Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • How to Avoid a Regulatory Nightmare: Compliance and Regulatory Strategies for the Post Crisis World

    LAWS 94814 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    Since the financial crisis of 2008, regulators and prosecutors around the world increasingly expect companies to have state of the art governance, risk and compliance programs as a condition for remaining in business and for avoiding liabilities for regulatory missteps. Increasingly, regulatory rules are becoming more complex and authorities are becoming more unforgiving, with stepped up efforts to secure criminal and civil penalties against companies, their executives, lawyers and auditors. For companies, such liability can at best result in plummeting share prices, and at worst the shutting down of an enterprise. For individuals, they can result in incarceration, fines, penalties and removal from the business. While many of the principles apply to all industries, the seminar will explore the regulatory and legal foundations for these programs primarily through the lens of the financial services sector, which includes banks, brokerage firms, investment companies and investment advisers. We will also explore how the design and execution of these programs can avoid or limit potential liabilities from regulatory and criminal authorities. From the perspective of a corporate executive or counsel, students will develop the ability to understand the fundamentals of regulatory regimes overseeing these businesses, as well as strategies for successfully engaging the regulators. Students will consider the steps a firm should take to mitigate regulatory and reputation risk, including the importance of an effective corporate ethics program, as well as how, in the process, a firm can enhance its brand, meet the expectations of its board of directors and create value for its shareholders. The grade is based on a final take-home exam, a short research paper and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Charles Senatore
  • Human Rights and the Responsibility to Protect

    LAWS 96204 - 01 (2) m, x
    Despite its very recent development, the doctrine of ‘Responsibility to Protect’ (RtP) is now a prominent normative framework in global governance. One of the most significant driving factors in its emergence has been despair about the international community’s failure to intervene in the Rwandan Genocide in 1994 and in the Srebenica Massacre in 1995. RtP doctrine rejects a Westphalian conception of state sovereignty, and is instead predicated upon the view that the sovereignty of state governments is conditional upon them neither perpetrating, nor allowing the perpetration of, certain kinds of egregious human rights abuses within their borders. In this seminar we will begin by surveying the recent history of RtP as a guiding normative framework in international law and politics, and considering some of the challenges that have arisen around the implementation of RtP. We will then investigate three sets of questions related to RtP – and though our questions will be theoretical, we will be aiming to respond to them in a way that is informed by empirical considerations. First, what should we make of the provocative claim that RtP mobilizes a set of parochially Western values, or that it is a pretext for powerful states to enact a neo-Colonialist agenda in Africa and the Middle East? Second, if we have rejected the first criticism, are there nevertheless in-principle reasons to doubt the effectiveness of RtP as a means of decreasing egregious humanitarian abuses in the long term? Third, does the emergence of RtP as a norm in global governance shed any light on the debate in Human Rights Theory, between those who think we must understand human rights primarily as institutional artefacts (i.e. proponents of the Political conception of Human rights), and those who think we can properly regard human rights as a species of natural rights (i.e. proponents of the Orthodox conception of Human Rights)? The grade is based on a final research paper (90%) and class participation (10%).
    Winter 2015
    Robert Simpson
  • Immigration Law

    LAWS 50001 - 01 (3)
    This course explores the U.S. immigration system. The course will focus on the federal laws and policies that regulate the admission and exclusion of immigrants. Topics covered will include: the visa system, deportation and removal, the law of asylum, the role of the states in regulating migrants, and proposed reforms to the immigration system. The course will also consider how immigration law connects to both constitutional law and foreign policy. The grade is based on a final in-class examination.
    Autumn 2014
    Adam Chilton
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Autumn 2014
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Winter 2015
  • Independent Research

    LAWS 49901 - 01 (1 to 3) +, r, w
    Second-year, third-year, and LL.M. students may earn course credit by independent research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Such projects are arranged by consultation between the student and the particular member of the faculty in whose field the proposed topic falls.
    Spring 2015
  • Innovative Solutions for Business, Law, and Social Issues

    LAWS 91304 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Many business, legal, and social problems cry out for the kind of imagination typically found in the fields of art, design, and invention. Yet, very few of us take time to cultivate the analytic and creative skills that give rise to truly innovative solutions. In this seminar, we will apply “design thinking,” originally developed by the founders of IDEO (the design firm behind Steve Jobs and Apple), and a variety of related techniques, to important business, legal, and social problems. We will look at how successful innovators obtain breakthroughs, and we will then practice the techniques on simple challenges such as inventing a new product before we progress to larger, more complex challenges like designing an organization that continuously invents streams of new products. In law, we will look at why corporate clients hold creative lawyers in the highest regard, and as an exercise in design thinking, we will design a system that enables compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in a company striving for growth in risky, emerging markets. We will also look at legal education and determine how design thinking can lead to more imaginative and meaningful reform. In the area of social impact, we will look at how we as a society can enable universal access to potable water, and we will also consider new approaches to building sustainable, green cities amidst the new surge in urbanization taking place in India, China, and the developing world. Grading will be determined by class participation and by performance across three papers. The first paper will examine best practices in innovation. The second paper will focus on a specific case in business or the legal profession. The third paper will address a large-scale problem such as climate change, political polarization, or North Korea – and require students to work in teams and present their work to the class at the conclusion of the seminar.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Manning
  • Insider Trading

    LAWS 65803 - 01 (2) +, m, x
    Insider trading remains a controversial area of the law, characterized by strong opinions about the desirability of regulating insider trading and a proliferation of theories for such regulation. This seminar will concentrate on the leading law review articles staking out positions on insider trading, with a focus on the policy reasons advanced by each side. The first week we will review the leading insider trading cases. For each of the following seminar sessions, the class will read and discuss assigned law review or economics journal articles. For each seminar session, a few students will be assigned to write 6-8 page critiques of the assigned articles in advance of the class meeting and then to lead the discussion of those articles. Over the course of the seminar, each student will write three critiques. All students not writing a critique on any particular article will be required to submit six written questions about that article in advance of each seminar session and to participate in the discussion for each class. Grades will be based 60% on the written critiques and questions and 40% on seminar participation. There will be no final exam or seminar paper. Prerequisite: Business Associations I/Business Organizations (may be taken concurrently).
    Spring 2015
    Douglas Levene
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Autumn 2014
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Winter 2015
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Spring 2015
    Elizabeth Kregor, Salen Churi
  • Insurance Law

    LAWS 43601 - 01 (3)
    An exploration of risk spreading through common law and administrative regulation of insurance products. The primary emphasis of the course is liability insurance (including commercial, automobile, professional, and product liability), although the class also tackles other, more exotic forms of insurance (including reinsurance). The goal of the course is to alert students to how insurance institutions in the United States and abroad affect economic behavior, and in particular how they affect litigation and lawyers. Grades will be based on a final examination.
    Spring 2015
    Omri Ben-Shahar
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class. The grade is based on a final written paper and will be adjusted to reflect class participation.
    Autumn 2014
    Michael Friedman
  • Intensive Trial Practice Workshop

    LAWS 67503 - 01 (3) +, s, u
    This practicum teaches trial preparation, trial advocacy, and strategy through a variety of teaching techniques, including lectures and demonstrations, but primarily through simulated trial exercises. Topics include opening statements, witness preparation, direct and cross examination, expert witnesses, objections at trial, and closing argument. Practicing lawyers and judges are enlisted to provide students with lectures and critiques from varied perspectives. The practicum concludes with a simulated jury trial presided over by sitting state and federal court judges. Open to J.D. students only. Completion of this workshop partially satisfies one of the requirements for admission to the trial bar of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. This practicum is open only to students entering their 3L year and limited to 48 with preference given to students who have been accepted into a Litigation Clinic course. Students who have taken Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603), Poverty and Housing Law Clinic (LAWS 90512), or Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy (LAWS 91702) may not take this class. This practicum is offered for approximately six hours/day during the two weeks prior to the beginning of the Autumn quarter. The 2014 Workshop is scheduled from 9/15 through 9/26, and the final trial is scheduled for Saturday, September 27. The student's grade is based on a compilation of daily performance evaluations.
    Autumn 2014
    Herschella G. Conyers, Craig B. Futterman, Mark J. Heyrman, Randall D. Schmidt, Randolph N. Stone
  • Interdisciplinary Approaches to Criminal Justice

    LAWS 60804 - 01 (2) m, x
    We will read literature from fields including economics, criminology, sociology, history, and psychology in an attempt to make sense of various features of the American criminal justice system. These include the determinants of crime; the effects of policing, incarceration, and social programs on crime rates; and the consequences of criminal punishment. We will discuss how the approaches of these disciplines differ and what each has to offer. The grade is based on a series of reaction papers.
    Spring 2015
    John Rappaport
  • International Arbitration

    LAWS 94602 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    This seminar gives students a practical foundation in the mechanics of international commercial arbitration and an understanding of the tactical choices that frequently confront international arbitration practitioners. With the emergence of the global economy and the explosive growth of cross-border transactions and multinational joint ventures, international arbitration has become the leading mechanism for resolution of international commercial disputes. With parties increasingly unwilling to accept the risks of litigation in the local courts of their foreign business partners, international arbitration agreements are now a mainstay of cross-border commercial transactions. Topics include the crafting of effective international arbitration agreements, the relative advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc UNCITRAL-style arbitration and institutional arbitration (ICC, AAA, etc.), the rules of procedure that govern international arbitration, the difficult procedural issues that commonly arise in international arbitration (such as the availability and extent of discovery, the consolidation of parties and claims, etc.), procedural and substantive issues applicable to investor-state arbitration, the effective presentation of evidence, and the enforcement of international arbitral awards. The student's grade is based upon the quality of preparation for and oral participation in the seminar, as well as the quality of a required research paper.
    Spring 2015
    Alan D'Ambrosio
  • International Environmental Law

    LAWS 92702 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    This seminar examines how global resources can be protected within an international legal framework where state actors reign supreme. Sources of international environmental law and associated enforcement mechanisms will be discussed with reference to various environmental problems such as loss of biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, trans-boundary air pollution, and oil spills. The relationship between trade, development, and environmental protection will receive particular attention throughout the seminar, as will issues arising from the evolving role of non-state actors. The student's grade will be based on class participation and a major paper. This seminar may be taken to fulfill one of the substantial writing requirements if the major paper is certified by the professor as having met the criteria.
    Spring 2015
    Georgie Boge Geraghty
  • International Finance</