Offerings

Key:
+ subject to prerequisites, co-requisites, exclusions, or professor permission
1L first year required course
a extends over more than one quarter
c/l cross listed
e first-year elective
l Lecturer-taught seminar/simulation class
m seminar
p meets the professional responsibility/ethics requirement
r papers may meet substantial research paper (SRP) graduation requirement
s meets the professional skills requirement
u simulation class
w may meet writing project (WP) graduation requirement
x offering available for bidding
(#) the number of Law School credit hours earned for successful completion
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Winter 2016
    Elizabeth Kregor, Amy M. Hermalik
  • Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship

    LAWS 67613 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship, or IJ Clinic, provides legal assistance to low-income entrepreneurs who are pursuing the American Dream in spite of legal obstacles. IJ Clinic students develop practical skills in transactional lawyering while helping creative entrepreneurs earn an honest living, innovate, and build businesses that build neighborhoods. Students advise clients on issues such as business formation, licensing, zoning, strategic relationships, intellectual property protection, and regulatory compliance. Students become trusted advisors for their clients and have the opportunity to consult with clients on business developments; draft and review custom contracts; negotiate deals; research complex regulatory schemes and advise clients on how to comply; and occasionally appear before administrative bodies. Students may also work on policy projects to change laws that restrict low-income entrepreneurs. Policy work may involve legislative drafting, lobbying, and community organizing. Academic credit varies and will be awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical staff. The seminar Entrepreneurship & The Law is a pre- or co-requisite unless a student has received special permission from the IJ Clinic instructors. A commitment of at least two quarters is required.
    Spring 2016
    Elizabeth Kregor, Amy M. Hermalik
  • Intellectual Property-based Finance and Investment

    LAWS 95113 - 01 (3) l, m, w, x
    Developed economies once resembled a stable three-legged stool -- manufacturing, services and invention. Today, only Intellectual Property (“IP”) and the value it generates remains to support the standard of wealth developed nations have come to enjoy. IP now dwarfs all assets in value-at-risk with intangible assets accounting for over 75 percent of a company’s market capitalization. The seminar will focus on two general topic areas related to IP. First, the class will examine the multiple markets for IP which exist. Second, the class will focus on IP-based asset management and investment banking practices in an attempt to illustrate how economic value can be extracted from IP as an asset class. The grade is based on a final written paper and will be adjusted to reflect class participation.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael Friedman
  • Intensive Trial Practice Workshop

    LAWS 67503 - 01 (3) +, s, u
    This is a required class for participation in the Criminal Juvenile Justice, Exoneration and Police Accountability clinics, and strongly recommended for participation in the Employment Discrimination and Federal Criminal Justice clinics. This class teaches trial preparation, trial advocacy, and strategy through a variety of teaching techniques, including lectures and demonstrations, but primarily through simulated trial exercises. Topics include opening statements, witness preparation, direct and cross examination, expert witnesses, objections at trial, and closing argument. Practicing lawyers and judges are enlisted to provide students with lectures and critiques from varied perspectives. The class concludes with a simulated jury trial presided over by sitting state and federal court judges. This class is open only to J.D. students entering their 3L year and limited to 48, with preference given to students who have been accepted into a Litigation Clinic. Completion of this class partially satisfies one of the requirements for admission to the trial bar of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Students who have taken Trial Advocacy (LAWS 67603), Poverty and Housing Law Clinic (LAWS 90512), or Trial Practice: Strategy and Advocacy (LAWS 91702) may not take this class. This class is offered for approximately six hours/day before the beginning of the Autumn Quarter. The Autumn 2015 Workshop is scheduled from 9/14 through 9/25, and the final trial is scheduled for Saturday, September 26. The student's grade is based on a compilation of daily performance evaluations. The credits count towards the Autumn 2015 total number of credits cap. The class does not count towards the 2015-2016 Seminars/Simulations classes cap.
    Autumn 2015
    Herschella G. Conyers, Craig B. Futterman, Randolph N. Stone
  • International Commercial Arbitration

    LAWS 94602 - 01 (2) l, m, s, x
    The objective of this seminar is to familiarize the student with what has emerged as the primary means of resolving cross-border and multi-jurisdictional commercial disputes in today's global economy. Through this seminar, the student will explore the similarities and differences between international arbitration and the procedures used in common law (i.e. the U.S. and U.K.) and civil law (i.e. most of Europe, Asia and Latin America) systems. The student will develop an appreciation for the cross-cultural nature of international transactions and disputes and attain a certain facility with key international arbitration rules, multi-lateral treaties, and arbitration provisions. Through review of relevant court decisions, the student will develop an appreciation for the interplay between the arbitral authority and the national courts. Students will learn when and why to enter into arbitration agreements as well as how to initiate proceedings and select arbitrators, present evidence and contest and enforce awards. This seminar will be interactive with some experiential work, including negotiating, drafting, and oral advocacy in addition to class discussion. Booth students do not require instructor consent in order to submit a registration request. The student's grade will be based upon in-class participation and a take-home final exam. This course is highly recommended for students interested in negotiating international transactions and resolving the disputes arising thereunder.
    Autumn 2015
    Michael L. Morkin
  • International Environmental Law

    LAWS 92702 - 01 (3) c/l, l, m, w, x
    This seminar examines how global resources can be protected within an international legal framework where state actors reign supreme. Sources of international environmental law and associated enforcement mechanisms will be discussed with reference to various environmental problems such as loss of biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, trans-boundary air pollution, and oil spills. The relationship between trade, development, and environmental protection will receive particular attention throughout the seminar, as will issues arising from the evolving role of non-state actors. The student's grade will be based on class participation and a major paper. Writing for this seminar may be used as partial fulfillment of the J.D. writing requirement.
    Spring 2016
    Georgie Boge Geraghty
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 3) +, a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally and in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with NGOs and other clients to design, collaborate, and implement projects, including litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, and drafting reports. Working in project teams, students develop and hone a variety of skills, including international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Students also critically examine the substance and application of human rights law and discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally. Students are encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Students may enroll for 1, 2 or 3 credits per quarter and may commit to 1, 2 or 3 quarters of participation. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Clinic instructors may grant permission to join the Clinic to students who are unable to take the seminar due to a scheduling conflict if the students have completed or are concurrently enrolled in human rights course work. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel during the break periods.
    Autumn 2015
    Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally and in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with NGOs and other clients to design, collaborate, and implement projects, including litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, and drafting reports. Working in project teams, students develop and hone a variety of skills, including international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Students also critically examine the substance and application of human rights law and discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally. Students are encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Students may enroll for 1, 2 or 3 credits per quarter and may commit to 1, 2 or 3 quarters of participation. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Clinic instructors may grant permission to join the Clinic to students who are unable to take the seminar due to a scheduling conflict if the students have completed or are concurrently enrolled in human rights course work. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel during the break periods.
    Winter 2016
    Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
  • International Human Rights Clinic

    LAWS 67913 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s
    The International Human Rights Clinic works for the promotion of social and economic justice globally and in the United States. The Clinic uses international human rights laws and norms, other substantive law, and multidimensional strategies to draw attention to human rights violations, develop practical solutions using interdisciplinary methodologies, and promote accountability on the part of state and non-state actors. The Clinic works with NGOs and other clients to design, collaborate, and implement projects, including litigation in domestic, foreign, and international tribunals, as well as non-litigation projects, such as documenting violations, legislative reform, and drafting reports. Working in project teams, students develop and hone a variety of skills, including international research, legal and non-legal writing, oral advocacy, communication, interviewing, media advocacy, cultural competency, strategic thinking, and transnational lawyering skills. Students also critically examine the substance and application of human rights law and discuss and confront the ethical challenges of working on human rights problems globally. Students are encouraged, but not required, to take a course in international human rights law or public international law. Students may enroll for 1, 2 or 3 credits per quarter and may commit to 1, 2 or 3 quarters of participation. During Autumn quarter only, Clinic students are required to enroll in the 2-credit International Human Rights Lawyering and Advocacy seminar. Clinic instructors may grant permission to join the Clinic to students who are unable to take the seminar due to a scheduling conflict if the students have completed or are concurrently enrolled in human rights course work. Some students may have the option, but are not required, to undertake international or domestic travel during the break periods.
    Spring 2016
    Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
  • International Human Rights Law and Advocacy

    LAWS 96205 - 01 (2) m, s, x
    This seminar considers major issues in international human rights law and advocacy. It is designed to introduce students to the promotion and protection of human rights through context-driven advocacy mechanisms and strategies. The seminar will provide an introduction to the history of human rights principles and movements, the development of international human rights norms, and an overview of the international, regional and national institutions that develop, interpret and enforce these norms. The remainder of the seminar will evaluate human rights advocacy tools and strategies applied in various political, social and economic contexts. Through case studies and simulated human rights research and advocacy projects, students will develop the skills to conduct international human rights work, including: performing situational assessments; designing and executing field-work and fact-gathering; report writing; interviewing witnesses and victims of abuses; assessing various litigation and non-litigation strategies; conducting effective legal research using diverse sources; developing cross-cultural and context-driven analysis and advocacy skills; and learning to effectively and realistically evaluate achievements and challenges. Class discussions and readings will expose students to critical perspectives on the international human rights regime, as well as current research methodologies and technologies used to monitor and promote human rights.
    Autumn 2015
    Brian Citro, Claudia Flores
  • International Investment Law

    LAWS 96405 - 01 (2 to 3) r, w
    Foreign investment is a central feature of the world economy, and plays an essential role in economic development. It involves a transaction in which an investor in one country (“home state”) sends capital to another (“host state”). But in many cases the transaction is subject to what is called in economics a “dynamic inconsistency problem”, in which the host state’s incentives change once the investment is sunk, and it may want to renege on its promises to the investor. Furthermore, neither side is likely to want any disputes adjudicated in the courts of the other’s country. The global investment regime has arisen to help resolve these problems. The regime includes bilateral investment treaties (known as BITs) as well as multilateral agreements that are embedded in broader treaty structures, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or the Energy Charter Treaty. This course will introduce students to the operation of the investment law regime, with an emphasis on the tensions between home and host states, the impact of the regime on development outcomes, and the relationship between law and arbitration. There are no prerequisites.
    Autumn 2015
    Tom Ginsburg
  • International Tax Policy

    LAWS 44601 - 01 (3) c/l, r, w
    This class provides an introduction to the policy issues raised by the taxation of cross-border flows of investment and income. In recent years, growing international economic integration has been associated with an increased extent and scope of multinational firms’ operations, and with rapidly expanding cross-border investment flows. This class analyzes the tax policy issues raised by these and other related developments. This is not a class on international tax law. While many international tax rules will be introduced and discussed, the focus is on analyzing policy issues using economic and financial perspectives. The class does not require any background in international taxation. It should appeal not only to those with a general interest in taxation and tax policy, but also to those with a background in business law and an interest in the application of economic and financial concepts to the law.
    Winter 2016
    Dhammika Dharmapala
  • International Trade Law

    LAWS 48401 - 01 (3)
    This course focuses on the law governing international trade. It will specifically focus on the laws established by the World Trade Organization. This will include an in-depth analysis of the treaties, regulations, and case law that govern international trade. The course will both cover the basic principles governing trade law, as well as the trade laws governing intellectual property, environmental regulation, food safety, trade in services, and technical standards. The course will also examine the implication of the international trading regime for developing countries, and the political economy of trade negotiations.
    Winter 2016
    Adam Chilton
  • Introduction to Law and Economics

    LAWS 73201 - 01 (3) e, x
    This class is an introduction to the economic analysis of law, an approach that has grown rapidly in the last thirty years and now exerts a profound influence on how law is taught and on how courts make decisions. The class will provide you with a set of tools for analyzing transactions and how they are shaped by legal rules, through systematic exposure to the economic way of thinking about law across a variety of legal contexts. These tools are intended to complement, not to challenge, the traditional doctrinal approach to law. The objective is to equip you to use economic reasoning in an informed and critical spirit to analyze cases and transactions of the sort you may encounter in practice. More generally, you should be able to understand and critically evaluate the use of economic analysis in legal scholarship, judicial opinions, and other legal contexts.
    Spring 2016
    Dhammika Dharmapala
  • Introductory Income Taxation

    LAWS 44121 - 01 (3) x
    This class provides an introduction to federal income tax law, focusing on the taxation of individuals. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) what constitutes income; what is deductible; and the tax treatment of gains and losses, including the role of "basis" and the difference between "realization" and "recognition." Learning to apply the Internal Revenue Code and Treasury Regulations is an important focus of this course. The class often uses the problems posed by the casebook as a focus for class discussion and application of the Internal Revenue Code, Treasury Regulations, cases, and other sources of tax law. Policies underlying the tax law will also be discussed. This class has no prerequisites. The grade is based on an in-class final examination and class participation.
    Autumn 2015
    Leandra Lederman
  • Introductory Income Taxation

    LAWS 44121 - 01 (3) x
    This course provides an introduction to the essential elements of the federal income tax, with a special emphasis on issues related to the taxation of individuals. The topics covered include the nature, timing and measurement of income, the role played by "basis" in calculating gain (and loss) in transactions involving property, the boundary between personal and business expenditures, and the use of the tax system to provide behavioral incentives and disincentives. The course stresses the complex interactions between political and administrative concerns in the tax system.
    Winter 2016
    Julie A. Roin
  • Jenner & Block Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic

    LAWS 67301 - 01 (1 to 3) a, s, x
    The Jenner & Block Supreme Court and Appellate Clinic represents parties and amici curiae in cases before the United States Supreme Court and other appellate courts. Students participate in the researching and drafting of merits briefs, amicus briefs, and cert petitions, conduct research on cases that may be suitable to bring to the Court, and help prepare and participate in moots of oral arguments. The clinic is supervised by clinical faculty, by Professor David Strauss, and by members of the Appellate and Supreme Court Practice group at Jenner & Block. Although the clinic’s focus is the U.S. Supreme Court, the clinic may also handle cases at the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and the Illinois Supreme Court. U.S. Supreme Court: Theory and Practice (LAWS 50311) is a required pre-requisite for participating in the clinic. Academic credit for the clinic varies and is awarded according to the Law School's general criteria for clinical courses as described in the Law School Announcements and by the approval of the clinical faculty.
    Spring 2016
    David A. Strauss
  • Judicial Federalism

    LAWS 59903 - 01 (3) m, r, w, x
    In this seminar, we will explore the various doctrines that police the line between the role of the federal court system and the often-parallel role of the state courts (or occasionally tribal courts). Those doctrines include, for example, the limits on the subject-matter jurisdiction of the federal courts found in Article III; the Rooker-Feldman doctrine; common-law limitations on federal authority such as those for domestic relations and probate cases; the various abstention doctrines (Pullman, Burford, Younger, Colorado River); the Anti-Injunction Acts; notions of lis pendens that apply in both federal and state courts; and "complete" versus defense preemption. Each meeting will involve a discussion of one or more of these doctrines. Students will use Hart and Wechsler's "The Federal Courts and the Federal System" (7th ed. 2015), by Fallon, Manning, Meltzer & Shapiro, ISBN 978-1-60930-427-0. Students will write a paper (which can qualify for the substantial writing requirement) for credit in the seminar. Please note: On Monday, January 25, 2016, this class will meet from 6:10 to 8:10 p.m.
    Winter 2016
    Diane P. Wood
  • Judicial Opinions and Judicial Opinion Writing

    LAWS 52003 - 01 (3) m, s, w, x
    For many graduates of this law school, their first job is as a judicial law clerk, usually in a federal court of appeals. A few graduates will eventually become judges. More important, many, many graduates will have a litigation practice. As law clerks or judges, they must learn to write judicial opinions. As practicing lawyers, they must learn to think like judges so that they will know how to communicate with them effectively, in briefs and at oral argument: something few lawyers know how to do. The seminar aims to teach law students how to think and write like judges, and so to equip them for a future as law clerks, judges, practicing lawyers--or all three.
    Winter 2016
    Richard A. Posner, Robert Hochman
  • Jurisprudence I: Theories of Law and Adjudication

    LAWS 47411 - 01 (3) e, x
    An examination of classic jurisprudential questions in and around the theory of adjudication: the theory of how judges actually do decide cases and how they ought to decide them. These questions include: Do legal rules really constrain judicial decision-making? What makes a rule (or norm) a rule of the legal system? Are principles of morality legally binding even when such principles have not been enacted into a law by a legislature? (Relatedly, are there objective principles of morality?) When no legal norm controls a case, how ought judges to decide that case? Can there be right answers to legal disputes, even when informed judges and lawyers disagree about the answer? Are there principles or methods of legal reasoning that constrain judicial decision-making, or is legal reasoning essentially indeterminate, such that a skillful judge can justify more than one outcome for any given dispute? Is judicial decision-making really distinct from political decision-making of the sort legislators engage in? Readings drawn exclusively from major twentieth-century schools of thought - especially American Legal Realism (e.g., Karl Llewellyn, Jerome Frank), Natural Law (e.g., Ronald Dworkin, John Finnis), and Legal Positivism (e.g., H.L.A. Hart, Joseph Raz) - supplemented by other pertinent readings (from Leslie Green, Richard Posner, and the instructor, among others). No familiarity with either jurisprudence or philosophy will be presupposed, though some readings will be philosophically demanding, and the course will sometimes venture into (and explain) cognate philosophical issues in philosophy of language and metaethics as they are relevant to the core jurisprudential questions. Attendance at the first session is mandatory for those who want to enroll. Take-home essay exam.
    Spring 2016
    Brian Leiter