, '96: New Systemwide Title IX Coordinator for the University of California

January 13, 2017 - 10:16am

The University of California tannounced the appointment of Kathleen Salvaty, '96 to fill the new position of systemwide Title IX coordinator, reporting directly to President Janet Napolitano in a role that will lead efforts against sexual violence and sexual harassment throughout the University.

Original source: 

https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-...

The University of California today (Jan. 12) announced the appointment of Kathleen Salvaty to fill the new position of systemwide Title IX coordinator, reporting directly to President Janet Napolitano in a role that will lead efforts against sexual violence and sexual harassment throughout the University.

Salvaty, an attorney who most recently worked as Title IX coordinator at UCLA, will direct the University’s ongoing efforts to change the culture around issues of sexual violence and sexual harassment. This includes education, prevention, adjudication and sanctioning in such matters involving faculty, students and staff. In conjunction with campus chancellors and leaders at UC medical centers and labs, she will oversee local Title IX coordinators to ensure coordination, consistency and timeliness in implementing University policy.

“Hiring Kathleen is a critical next step in making sure our recently overhauled policies to prevent, adjudicate and sanction sexual misconduct at UC are properly, and consistently, carried out,” Napolitano said. “Her deep expertise and leadership in Title IX compliance will ensure the University remains at the forefront of advancements in this complex area and that each member of our UC community feels safe and respected.”

Continue reading: https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-...

Categories: Alumni News

The Honorable Danny Boggs, '68: Semi-Retiring from Federal Court Bench

January 12, 2017 - 10:55am

Judge Danny J. Boggs, '68, of the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, recently announced that he will assume senior status, creating a vacancy on the federal bench for the next president to fill.

Original source: 

http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/former-bg-att...

Judge Danny J. Boggs of the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals recently announced that he will assume senior status, creating a vacancy on the federal bench for the next president to fill.

Born in Cuba and raised in Bowling Green, Boggs has served on the appeals court since 1986, when he was appointed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Boggs maintains his chambers in Louisville.

His announcement Tuesday that he will go into semi-retirement effective Feb. 28 means there will be two vacancies on the 16-justice panel. Former Judge Boyce Martin, also from Kentucky, retired in 2013 and died last year.

Categories: Alumni News

Charles Senatore, '80: Elected to the American Law Institute

January 11, 2017 - 11:45am

The American Law Institute has elected 58 new members, including Charles Senatore, '80, Exec. VP & Head of Regulatory Coordination and Strategy for Fidelity Investments.

Original source: 

https://www.ali.org/news/articles/january-201...

The American Law Institute has elected 58 new members. These highly regarded judges, lawyers, and law professors will bring a wide range of perspectives and areas of expertise to ALI’s work of clarifying the law through Restatements, Principles, and Model Codes.

“I have the great luck of welcoming each class of new members,” said ALI President Roberta Cooper Ramo. “Each group of lawyers, accomplished in their own fields and professions, brings new experience and new perspectives to our work of clarifying the law. I look forward to greeting our new members as I hand over the gavel to Dean Levi in May.”

Categories: Alumni News

Charles Senatore, '80: Elected to the American Law Institute

January 11, 2017 - 11:44am

The American Law Institute has elected 58 new members, including Charles Senatore, '80, Exec. VP & Head of Regulatory Coordination and Strategy for Fidelity Investments.

Original source: 

https://www.ali.org/news/articles/january-201...

The American Law Institute has elected 58 new members. These highly regarded judges, lawyers, and law professors will bring a wide range of perspectives and areas of expertise to ALI’s work of clarifying the law through Restatements, Principles, and Model Codes.

“I have the great luck of welcoming each class of new members,” said ALI President Roberta Cooper Ramo. “Each group of lawyers, accomplished in their own fields and professions, brings new experience and new perspectives to our work of clarifying the law. I look forward to greeting our new members as I hand over the gavel to Dean Levi in May.”

Categories: Alumni News

Michael Haeberle, '12: Named Partner at Patterson Law Firm

January 9, 2017 - 9:20am

Michael Haeberle, '12, a specialist in commercial litigation issues such as breach of contract, professional liability and legal malpractice -- has been named as a partner at Patterson Law Firm.

Original source: 

http://ilbusinessdaily.com/stories/511067424-...

Michael Haeberle -- a specialist in commercial litigation issues such as breach of contract, professional liability and legal malpractice -- has been named as a partner at Patterson Law Firm.

Haeberle joined the firm in 2014 and is licensed to practice in Illinois and Wisconsin. He earned his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School and and a bachelor of arts from Carleton College in Minnesota.

"Mike is one of the youngest lawyers to be named partner in this or any other firm," Managing Partner Thomas Patterson, managing partner. said. "Clients and juries love him and judges respect him. He is a first-class talent. Mike has worked on challenging cases which have resolved successfully. We look forward to working with him for a long time."

Haeberle also taught elementary school through AmeriCorps and mediated cases in Minneapolis through Community Mediation Services. He is on the LAF Young Professionals Board and is a member of the Illinois Appellate Lawyers Association.

Patterson Law Firm, based in Chicago, handles commercial litigation concerns such as insurance coverage claims, construction contracts and intellectual property litigation. For more information about the firm, visit http://www.pattersonlawfirm.com/.

Categories: Alumni News

Ryan Walsh, '12: Named to Forbes' 30 Under 30 - Law & Policy List

January 6, 2017 - 9:37am

Ryan Walsh, '12, has been selected as one of Forbes' 30 Under 30 in Law & Policy 2017.

Original source: 

http://www.forbes.com/profile/ryan-walsh/

Ryan Walsh

Chief Deputy Solicitor General, Wisconsin Department of Justice

  • Age: 29
  • Residence: Lake Mills, WI
  • Children: 3
  • Education: Bachelor of Arts / Science, Hillsdale College; Doctor of Jurisprudence, University of Chicago
  • Walsh is the Chief Deputy Solicitor General of the state of Wisconsin. His elite resume includes work as an associate at Jones Day, and law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia and the Ninth Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals. He is a summa cum laude graduate of Hillsdale College, and earned his JD at University of Chicago Law School where he was named a Kirkland & Ellis Scholar and was the Editor-in-Chief of the Chicago Law Review.
    Categories: Alumni News

    Regina Merson, '07: "Why This Texas Bankruptcy Lawywer Ditched the Legal Field to Start a Latina-Focused Makeup Line"

    January 5, 2017 - 2:27pm

    Six years after stepping away from the legal field, Mexican-born Dallas entrepreneur Regina Merson, '07, is celebrating Latina glamour with her makeup line, "Reina Rebelde."

    Original source: 

    http://www.dallasnews.com/life/life/2017/01/0...

    Regina Merson always thought about two things when she was a teenager: becoming a lawyer and makeup.

    She believed she could only make a career as an attorney. But after six years working on a makeup idea and stepping away from the legal field, the Mexican-born Dallas entrepreneur is celebrating Latina glamour with her line Reina Rebelde, which means rebel queen.

    It’s a fitting name for her journey.

    She’s currently selling her collection online at reinarebelde.com, with an assortment of products for eyes, brows, face and lips. The highly pigmented colors accentuate a wide range of complexions. Product prices are higher than average drugstore cosmetics but below designer makeup price tags, ranging from $15 to $20.

    The names of her 20 products are in Spanish and the packaging has cultural flair. Her collection suits those looking to achieve a dramatic and glamorous look. Think of Mexican actress and beauty icon Maria Felix and the impeccable brow and eyeliner look she wore with a bold lip color.

    Her love for Mexican culture stems from a childhood in Guadalajara. Merson’s mother moved the family to Dallas after her mother married an American man when Merson was 8.

    Many parts of American culture felt foreign to Merson. Like when kids made fun of her for packing lunches like salchichas con limón(hotdog meat with lime juice). It was so normal in Mexico. What made it any different than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich?

    “You want to fit in. But you’re half pa ca (there), half pa ya (here),” Merson said.

    Education brought her comfort, the self-described book worm said. She found the library to be a safe place and she thrived in school, graduating from Greenhill School in Addison and then attending Yale University for undergrad.

    Moving away to college was hard and she’d get homesick. But she held on to her dreams of becoming a lawyer.

    She graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 2007 and returned to Texas with an attractive job offer at Weil Gotshal & Manges’ Dallas office, which specializes in corporate law.

    Continue reading: http://www.dallasnews.com/life/life/2017/01/0...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Lori Lightfoot, '89: "Leading the Long, Winding Journey to Chicago Police Reform"

    January 3, 2017 - 1:50pm

    Lori Lightfoot, '89, has worked in the U.S. attorney's office, City Hall, and one of Chicago's largest law firms. But as president of the city's police board and chair of Mayor Rahm Emanuel's Police Accountability Task Force, her biggest job to date has been steering the public conversation about local police reform.

    Original source: 

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/201612...

    Lori Lightfoot has worked in the U.S. attorney's office, City Hall and one of Chicago's largest law firms. But as president of the city's police board and chair of Mayor Rahm Emanuel's Police Accountability Task Force, her biggest job to date has been steering the public conversation about local police reform. In the more than two years since the fatal police shooting of Chicago teen Laquan McDonald, perhaps no one has examined the issue as thoroughly as this straight-talking 54-year-old lawyer.

    Her task force sessions were so rigorous that one participant dubbed them "the 'Twelve Angry Men' meetings." Sybil Madison-Boyd, a task force member and program director at the Digital Youth Network project, explains that the tone—akin to defending a graduate dissertation—was set by Lightfoot.

    "There's this part of you that fears her because you know that she has these high standards and she's not going to accept less," Madison-Boyd says. "You don't want to let her down, and you also don't want her to shoot you down."

    But the fate of her task force's 126 recommendations is an open question. The city is still waiting for the results of a U.S. Department of Justice investigation into whether police officers systematically violated citizens' rights. It's also unclear whether the report will have teeth, since no one is sure if President-elect Donald Trump and his attorney general nominee, Sen. Jeff Sessions, will continue the practice of aggressively pursuing agreements that carry the full force of the federal courts.

    Continue reading: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/201612...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Chris Cooley, '11: Appointed Special Assistant for Budget and Finance/Special Projects to Pierce County Executive Team

    January 3, 2017 - 1:45pm

    Incoming Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier has appointed Chris Cooley, '11, to his executive team. Cooley will serve as Special Assistant for Budget and Finance/Special Projects.

    Original source: 

    http://thesubtimes.com/2016/12/30/executive-e...

    Incoming Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier has built his executive team with a focus on ensuring a wide variety of perspectives are heard and constituencies are represented. [He has] announced the following appointment to his executive team:

    Chris Cooley, Special Assistant for Budget and Finance/Special Projects. Chris Cooley is an alumnus of the University of Washington Foster School of Business and the University of Chicago Law School. His prior local and state government experience includes working with the City of the Chicago and the Washington State Legislature. He has called Pierce County home for more than two decades.

    The newly appointed County leaders will assume their roles on Jan. 3, 2017.

    Categories: Alumni News

    Sonja West, '98: Named to New First Amendment Professorship at the University of Georgia

    January 3, 2017 - 1:36pm

    Sonja West, '98, has been named the first holder of the Otis Brumby Distinguished Professorship in First Amendment Law at the University of Georgia.

    Original source: 

    http://www.qconline.com/news/local/q-c-native...

    Quad-Cities native and former Dispatch•Argus reporter Sonja West has been named the first holder of the Otis Brumby Distinguished Professorship in First Amendment Law at the University of Georgia.

    A member of the law faculty, Ms. West also will work with the university's Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication in her new role.

    “Sonja is a distinguished scholar in media law, and it is fitting that she be named to this professorship, which is devoted specifically to teaching and research about the First Amendment,” Georgia Law Dean Peter B. “Bo” Rutledge said in a news release from the university.

    Continue reading: http://www.qconline.com/news/local/q-c-native...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Heidi Mueller, '07: Named Director of Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice

    December 19, 2016 - 10:28am

    Gov. Bruce Rauner has named Heidi Mueller, '07, a veteran Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice professional, to head that agency.

    Original source: 

    http://www.ksdk.com/mb/news/local/illinois/il...

    Gov. Bruce Rauner has named Heidi Mueller, '07, a veteran Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice professional, to head that agency.

    Mueller is currently deputy director of programs at the agency. The Republican governor tabbed her Friday as director of an agency that has gotten more attention recently from Rauner and legislators.

    Continue reading: http://www.ksdk.com/mb/news/local/illinois/il...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Michelle Clark, '99: Will Head King County Flood Control District

    December 15, 2016 - 9:07am

    Michelle Clark, '99, has received the unanimous support of the King County Council to lead the King County Flood Control District as the agency’s Executive Director.

    Original source: 

    http://seattlemedium.com/michelle-clark-head-...

    On Monday, Michelle Clark received the unanimous support of the King County Council to lead the King County Flood Control District as the agency’s Executive Director.

    “I want to thank all the Supervisors for their confidence in appointing me Executive Director,” said Clark. “The Flood District has a strong history of protecting the lives and property of county residents even as we wisely use the funds provided to the District. I look forward to collaborating with Supervisors on our important job of reducing the risk of flooding in rural and urban neighborhoods throughout King County.”

    Clark has been a member of County Councilmember Larry Gossett’s staff, specializing in land use and transportation policy. She has also been the Councilmember’s lead staffer for the Flood District during the years Gossett was the Chair of the District’s Board of Supervisors.

    “Michelle Clark has already proved to be a tremendous asset to the Flood Control District,” said Supervisor Reagan Dunn, Chair of the Flood District’s Board of Supervisors. “I look forward to seeing how her experience and expert knowledge gained while working for Councilmember Gossett will serve her in this new role as Executive Director.”

    Continue reading: http://seattlemedium.com/michelle-clark-head-...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Martha Fineman, '75: Winner of the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lifetime Achievement Award from the AALS Section on Women in Legal Education

    December 12, 2016 - 4:10pm

    Professor Martha Albertson Fineman, '75, is the 2017 winner of the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of American Law Schools Section on Women in Legal Education.

    Original source: 

    https://www.aals.org/aals-newsroom/aals-annou...

    The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) announced the winners of its 2017 awards for excellence in legal education.

    The awards are hosted by sections of the association which are organized around various academic disciplines and topics of interest. The winners will be acknowledged during section programming during the 2017 AALS Annual Meeting, January 3-7 in San Francisco.

    “Sections are an integral part of the AALS community of teachers and scholars and we are proud to present the following awards to these outstanding individuals,” said Kellye Y. Testy, AALS President and Dean of the University of Washington School of Law. “The recipients represent a commitment to the advancement of legal education and we are honored to acknowledge their achievements at the 2017 AALS Annual Meeting.”

    Section on Women in Legal Education Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lifetime Achievement Award
    Martha Albertson Fineman, Emory University School of Law

    Categories: Alumni News

    Ashley Keller, '07: One of Crain's 40 Under 40

    December 5, 2016 - 2:45pm

    Ashley Keller, '07, Managing director of Gerchen Keller Capital, has been named #37 on Crain's 2016 40 Under 40 list.

    Original source: 

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/section/40-und...

    Ashley Keller and Adam Gerchen

    37 and 35 | Managing director (Keller); CEO (Gerchen) | Gerchen Keller Capital

    Adam Gerchen and Ashley Keller co-founded their litigation finance firm three years ago. Now it’s the largest in the industry, with $1.4 billion in assets under management. Gerchen Keller Capital invests in lawsuits, funding them in exchange for a cut of the eventual judgment or settlement, or, in some cases, lending money backed by an existing one. The field has ballooned in recent years as undercapitalized commercial plaintiffs try to match corporations’ legal firepower. The firm averaged a $10 million investment per case in 2015 and worked with clients of law firms like Kirkland & Ellis and Sidley Austin. It’s high-risk, high-reward: Returns can be an eye-popping 91 percent—or nothing.

    For Keller, the work marries his interest in law and finance, creating opportunities to mull over sophisticated legal issues and connect them to questions of value. He would have wanted to do it as a kid if only he’d known the job existed: “Other people can be firefighters and astronauts; I want to be a litigation financier.”

    Though both graduated from elite law schools, the running joke at the 20-full-timer River North firm is that Gerchen has never even taken the bar. He’s a numbers guy who describes himself as “passionate about risk arbitrage, which is an incredibly dorky thing to be passionate about,” who only got the JD to gain an edge in finance. His resume includes a stint at Goldman Sachs; Keller is a former partner at Chicago litigation boutique Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott. They met while working at hedge fund Alyeska Investment Group. Gerchen quit first to start the new firm and braved a couple of nerve-wracking months “getting on a train every day going to an office where I had nothing to do.”

    Outside of work, Gerchen, a father of two, plays squash and guitar. Keller, who has three children, squeezes in swimming and violin, although “if you ask my wife, I don’t do anything else, because even when I’m with my family, my phone is not too far away.”

    Categories: Alumni News

    Peter Altabef, '83: Appointed to President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    December 5, 2016 - 2:36pm

    President Obama announced today his intent to appoint Peter Altabef, '83, to the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee.

    Original source: 

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2...

    Peter Altabef, Appointee for Member, President’s National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee  

    Peter Altabef is President and CEO of the Unisys Corporation, a position he has held since 2015.  Mr. Altabef served as President and CEO of MICROS Systems, Inc. from 2013 to 2014 and as President of Dell Services at Dell, Inc. from 2009 to 2011.  He was the President and CEO of Perot Systems Corporation from 2004 to 2009 and served as Vice President, General Counsel, and Associate General Counsel from 1993 to 2004.  He previously worked as a Partner and Associate at Hughes & Luce LLP from 1985 to 1993.  Mr. Altabef received a B.A. from the State University of New York at Binghamton and a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

    Categories: Alumni News

    William "Jamie" Kunz, '72: 1938-2016

    December 5, 2016 - 9:37am

    William "Jamie" Kunz, '72, a longtime public defender in Cook and DuPage counties, passed away on Nov. 20, 2016.

    Original source: 

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries...

    William "Jamie" Kunz, a longtime public defender in Cook and DuPage counties, kept a client's confession to a murder secret for 26 years, leaving an innocent man in prison for a crime he did not commit.

    Kunz and fellow public defender Dale Coventry held fast to the legal principle of attorney-client privilege until the death of their client, Andrew Wilson, freed them to tell what they knew. Alton Logan, who was serving a life sentence for the crime to which Wilson confessed, was subsequently freed and the charges against him were dismissed.

    "He never wavered in his decision," said Kunz's niece Kristen Vehill. "He believed strongly in the law."

    Kunz, 78, a longtime resident of Winfield, died of cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Wynscape Health and Rehabilitation in Wheaton on Nov. 20, Vehill said.

    Kunz grew up in the Chicago area and graduated from Maine South High School in Park Ridge. He went to Yale University and was working on a doctorate in linguistics at Indiana University when he decided he wanted a career that would be of more service to people.

    He wound up in the Peace Corps and was sent to the African nation of Malawi, where he taught English. He then got a law degree from the University of Chicago and went to work for the Cook County public defender's office.

    Attorney Tom Decker met Kunz when he was in law school and had volunteered for a program which introduced him to attorneys practicing in federal court. "He instinctively knew that he belonged in some sort of pro bono office," Decker said.

    In January 1982, security guard Lloyd Wickliffe was shot to death during a robbery of a South Side McDonald's restaurant. Alton Logan and another man were arrested on the testimony of witnesses and subsequently convicted of the murder.

    At the time, Kunz and Coventry were assistant public defenders representing Wilson, who was charged in the slaying of two Chicago police officers. During interviews, Wilson told the attorneys he shot Wickliffe and that Logan was not involved. Kunz and Coventry recorded the information in a notarized affidavit, which Coventry kept in a locked metal box.

    The two lawyers were bound by attorney-client privilege not to disclose what they knew, but Wilson agreed they could release his statement after his death. Wilson, who wound up serving a life sentence for the police killings, died in prison in November 2007.

    Kunz and Coventry testified in court in early 2008 and Logan walked out of prison in April.

    Vehill said Kunz was firm in his belief that if he didn't honor client confidences, his clients wouldn't trust him. But Vehill said her uncle was surprised by widespread criticism of the decision he and Coventry made.

    "I think he was truly quite unprepared for the reaction," Vehill said.

    Kunz left the Cook County public defender's office in 1994 for DuPage County, where he was a senior public defender, according to friend and former prosecutor John Burg.

    "Jamie was a transformative figure," Burg said. "He saw the good in all people. If there was good in someone, he would make you see it."

    Kunz handled several other high-profile cases over the years. In the 1980s, he defended Hutchie Moore, a former Chicago police officer who shot and killed a judge and an attorney in a Daley Center courtroom after a ruling in a divorce case went against him. Burg said it was just assumed Moore would get the death penalty.

    "Somehow, Jamie got the guy natural life," Burg said. "The state's attorney's office couldn't believe it."

    Kunz also bought a small Chicago firehouse, renting out one half and living in the other, Decker said. "It still had a pole in it," Decker recalled. "As far as I know, nobody was badly injured."

    Survivors include a brother, Pete.

    There will be a memorial gathering 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday at Norris-Segert Funeral Home, 132 Fremont St., West Chicago.

    Categories: Alumni News

    Hon. William Marutani, '53: "An Unsung Hero in the Story of Interracial Marriage"

    November 30, 2016 - 9:37am

    Buried in the footnotes of the story of Mildred and Richard Loving, whose case struck down all interracial-marriage bans throughout the U.S., is the name of William Marutani, '53, who gave Asian-Americans a voice at a pivotal moment in constitutional history.

    Original source: 

    http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-com...

    "At my parents’ wedding, in Blacksburg, Virginia, my mom wore a floppy, wide-brimmed hat atop her feathered hair. My dad wore lightly flared pants and had sideburns that almost reached his jaw. Peter, Paul and Mary music played at their ceremony, and at the reception afterward they drank sherbet punch alongside friends and family members dressed in plaid and platform shoes. It was a fairly ordinary American wedding in 1975, save for one distinction: the bride was white, and the groom was Asian.

    My dad, a third-generation Japanese-American from Los Angeles, and my mom, from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, had met in Michigan, in 1970, while he was in the Air Force and she was in college studying nursing. They eventually settled in Texas, where they raised my three siblings and me. As a gay man, I’ve often thought about how my parents’ timing was fortuitous. Just a few years earlier, their marriage may not have been legal in the state where they wed, Virginia. The new film “Loving,” directed by Jeff Nichols, tells the story of the couple who changed that: Mildred and Richard Loving, a black woman and a white man who were arrested in Virginia in 1958 and sentenced to prison there after marrying in Washington, D.C. The couple, played by Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton, toiled silently for years, unable to live openly together in their home state, until their case reached the Supreme Court—which, in a unanimous decision in 1967, struck down all interracial-marriage bans throughout the U.S.

    The Lovings are the couple whose names we rightfully remember from the case, and they’re indeed the stars of the film. But, buried in the footnotes of the Lovings’ story, a little-known name caught my attention—that of a Japanese-American lawyer who gave Asian-Americans, and families like mine, a voice at a pivotal moment in constitutional history."

    Continue reading: http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-com...

    Categories: Alumni News

    Richard Cordray, '86: "Consumer Protection Bureau Chief Braces for a Reckoning"

    November 29, 2016 - 10:44am

    "Mild-mannered, lawyerly and with a genius for trivia, Richard Cordray, '86, is not the sort of guy you picture at the center of Washington's bitter partisan wars over regulation and consumer safeguards. But there he is, testifying in hearing after hearing on Capitol Hill about the agency he leads, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau."

    Original source: 

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/24/business/co...

    Mild-mannered, lawyerly and with a genius for trivia, Richard Cordray is not the sort of guy you picture at the center of Washington’s bitter partisan wars over regulation and consumer safeguards.

    But there he is, a 57-year-old Buckeye who friends say prefers his hometown diner to a fancy political reception, testifying in hearing after hearing on Capitol Hill about the agency he leads, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Republicans would like to do away with it — and with him, arguing that the agency should be led by a commission rather than one person.

    And with a Republican sweep of Congress and the White House, they may get some or all of what they wish.

    Mr. Cordray, a reluctant Washingtonian who has commuted here for six years from Grove City, Ohio, where his wife and twin children live, is the first director of the consumer watchdog agency, which was created in 2010 after Wall Street’s meltdown. By aggressively deploying his small army of workers — he has 1,600 of them — Mr. Cordray has turned the fledgling agency into one of Washington’s most powerful and pugnacious regulators.

    Categories: Alumni News