Alumni News

Steven Cherny, '91: Joins Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan as a Partner in New York

May 16, 2017 - 10:56am

Steven Cherny, '91, a well-regarded litigator who has spent nearly the past decade at Kirkland & Ellis, has joined Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan as a partner in New York.

Original source: 

http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=120278614...

Steven Cherny, a well-regarded litigator who has spent nearly the past decade at Kirkland & Ellis, has joined Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan as a partner in New York.

Cherny litigates intellectual property cases in a variety of matters, including the consumer products, electronics, financial, pharmaceutical and telecommunications industries. He co-led a Kirkland team in 2015 that won a patent infringement judgment worth nearly $2 billion for vascular graft maker C.R. Bard Inc., a long-running case that a federal trial court judge in Arizona once described as the most complicated she had ever overseen.

The American Lawyer profiled Cherny’s efforts for C.R. Bard in a 2009 feature story about the dispute over ownership of the artificial blood vessel, a technology known as vascular graft. And nearly a year ago, Cherny helped Cisco Systems Inc. achieve a victory before the U.S. International Trade Commission in its ongoing IP war with rival Arista Networks Inc. over three networking patents.

Continue reading: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=120278614...

Categories: Alumni News

Michelle Mbekeani-Wiley, '14: Named to Crain's 20 In Their 20s 2017

May 16, 2017 - 10:53am

Michelle Mbekeani-Wiley, ’14, Community Justice Staff Attorney at Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law, was named to Crain's 20 in their 20s 2017 list.

Original source: 

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/section/20-in-...

Michelle Mbekeani-Wiley specializes in criminal justice issues at Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law. She wrote a report released in February on policing in Chicago Public Schools. She also persuaded officials to establish a polling place in Cook County Jail, where she spearheaded a voter registration drive last summer that registered nearly 1,000. She lives with her husband and 1-year-old son in Oak Park, becoming an Oak Park Township trustee in April. For fun, she sings jazz. Crain's recently talked to her about what led her to law and how it feels to be the child of immigrants today.

CRAIN'S: What made you want to be a lawyer?

MBEKEANI-WILEY: Your typical movies. I'm not going to lie. "A Time to Kill" was such a moving film for me at a young age. Just the complexities of, you're feeling like you want to represent or defend someone who technically broke the law. Then, as I got older, I noticed a common denominator: A lot of politicians and presidents I admire were lawyers. Like Abraham Lincoln.

Continue reading: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/section/20-in-...

Categories: Alumni News

Jana Cohen Barbe, '87: Joins the Global Thinkers Forum Advisory Board

May 16, 2017 - 10:50am

Global Thinkers Forum (GTF) announces that Jana Cohen Barbe, '87, Partner and the former Global Vice Chair of Dentons US LLP, the largest law firm in the world, has joined its Advisory Board.

Original source: 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dento...

Global Thinkers Forum (GTF) announces that Jana Cohen Barbe, Partner and the former Global Vice Chair of Dentons US LLP, the largest law firm in the world, has joined its Advisory Board.

Since Dentons' inception, Jana has been integrally involved in the development and implementation of a strategic vision that created a top tier global legal business with 149 locations in 61 countries.

In addition to serving on the Global Board of Dentons, the Global Advisory Committee and the U.S. Board, Jana chaired the firm's Financial Institutions Sector - the largest sector of the law firm - as well as its pre-eminent real estate practice. Jana advises leading global financial institutions and insurance companies on community development and social investing.

Continue reading: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dento...

Categories: Alumni News

Ross Mansbach ’94: "Q&A: Hiring and Managing Outside Counsel at Halyard Health"

May 9, 2017 - 2:45pm

Ross Mansbach ’94 is the Vice President, Deputy General Counsel and Corporate Secretaty at Halyard Health Inc. He spoke to the Daily Report about the five-lawyer legal department at Halyard and how it goes about hiring and managing outside counsel.

Original source: 

http://m.dailyreportonline.com/#/article/colu...

Ross Mansbach has worked in a big corporate legal department that didn't need outside counsel for a lot of matters because the company had experts for many types of legal challenges. Now he helps run a small legal department, one that has to use outside counsel more often.

Mansbach is the vice president, deputy general counsel and corporate secretary at Halyard Health Inc., a medical device company that spun off from Kimberly-Clark Corp. in 2014. Mansbach worked for Kimberly-Clark and went to Halyard with the spinoff.Asked about the key to managing outside counsel, he said, "The first part is just choosing the right counsel. You're going to be working with someone who's extremely capable and driven to help. Assuming you've hired the right counsel, the key is enabling them to do their best work."

Mansbach graduated from the University of Chicago law school, clerked for a federal judge in Chicago and moved to Atlanta to work at Powell Goldstein before going in-house.

Continue Reading: http://m.dailyreportonline.com/#/article/colu...

Categories: Alumni News

Marcy Jo Mandel, ‘81: Recipient of the Dana Latham Memorial Award

May 9, 2017 - 2:28pm

The Dana Latham Memorial Award is only given to leaders of the Los Angeles tax bar who have made outstanding contributions to the community and to the legal profession in the feild of taxation, including this year's recipient, Marcy Jo Mandel, '81.

Original source: 

https://www.lacba.org/connect/lacba-sections/...

In 1976, the Los Angeles County Bar Taxation Section decided to honor the memory of Dana Latham by establishing the Dana Latham Memorial Award. The first recipient of the award was Arthur B. Willis, an outstanding member of the Los Angeles tax bar.

The award is given only in those years when the Executive Committee of the Taxation Section concludes that there is a then-living leader of the Los Angeles tax bar who has made an outstanding contribution to the community and to the legal profession in the field of taxation. Generally, such service involves a broad participation in community and public service coupled with achievement as a leader on the Bench, in legal education, tax literature, or in practice as a lawyer, and may involve a combination of these factors.

Continue reading: https://www.lacba.org/connect/lacba-sections/taxation/taxation-section-home-page/dana-latham-memorial-award

Categories: Alumni News

David M. Rubenstein, '73: "David Rubenstein's Monopoly Money"

May 5, 2017 - 9:57am

The private equity founder and ultimate Washington insider built Carlyle Group into a $158 billion powerhouse. Can he achieve the same success with philanthropy?

Original source: 

http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/article/...

It would have been a mistake to assume I understood David Rubenstein’s approach to money from playing Monopoly with him. He built houses on every property he owned, regardless of the neighborhood. “I buy everything,” Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of private equity firm Carlyle Group, told me.

We were seated in an airy loft in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, shooting an interview as part of Institutional Investor’s “War Stories over Board Games” video series, in which financial titans recount the most memorable moments of their careers over a board or card game. Rubenstein may have seemed like he’d be a natural at the famous property-­trading game, but he failed to double-check how much money I doled out at the beginning of the game, and he never asked to get paid after passing Go.

Such indifference hardly would have powered Carlyle, which Rubenstein, 67, co-founded in 1987, to amass $158 billion in private equity, real estate, infrastructure, energy and credit investments. But observing Rubenstein’s gaming strategy did provide a few hints as to what’s behind his success. When I told him that as a kid I always questioned whether I should build houses on the cheap properties rather than Boardwalk, he quickly answered that I should buy something cheap and let it appreciate. He offered another lesson when he pulled a card from Community Chest and was dunned $40 for street repairs. “I don’t think that’s fair,” he said, adding that he would go straight to the tax assessor. “Always hire a good lawyer,” he quipped. Rubenstein was once one himself. After graduating from the University of Chicago Law School in 1973, he practiced law privately for two years before joining the government as chief counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee’s subcommittee on constitutional amendments. By 1977 he had worked his way up to the job of deputy assistant to president Jimmy Carter, but that stint ended when Ronald Reagan took office in 1981.

Rubenstein then joined a big law firm, but his heart and mind were elsewhere. Inspired by William Simon’s 1981 leveraged buyout of Gibson Greetings, which turned $1 million into $80 million in two and a half years, Rubenstein began thinking about how to start a different kind of private equity firm. He thought a Washington-based firm that invested in companies influenced by the federal government could be a good bet, particularly if it attracted people who knew how the state worked. His preoccupation with this idea was a sign, in his mind, that he wasn’t cut out for the law. “If you’re good at what you do, you don’t have time to think about something else,” he says.

Categories: Alumni News

The Honorable L. Howard Bennett, '50: Grandson of Slave, Broke Race Barriers in Minnesota, Minneapolis

May 2, 2017 - 10:40am

Minnesota's first black judge, L. Howard Bennett, '50, won a seat as the first black member elected to the Minneapolis school board in 1963.

Original source: 

http://www.startribune.com/judge-l-howard-ben...

It was a day both monumental and mundane.

The cases on the Minneapolis conciliation court docket included a furniture upholsterer accusing a client of insufficient pay. Another concerned mechanics’ work on a troublesome auto transmission. Then there was the pair of pants allegedly cleaned improperly at a city laundry.

First, though, Municipal Judge L. Howard Bennett had to contend with a finicky button on his black robe in Room 432 of Minneapolis City Hall.

“That top hole bothers me, too,” Judge Tom Bergin said, before swearing in Bennett as Minnesota’s first black judge on Jan. 6, 1958. “May you wear the robe with pride, dignity and honor.”

Continue reading: http://www.startribune.com/judge-l-howard-ben...

Categories: Alumni News

Kevin McAleenan, '98: "Trade Stakeholders Welcome Nomination as CBP Head"

April 28, 2017 - 2:08pm

Importers, customs brokers, and other trade stakeholders are praising President Trump's nomination earlier this month of Kevin K. McAleenan, '98, as Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Original source: 

http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20170428-trade-stakeholders-welcome-nomination-of-mcaleenan-as-cbp-head/

Importers, customs brokers, and other trade stakeholders are praising President Trump's nomination earlier this month of Kevin K. McAleenan as Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). McAleenan, who became acting commissioner when Trump took office in January, is the first in recent memory to come from within CBP's career ranks rather than from an outside law-enforcement agency. Industry observers expect an easy confirmation by the Senate.

International traders know McAleenan well. He previously served as deputy commissioner, CBP's most senior career position, comparable to a chief operating officer in private industry. He has also held such varied positions as acting assistant commissioner of CBP's Office of Field Operations and port director of Los Angeles International Airport. His lengthy career at CBP has included responsibilities in trade facilitation, border security, and antiterrorism operations.

Continue reading: http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20170428-trade-stakeholders-welcome-nomination-of-mcaleenan-as-cbp-head/

Categories: Alumni News

Jonathan Baum, '82: "Not That Kind of Lawyer"

April 28, 2017 - 2:05pm

A Q&A with Jonathan Baum, '82, Director of Pro Bono Services at Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP. 

Original source: 

http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=811a46f526453227512778957&id=a116ccb467

Q: Where did you grow up?
JB: I was born in Hyde Park. When I was nine years old we moved to Evanston, which is actually where I live now. I grew up in a civil rights family. My parents were very active; my father was a sociologist and my mother was a school teacher. One of the first things we did after we moved to Evanston in 1967, I remember, was marching around the Evanston civic center demonstrating for an open housing ordinance.

Q: How did you become a lawyer?
JB: After college, I went to work on Capitol Hill for Congressman Abner Mikva, who is a progressive legend and was my mentor. My uncle was a law professor at the time, and I met with him as I was thinking about going to law school. He knew how active I’d been in political causes, and he said, “Lawyers make very poor revolutionaries, because they never believe in anything with total conviction.” And so I’ve tried to be not that kind of lawyer.

Continue reading: http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=811a46f526453227512778957&id=a116ccb467

Categories: Alumni News

James Squires, '92: "Leading in Uncharted Territory"

April 28, 2017 - 1:56pm

Norfolk Southern’s James Squires,'92, is leading that company into uncharted territory.

Original source: 

http://pilotonline.com/james-squires-norfolk-southern-ceo-no-ib-power-list/article_70ec0067-7c27-5940-89d0-c0673cc6268c.html

Norfolk Southern’s James Squires is leading that company into uncharted territory.

Squires was named CEO in 2015. In his first eight months, the rail freight service company posted performance levels that were near an all-time high for the organization.

In a 2016 episode of CNBC’s Mad Money, Squires explained to host Jim Kramer that focusing on business process improvements and productivity were key. He asserted the railway’s modest carbon footprint and lower energy expenditure made Norfolk Southern an efficient form of transportation, even as compared to trucking.

Continue reading: http://pilotonline.com/james-squires-norfolk-southern-ceo-no-ib-power-list/article_70ec0067-7c27-5940-89d0-c0673cc6268c.html

Categories: Alumni News

Jamil Jaffer, '03: New Law Clerk for US Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch

April 25, 2017 - 12:08pm

When Jamil Jaffer, '03, testified in favor of U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch last month, he recalled the day in 2006 when he and Michael Davis started working for Gorsuch as law clerks at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Denver.

Original source: 

http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=12027844...

When Jamil Jaffer testified in favor of U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch last month, he recalled the day in 2006 when he and Michael Davis started working for Gorsuch as law clerks at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Denver.

“Judge Gorsuch took us alpine sledding,” Jaffer told the Senate Judiciary Committee. “Seriously. He beat us down the mountain twice and never let us forget that even with nearly a decade on us, he could beat two young whippersnappers like us.”

Eleven years later, those whippersnappers are clerking for Gorsuch again—this time in the warmer clime of Washington, D.C. Gorsuch hired them along with Janie Nitze and Matthew Owen for his short transitional period at the high court until the current term winds down this summer. Then another set of clerks—including Owen—will take over for the full 2017-2018 term.

Here are thumbnail sketches of each of the current clerks:

Continue reading: http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=12027844...

Categories: Alumni News

Kim Daniels, '94: Announced as St. Francis College Commencement Speaker 2017

April 24, 2017 - 9:57am

St. Francis's undergraduate ceremony will feature keynote speaker Kim Daniels, '94, a member of the Vatican’s Secretariat for Communications.

Original source: 

http://www.tribdem.com/news/area-colleges-ann...

Commencement will be held May 7 in the DeGol Arena of the Maurice Stokes Athletics Center. There will be two ceremonies – the graduate ceremony at 10 a.m (doors open at 9:45 a.m.) and the undergraduate at 2 p.m. (doors open at 12:30 p.m.).

A total of 778 students – 402 undergraduate and 376 graduate – will earn degrees. About 550 students are expected to participate in the two ceremonies.

The undergraduate ceremony will feature keynote speaker Kim Daniels, a member of the Vatican’s Secretariat for Communications.

Established in 2015, the Secretariat for Communications oversees all of the Vatican’s communications offices, including Vatican Radio, L’Osservatore Romano, the Vatican Television Center, the Holy See Press Office, the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, the Vatican Typography, the Photograph Service and the Vatican Publishing House.

Daniels was appointed by Pope Francis in July.

Continue reading: http://www.tribdem.com/news/area-colleges-ann...

Categories: Alumni News

Scott Baker, '00: Installed as Kirsch Professor

April 24, 2017 - 9:46am

Scott Baker, '00 has been installed as the inaugural William F. and Jessica L. Kirsch Professor at Washington University in St. Louis.

Original source: 

https://source.wustl.edu/2017/04/baker-instal...

Scott Baker has been installed as the inaugural William F. and Jessica L. Kirsch Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. A lecture and reception to mark the occasion were held Feb. 20 in the Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom and Crowder Courtyard in Anheuser-Busch Hall.

A prolific and widely respected law and economics scholar, Baker’s research interests lie at the intersection of law, economics and game theory. His expertise spans a wide range of topics from judicial performance to the structure of law firms to problems in patent law.

Baker’s endowed position is the first to be established through a planned gift from Mary Elizabeth Brenneisen, the late daughter of William F. and Jessica L. Kirsch, in honor of her parents. William Kirsch was a member of the Washington University School of Law’s Class of 1909, graduating first in his class and receiving the prestigious Order of the Coif. He went on to practice law for nearly 60 years with the Arkansas firm Goodman Moore PLLC.

Continue reading: https://source.wustl.edu/2017/04/baker-instal...

Categories: Alumni News

Jim Kaplan, '81: "Q&A: Chicago Law Professor Geoffrey Stone Talks about 'Sex and the Constitution'"

April 21, 2017 - 4:31pm

The National’s James Kaplan, '81, a long-time Chicago and New York lawyer and a former student of Professor Geoffrey Stone, talks with Professor Stone about his important new book "Sex and the Constitution."

Original source: 

http://www.thenationalbookreview.com/features...

There are two notable things about University of Chicago Law Professor Geoffrey R. Stone’s Sex and the Constitution:  Sex, Religion and Law from America’s Origins to the Twenty-First Century.  First, the book is too modestly titled.  It is not only about sex and the Constitution, but most major issues related to sex and the Constitution, including gender discrimination, abortion, same-sex issues, contraception and obscenity.

Second, it is an insightful history of the “social issues” that dominate 21st century American culture, politics and identity -- and a sophisticated and complex analysis of the Supreme Court’s treatment of them.  The book’s subtitle -- “Sex, Religion, and Law” -- is significant, because behind so much legal and cultural conflict lies a battle over religion and its use of the state to enforce its moral codes.  In a particularly trenchant passage, Stone sets out the basic conflict:

Battles over obscenity, contraception, abortion, sodomy, and same-sex marriage sharply divided Americans along religious lines.  Those holding certain religious beliefs about the sinfulness of such behavior, ranging from Lyman Beecher . . . to Jerry Falwell, vigorously insisted that such conduct must be forbidden as “immoral,” whereas those holding different . . . beliefs, ranging from Samuel Roth to Estelle Griswold . . . insisted with equal vigor that government cannot constitutionally restrict . . . freedom merely because some -- or even most -- people believe their conduct to be “sinful.”

As the power and pull of organized religion has waxed and waned in America, the success of claims for greater individual freedom and self-expression have followed the same pattern.  And although the last 50 years have, by and large, encouraged freedom and discouraged religious authoritarianism, Stone reminds us that the future is promised to neither side. 

With its incisive examination of the arguments -- and bedrock values -- of each side in this never-ending American cultural war, Sex and the Constitution goes to the heart of the subject more than any other recent exploration.  And it persuasively warns against believing that any easy resolution of the matter is in the offing.  The National’s James Kaplan talked with Professor Stone about his important new book.

Continue reading: http://www.thenationalbookreview.com/features...

Categories: Alumni News

James Butler, '85: Owner of Shaircraft Solutions Creates Enviable Niche Negotiating Private Aircraft Contracts

April 21, 2017 - 4:22pm

James Butler, '85 owns Shaircraft Solutions, which negotiates terms for travelers who want fractional ownership of a private jet.

Original source: 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/econo...

Speaking of air travel, there is an alternative to putting up with the pat downs, long lines, constant waits, cancellations and the passenger mistreatment you’ve been reading about recently.

But it will probably cost you thousands of dollars per hour.

We’re talking about fractional ownership in private jets.

James Butler is an attorney with a one-man shop in Bethesda called Shaircraft Solutions. Butler, 58, has created an enviable, 20-year niche negotiating contracts on behalf of the one-percenters who can afford to own a piece of a private aircraft. Think Flexjet, NetJets and others.

Butler’s dozens of clients include big-time financiers and sports-team owners; business executives; professional golfers such as Scott Hoch and Bob Tway; retirees; people with two homes; and just plain wealthy individuals who want to smooth out some of the rough edges in their lives.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/econo...

Categories: Alumni News

Neomi Rao, '99: Nominated to Run the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs

April 20, 2017 - 1:51pm

Neomi Rao, '99, a little-known law professor at George Mason University, could soon become one of the most powerful officials in Washington.

Original source: 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/econo...

Neomi Rao, a little-known law professor at George Mason University, could soon become one of the most powerful officials in Washington.

President Trump has nominated the conservative lawyer to run the obscure but powerful Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, a gateway through which federal regulations must pass.

The office, known as OIRA (pronounced oh-eye-rah), would make Rao the Trump administration’s regulatory czar, responsible for vetting and tallying cost estimates for most regulations. The office also resolves conflicts between agencies, and can either sink a rule or send it back for major rewrites.

Continue reading: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/econo...

Categories: Alumni News

Bob Barnett, '71: Washington Superlawyer is the "Doorman to the Revolving Door"

April 19, 2017 - 10:53am

Washington’s consummate insider, Bob Barnett, '71, finds himself on the outside looking in on Donald Trump’s Washington.

Original source: 

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/0...

The churn between presidential administrations is typically the sweet spot for Bob Barnett, the Washington superlawyer who likes to describe himself as the “doorman to the revolving door.” Outgoing White House officials, from the president on down, are ready to cash in with book deals, sign with speaker bureaus, become paid contributors on cable networks and negotiate potential corporate board and employment opportunities. And Barnett—famous for charging his $1,250 hourly rate, rather than the 10 to 15 percent commission that literary and talent agents typically take off the top—has been Washington, D.C.’s go-to deal-maker for this kind of work for four decades.

Bill Clinton and Barack Obama are longtime clients, as are many of their bold-faced-named former advisers, like James Carville and David Axelrod. So is George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Sarah Palin and Karl Rove. Barnett’s been at the political celebrity game for decades, since he sold Geraldine Ferraro’s book, in 1984, for $1 million. He’s so competitive that his law firm, Williams & Connolly, waived the retirement age so Barnett, 70, could keep on chugging.

And on the face of it, it doesn’t look like much has changed in the intervening decades for Barnett, a wise man of the Washington establishment—always dressed in a suit and sporting his signature antique cuff links—except for the dollar amount of his deals exponentially ticking up. Barnett, now a local legend, appears to be at the top of his negotiating game even as the establishment he is a part of is being overturned by another master deal-maker, President Donald Trump.

Continue reading: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/0...

Categories: Alumni News

Steve Marenberg, '80: Recognized in Variety's 2017 Legal Impact Report

April 13, 2017 - 10:51am

As Hollywood's talent and executive pool is stretched by booming TV production, Marenberg, '80 detects growing disputes over Hollywood customs on employment law. 

Original source: 

http://variety.com/gallery/legal-impact-report-2017/#!25/steve-marenberg/

As Hollywood’s talent and executive pool is stretched by booming TV production, Marenberg, '80, detects growing disputes over Hollywood customs on employment law.

Multi-year contracts that are the norm and circumstances in which courts can issue injunctions are being challenged. Tech companies on the prowl in Hollywood bring the Silicon Valley culture of at-will employment so “there’s a divide between tech and Hollywood,” he says. 

Continue reading here

Categories: Alumni News

Andrew Finch, '97: Paul Weiss Attorney To Run DOJ Antitrust

April 11, 2017 - 12:08pm

Andrew Finch, '97, a veteran of the division from the George W. Bush administration, will become acting assistant attorney general starting April 10, taking over for Brent Snyder, the career staff division deputy in charge of criminal antitrust enforcement.

Original source: 

https://www.law360.com/articles/910192/paul-w...

The U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday that a Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP partner would lead the Antitrust Division temporarily while White House deputy counsel Makan Delrahim awaits confirmation.

Andrew Finch, '97, a veteran of the division from the George W. Bush administration, will become acting assistant attorney general starting April 10, taking over for Brent Snyder, the career staff division deputy in charge of criminal antitrust enforcement. Finch will become Delrahim's principal deputy at the division once the Senate confirms his nomination, according to a DOJ spokesman.

"It's terrific for the administration and for Andrew," said Rick Rule, who heads the firm's antitrust practice and led the division in the late '80s. "When my team and I came here [in August], one of the things that appealed to us was the group of antitrust lawyers the firm already had, and Andrew is prominent among them."

Continue reading here

Categories: Alumni News

Dr. Kameron Matthews, '06: Named a 2017 40 Under 40 Leader in Minority Health

April 6, 2017 - 10:56am

The National Minority Quality Forum is proud to announce the selection of the 2017 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health, including Dr. Kameron Matthews, '06.

Original source: 

http://www.nmqf.org/2017-40-under-40-leaders-...

The National Minority Quality Forum is proud to announce the selection of the 2017 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health. After receiving hundreds of applications from healthcare professionals across the country, these 40 represent the next generation of thought leaders in reducing health disparities.

“Here at the NMQF, we are truly excited about this next class of honorees and recognizing them at our annual leadership summit,” stated NMQF President & CEO Dr. Gary Puckrein.  “The 2017 winners are doing amazing things that both better and diversify the healthcare marketplace.  They serve as positive role models for our next generation of leaders in minority health."

Continue reading here

Categories: Alumni News