Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Law and Literature

    LAWS 99302 - 01 (2) m, x
    In the profession of Law, words and stories are critical. It is no coincidence that much of our greatest literature has issues of law as its main theme. Both law and literature use the literary imagination to construct a persuasive and engaging dramatic narrative. The similarities found in legal and literary uses of narrative and the frequency of legal themes in fiction provide the skilled reader many opportunities to better understand both law and literature through a study of their intersection. In this seminar, we will use the connections between law and literature to examine the development of law and the role of narrative in the practice of law. Through readings and discussion of great literature, we will critically analyze legal themes from their pre-law beginnings as wild justice through the development of law as an institution. We will apply the critical reading skills that are so essential in the interpretation of constitutions, statutes, rules, judicial opinions and documents to the understanding of literary texts, for which they are equally essential. To provide us with imaginative illustrations of legal issues, we will read selections ranging from Beowulf, Plato, Sophocles, Shakespeare and Milton, to works by Kafka, Tolstoy and Melville.
    Winter 2014
    Randy Berlin
  • Law and Religion

    LAWS 97522 - 01 (3) r
    This course will cover the constitutional law of religion as well as related statutes, such as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and antidiscrimination laws. Topics will include free exercise accommodations, religious expression in public spaces, the relationship between religion and the state, and the significance of religious institutions. Grades will be based on a final in-class examination or a full-length research paper, plus class participation.
    Winter 2014
    Eduardo Peñalver
  • Law and the Mental Health System

    LAWS 47001 - 01 (3) r, w
    The course examines the interrelationship between legal doctrine; procedural rules; medical, cultural, and social scientific understandings of mental disability; and institutional arrangements affecting the provision of services to the mentally disabled. Consideration is given to admission to and discharge from mental health facilities, to competency to consent to or to refuse treatment, to surrogate decision-making for those found incompetent, to the rights of those confined in mental health facilities; to discrimination against the mentally disabled, and to the rights of the mentally disabled in the criminal justice system. Grades are based on a final paper or a final take-home exam, and class participation.
    Autumn 2013
    Mark J. Heyrman
  • Leadership

    LAWS 75102 - 01 (2 to 3) +, m, r, s, w
    The divide between law and business is becoming increasingly blurred as clients look to their lawyers not merely for legal advice but also for leadership and results-focused solutions to complex business problems. Increasing competition, early specialization, and client cost constraints provide junior attorneys with few opportunities to develop the skills necessary to meet these increasing expectations. Through this highly intensive seminar, students will develop the judgment and practical skills necessary to become effective leaders and problem solvers, as well as an understanding of the theoretical foundations of effective leadership. Topics will include project management, strategic vision, forms of influence, and business leadership. Materials will include cutting-edge research, case histories, videos, and literature. Class sessions occasionally will include speakers who have played important leadership roles. The student's grade will be based on active and insightful class participation, reflection papers on assigned readings, and a final paper on an instructor-approved topic of the student's choosing (examples of potential topics include leadership in alliance formation, variations in governing board structures, performance consequences of executive succession, and leadership in outsourcing relationships). The seminar will require substantial out of class work and class participation will count toward the grade. Students will be developing leadership presentations and completing major projects outside of class. Enrollment is very limited given the unique nature of this seminar, and instructor approval is required. If there is sufficient student interest, there may be a follow-on leadership seminar offered in the Spring. A 2-credit option is available with permission of instructor.
    Winter 2014
    David Zarfes
  • Leading, Following, and Parting Ways

    LAWS 75104 - 01 (3) m, x
    How does one become a leader? Are leaders born or are they made? Do all leaders employ the same leadership style? What is the proper relationship between leaders and those they lead? This seminar will answer these questions by helping students to think critically about what makes for successful leadership and self-aware followership. Lessons and examples are drawn from history, literature, philosophy, politics, business, and law. The seminar is broken into two parts. In the first part, we will examine the moral psychology of leadership by reading works from Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin, William Shakespeare, and Thorstein Veblen, among others. In the second part, we will examine the perils and possibilities for those who are members, but not heads, of a common enterprise. The authors we will discuss include Frederick Winslow Taylor, Karl Marx, George Orwell, and Michael Lewis.
    Spring 2014
    John Paul Rollert
  • Legal Elements of Accounting

    LAWS 79102 - 01 (1) s, x
    This mini-course introduces accounting from a mixed law and business perspective. It covers basic concepts and vocabulary of accounting, not so much to instill proficiency with the mechanics of debits and credits as to serve as a foundation from which to understand financial statements. The course then examines accounting from a legal perspective, including consideration of common accounting decisions with potential legal ramifications. It also analyzes throughout the reasons for and roles of financial accounting and auditing, as well as the incentives of various persons involved in producing, regulating, and consuming financial accounting information. The course will touch on some limitations of, and divergent results possible under, generally accepted accounting principles. Current cases, proposals, and controversies will be discussed. Attendance and participation will be very important. Grades will be based on a take-home final examination. Students with substantial prior exposure to accounting (such as students with an MBA, joint MBA/JD, and undergraduate finance or accounting majors) may not take the course for credit. Class will meet for nine sessions, five days during week 1 (M-F Jan 6-10, 2014) and four days during week 3 (T-F Jan 21-24, 2014), and completion earns one credit.
    Winter 2014
    John Sylla
  • Legal Issues in International Transactions

    LAWS 42504 - 01 (3)
    This course explores the complex legal and political issues common in international transactions. It provides a brief introduction to a range of potential challenges for corporations engaging in international transactions including choice of law issues, extraterritorial regulation, international arbitration and investment rules, enforcement of arbitral awards, and compliance with the Alien Tort Statute and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, among other areas. Grades will be determined through a final examination.
    Winter 2014
    Daniel Abebe
  • Legal Profession

    LAWS 41002 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, will consider the law and the ethics governing lawyers. Among the topics that will be examined are the nature of the lawyer-client relationship, competency, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and some fundamental questions about who we are and what we stand for as lawyers. A student's grade is based on a final examination. This class will be capped at 50.
    Autumn 2013
    Barry Alberts
  • Legal Profession

    LAWS 41002 - 01 (3) p, x
    This course, which satisfies the professional responsibility requirement, will consider the law and the ethics governing lawyers. Among the topics that will be examined are the nature of the lawyer-client relationship, competency, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and some fundamental questions about who we are and what we stand for as lawyers. A student's grade is based on a final examination. This class will be capped at 50.
    Spring 2014
    Barry Alberts
  • Legal Profession: Ethics

    LAWS 41002 - 01 (3) m, p, w, x
    This seminar addresses ethical considerations raised during the practice of law, including strategic, practical, and moral considerations with which attorneys should be familiar. Using materials from a leading casebook, the rules, and cases or articles of particular interest, we will discuss both the rules and the ethical situations that lawyers face in a variety of situations. There will be a particular focus on the ambiguities of how to handle particularly difficult issues encountered in the practice of law and the rules and framework to which attorneys can turn in determining how to handle those issues. This seminar will be taught as a participatory class. Students will be evaluated both on the quality of their participation, and on the basis of a paper of 20 pages in length on a topic relating to professional responsibility chosen by and of particular interest to the student. Attendance is mandatory.
    Winter 2014
    Adam Hoeflich
  • Legal Profession: Ethics

    LAWS 41002 - 02 (3) m, p, w, x
    This seminar addresses ethical considerations raised during the practice of law, including strategic, practical, and moral considerations with which attorneys should be familiar. Using materials from a leading casebook, the rules, and cases or articles of particular interest, we will discuss both the rules and the ethical situations that lawyers face in a variety of situations. There will be a particular focus on the ambiguities of how to handle particularly difficult issues encountered in the practice of law and the rules and framework to which attorneys can turn in determining how to handle those issues. This seminar will be taught as a participatory class. Students will be evaluated both on the quality of their participation, and on the basis of a paper of 20 pages in length on a topic relating to professional responsibility chosen by and of particular interest to the student. Attendance is mandatory.
    Autumn 2013
    Adam Hoeflich
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 01 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    Genevieve Lakier
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 01 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2013
    Genevieve Lakier
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 01 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2014
    Genevieve Lakier
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 02 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    Vincent Buccola
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 02 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Winter 2014
    Vincent Buccola
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 02 (2) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Autumn 2013
    Vincent Buccola
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 03 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools and techniques of legal research and to write a series of memoranda and other documents representative of the lawyer's regular tasks. A prize, the Joseph Henry Beale Prize, is awarded for the outstanding written work in each legal writing section. The Bigelow Fellows also serve as tutor-advisors on an informal basis.
    Spring 2014
    Adam Chilton
  • Legal Research and Writing

    LAWS 30711 - 03 (1) 1L, a
    All first-year students participate in the legal research and writing program under the supervision of one of the six Bigelow Teaching Fellow and Lecturer in Laws. The work requires the student to become familiar with the standard tools