Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Greenberg Seminar: Native Americans

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    In this Greenberg Seminar, professors Todd Henderson (Law) and Justin Richland (Anthropology) will lead discussions of works of fiction and non-fiction regarding Native Americans. Professor Henderson lived briefly on the Navajo/Hopi Reservation and recently taught a seminar on American Indian Law. Professor Richland specializes in Native American law and politics. He has served as a justice on the Hopi Appellate Court and is the founder of a non-profit designed to bring social justice services to native peoples. The historical plight of Native Americans is well known, but often misunderstood; the current situation is not as well known, and equally misunderstood where it is. The aim of this Greenberg is to put the history in perspective, and to illuminate the current situation of the nearly 500 semi-autonomous tribes of American Indians that exist today. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    M. Todd Henderson
  • Greenberg Seminar: Native Americans

    LAWS 95902 - 02 a
    In this Greenberg Seminar, professors Todd Henderson (Law) and Justin Richland (Anthropology) will lead discussions of works of fiction and non-fiction regarding Native Americans. Professor Henderson lived briefly on the Navajo/Hopi Reservation and recently taught a seminar on American Indian Law. Professor Richland specializes in Native American law and politics. He has served as a justice on the Hopi Appellate Court and is the founder of a non-profit designed to bring social justice services to native peoples. The historical plight of Native Americans is well known, but often misunderstood; the current situation is not as well known, and equally misunderstood where it is. The aim of this Greenberg is to put the history in perspective, and to illuminate the current situation of the nearly 500 semi-autonomous tribes of American Indians that exist today. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    M. Todd Henderson, Justin Richland
  • Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad

    LAWS 95902 - 05 (1) a, x
    The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Michael Albertus
  • Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Michael Albertus
  • Greenberg Seminar: Redistribution in America and Abroad

    LAWS 95902 - 05 a
    The redistribution of resources is perhaps the most important -- and controversial -- task of government. In this seminar, we will consider redistribution both in America and abroad. The following are some of the issues we will examine: What circumstances prompt governments around the world to engage in redistribution? Is redistribution an effective or feasible response to rising inequality? What are the economic costs and benefits of redistribution? How do the affluent prevent greater redistribution in democracies given their relatively small numbers? The materials we will cover include works by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Lawrence Lessig, and Thomas Piketty. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Michael Albertus
  • Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary

    LAWS 95902 - 07 (1) a, x
    There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
  • Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary

    LAWS 95902 - 07 a
    There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
  • Greenberg Seminar: Villains: Real and Imaginary

    LAWS 95902 - 07 a
    There can be no heroes without villains, whether in literature, popular media, or the law. This seminar explores real and imaginary villains: how such villains are created, who creates them, and how these so-called villains experience their vilification. In particular, we consider villains in the corporate and government contexts — the evil CEO, the corrupt politician, the unscrupulous lobbyist — and how they are portrayed (or mis-portrayed) in films, newspapers, and novels. We will meet on Wednesday evenings throughout the year. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Anthony Casey, Jennifer Nou
  • Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law

    LAWS 95902 - 06 (1) a, x
    This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Autumn 2014
    Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law

    LAWS 95902 - 06 a
    This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Winter 2015
    Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
  • Greenberg Seminar: Wine and the Law

    LAWS 95902 - 06 a
    This seminar will consider the law and politics of wine production and regulation in the US and elsewhere. There will be an empirical research component. Graded Pass/Fail.
    Spring 2015
    Tom Ginsburg, Jonathan Masur
  • Health Law and Policy

    LAWS 78801 - 01 (3) c/l, w
    This course will explore various policies that underlie regulation of the provision of health care in the United States. We will begin with an examination of the principal government programs for financing the delivery of health care in America -- Medicare and Medicaid. This first third of the course will focus on how these programs seek to resolve the tension between controlling costs, promoting quality, and assuring access. We will next address other federal legislation affecting the delivery of health care, including the Affordable Care Act. We will then move to a consideration of policy issues relating to managed care organizations, including the functioning of these organizations and the impact of ERISA on their actions. Next, we will explore issues relating to the behavior of physicians, hospitals, and nursing homes. This exploration will focus on the impact of the antitrust, labor, and tax laws on these entities. The goal of the course is to expose the student to the conflicting law and policy issues that impact on the delivery of health in this country. The grade will be based on a final written paper or an in-class examination – depending on how many students enroll. (11/10/14 update: There will be not be an exam as too few students elected that option.) Class participation will also be taken into account.
    Autumn 2014
    Jack Bierig
  • Higher Education and the Law

    LAWS 52102 - 01 (3) m, w, x
    The university has long maintained that its history and role as a creator of knowledge and refuge for society's critics require that the government and the courts extend a special respect to the academy's need to govern itself. This seminar discusses how the courts have dealt with this argument in areas such as academic freedom; student admissions and discipline; faculty tenure, dismissal, and unionization; and teaching and research restrictions. Discussions focus on the competing interests of society and the university and the role of the courts in balancing these interests. The student's grade is based on class participation and a major or substantial paper.
    Spring 2015
    Arthur Sussman
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judge the semi-final arguments and select the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Autumn 2014
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Winter 2015
  • Hinton Moot Court Competition

    LAWS 99911 - 01 (0 to 3) +, a, w
    The Hinton Moot Court Competition is open to all second- and third-year students (except those third-year students who made it to the semi-finals during the previous year). The competition provides students the opportunity to develop skills in writing and appellate advocacy. Moot Court participants advance through three rounds. The Fall Round: The focus of the preliminary round is on oral argument—no brief writing is required at this stage. After studying the briefs and record of an actual case and participating in practice arguments with student judges, each competitor must argue both sides of the case to panels of local alumni attorneys. Approximately 12-14 students advance to the semi-final (Winter) round. The Winter Round: The students who have advanced to the semi-final round must brief and argue a new case during the Winter quarter. A panel of faculty members judges the semi-final arguments and selects the four best advocates on the basis of their written and oral advocacy skills. Semifinalists are recognized as winners of the Mulroy Prize for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. The Spring Round: The four finalists work in teams of two on another new case during the Spring quarter. A panel of distinguished judges, usually federal appellate judges, presides at the final argument before the Law School community. The winning team is awarded the Hinton Cup; the runners-up are awarded the Llewellyn Cup. Students participating in the semifinal round may be eligible for three pass/fail credits and may satisfy the WP graduation requirement. Please see the Student Handbook for additional details.
    Spring 2015
  • History of Civil Liberties in the United States

    LAWS 70707 - 01 (3) c/l, m, r, w, x
    This seminar examines changing understandings of civil liberties in American legal history. It emphasizes legal and ideological contests over the meaning of free speech, religious freedom, and reproductive rights during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings explore the intersection between legal struggles and broader developments in social, cultural, and political history, with a particular focus on the labor, civil rights, and feminist movements. The grade is based on a final written paper and class participation.
    Spring 2015
    Laura Weinrib
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Autumn 2014
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The Housing Initiative is a transactional clinic in which students provide legal representation to community-based housing developers, tenant groups, and other parties involved in affordable housing development. Students serve as deal lawyers, advising clients on structuring issues; negotiating, drafting and reviewing construction loan documents, construction contracts, purchase and sale agreements, partnership agreements, and other contracts; securing zoning and other governmental approvals; assisting clients in resolving compliance issues under the applicable state and federal housing programs; and participating in the preparation of evidentiary and closing documents. Some of our work also involves community organizing and legislative and policy advocacy around affordable housing and public housing issues. In addition to working on specific transactions and projects, students in the Housing Initiative Clinic meet as a group in a weekly seminar in Autumn quarter, and periodically during Winter and Spring quarters, to discuss the substantive rules and legal skills pertinent to housing transactions and to examine emergent issues arising out of the students' work. During the Autumn quarter seminar, returning clinic students need only attend the first hour; new students should attend for the full two hours. Academic credit for the Housing Initiative Clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Winter 2015
    Jeff Leslie
  • Housing Initiative Clinic

    LAWS 95013 - 01 (1 to 3)